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Why is Trump allowed to disrespect America?

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posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: MrPitts

It's just that that is one of the most memorable and historical pictures from the 20th century, but ok. Here's the wiki article on the event.
1968 Olympics Black Power salute




posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: MrPitts

It's just that that is one of the most memorable and historical pictures from the 20th century, but ok. Here's the wiki article on the event.
1968 Olympics Black Power salute


Thank you much!

See that's the problem. People like to take symbolic events and make it about themselves and their struggles. Selfishness imo. It was significant and I would've gone about it in a different way like most of us would have. Some people think it was something that needs to be said in front of the whole world. I get that but there are many ways to do it and NOT make it seem like you're doing it for your own selfish ambitions.
edit on 26-9-2017 by MrPitts because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:38 AM
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posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: MrPitts

Let's not ignore the context for their political statement (from here).

The two US athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty.[3] Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue-collar workers in the US and wore a necklace of beads which he described "were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the Middle Passage."[4] All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia's former White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals


And let's not try to gloss over the realities of 1968 either. You know, 4 years after the "Civil Rights Act of 1964" ended the Jim Crow laws & America's racial segregation system; 3 years after the "Voting Rights Act of 1965" finally allowed black Americans the right to vote; 1 year after the Supreme Court case "Loving v Virginia" ended the statewide bans on interracial marriages; a mere 4 months after Dr MLK was assassinated while giving a speech for the "Am I Not A Man And A Brother" movement; and in the middle of the widespread conservative-led anti-integration efforts.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:53 AM
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originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: MrPitts

Let's not ignore the context for their political statement (from here).

The two US athletes received their medals shoeless, but wearing black socks, to represent black poverty.[3] Smith wore a black scarf around his neck to represent black pride, Carlos had his tracksuit top unzipped to show solidarity with all blue-collar workers in the US and wore a necklace of beads which he described "were for those individuals that were lynched, or killed and that no-one said a prayer for, that were hung and tarred. It was for those thrown off the side of the boats in the Middle Passage."[4] All three athletes wore Olympic Project for Human Rights (OPHR) badges after Norman, a critic of Australia's former White Australia Policy, expressed empathy with their ideals


And let's not try to gloss over the realities of 1968 either. You know, 4 years after the "Civil Rights Act of 1964" ended the Jim Crow laws & America's racial segregation system; 3 years after the "Voting Rights Act of 1965" finally allowed black Americans the right to vote; 1 year after the Supreme Court case "Loving v Virginia" ended the statewide bans on interracial marriages; a mere 4 months after Dr MLK was assassinated while giving a speech for the "Am I Not A Man And A Brother" movement; and in the middle of the widespread conservative-led anti-integration efforts.


I know, I can't say anything against that because times were different. So there is that and the feelings about the struggles in society were harsher than we would ever imagine by today's standards. I agree with that assessment.

This does not excuse the actions of the present however. This is the 21st Century and nothing of the past's magnitude can never be dwarfed or remotely compared to todays minor struggles in society.

It isn't even warranted and protest is frowned upon in sporting events in general because most people have an opinion of it causing division within the fan base and discrediting the notion of the purpose of sporting events as what they are there for...

So yeah sports figures can use significant parts of the game to voice their opposition to something, just be prepared for the backlash of said opposition and the loss of support for that sport instead of just protesting on your own time.

Social media is there for a reason. Plenty of places to make your "issues" known to the world.
edit on 26-9-2017 by MrPitts because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: MrPitts

People are still struggling today like they were struggling 50 years ago. There are people today who don't have a voice but need one to speak their problems. Did you miss the part of the wiki article that said these athletes received a huge backlash against their actions too?

Smith and Carlos were largely ostracized by the US sporting establishment and they were subject to criticism. Time magazine on 25 October 1968 wrote: "'Faster, Higher, Stronger' is the motto of the Olympic Games. 'Angrier, nastier, uglier' better describes the scene in Mexico City last week."[17][18] Back home, both Smith and Carlos were subject to abuse and they and their families received death threats.[19]

Same #. Different day.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:58 AM
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The Cowboys and Jerry Jones should have gone to the next level and did the YMCA.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: AboveBoard
YOU get nothing.


That's fine. I'll just go out an 'borrow' some stuff from those loser 99%ers.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: MrPitts

People are still struggling today like they were struggling 50 years ago. There are people today who don't have a voice but need one to speak their problems. Did you miss the part of the wiki article that said these athletes received a huge backlash against their actions too?

Smith and Carlos were largely ostracized by the US sporting establishment and they were subject to criticism. Time magazine on 25 October 1968 wrote: "'Faster, Higher, Stronger' is the motto of the Olympic Games. 'Angrier, nastier, uglier' better describes the scene in Mexico City last week."[17][18] Back home, both Smith and Carlos were subject to abuse and they and their families received death threats.[19]

Same #. Different day.


Yeah maybe pay inequality or the occasional backwards racist but nothing can be compared to 50 years ago. I don't see black people being discriminated against and forced to do anything or go to seperate locations or bathrooms.

Not the same stuff everyday. It still exists time to time. As everything else but a lot has changed.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:01 AM
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Just another thought on this.

Why is there such out-cry over someone kneeling during the national anthem yet when a Muslim gets upset when someone draws a picture of the prophet everyone trivialises it. Now yes granted nobody is going to go around killing people over kneeling but 99.9% of Muslims are not killing people when their faith is disrespected.

I think this is quite a interesting observation.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:03 AM
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a reply to: MrPitts

Dude. Slavery still exists in this country. Just because its illegal doesn't mean it is gone. You have to look under the covers to see the dark side. It exists. It's there. And we need to address it and stop ignoring its existence (not slavery necessarily, though that does need to be taken care of too).



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:03 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: AboveBoard
YOU get nothing.


That's fine. I'll just go out an 'borrow' some stuff from those loser 99%ers.


Totally. We refer to them as "suckers."

I'd offer to team up but...you know the drill...Everyone for themselves unless they're in Daddy's network. I'm gonna go color in my corner office now...

Have fun pillaging...um... I mean 'borrowing!'



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:04 AM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
Just another thought on this.

Why is there such out-cry over someone kneeling during the national anthem yet when a Muslim gets upset when someone draws a picture of the prophet everyone trivialises it. Now yes granted nobody is going to go around killing people over kneeling but 99.9% of Muslims are not killing people when their faith is disrespected.

I think this is quite a interesting observation.

It's the same bs when people get bent out of shape over people insisting on using "happy holidays" instead of "merry christmas". Traditionalists can't stand it when non-traditionalists don't care about tradition as much as they do.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:06 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: MrPitts

Dude. Slavery still exists in this country. Just because its illegal doesn't mean it is gone. You have to look under the covers to see the dark side. It exists. It's there. And we need to address it and stop ignoring its existence (not slavery necessarily, though that does need to be taken care of too).


Corporate slavery, Sex Slavery, Black mail. Yup.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: MrPitts

No. I'm talking about good ole fashioned, "I own you body and soul" slavery.
Slavery Still Exists In The US, You Just Can't See It



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: MrPitts

The big place to look is education. Inner city, predominantly black, schools consistently receive less money than suburban, predominantly white, schools.

Even in my own well off county the schools that are like 90% white get all the funding they need. At the same time the more urban school my mom teaches at where whites are definitely in the minority is always struggling for funding. And this difference in funding is only going to get bigger of Betsy DeVos gets her way.

This is the kind of institutionalized racism these people are protesting against. On the surface the system may not seem racist and yet it really doesn't seem all that different from the "separate equal" days.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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He’s disrespecting individuals in both cases, so there is no sense in conflating that to mean “country”. Best of all is, they deserved it.
edit on 26-9-2017 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:25 AM
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originally posted by: AboveBoard
I'd offer to team up but...you know the drill...Everyone for themselves unless they're in Daddy's network.


It's cool. I wouldn't want to share my favorite sheeple-sandwich acquisition point anyway.



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Did you just state that current events are the same as 50 years ago?

This is why people can't take these protests seriously its basically bored white people begging to have a cause and feel important

They have a right to protest 100% but seriously get a grip and stop Virtue signaling



posted on Sep, 26 2017 @ 09:27 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
Just another thought on this.

Why is there such out-cry over someone kneeling during the national anthem yet when a Muslim gets upset when someone draws a picture of the prophet everyone trivialises it. Now yes granted nobody is going to go around killing people over kneeling but 99.9% of Muslims are not killing people when their faith is disrespected.

I think this is quite a interesting observation.

It's the same bs when people get bent out of shape over people insisting on using "happy holidays" instead of "merry christmas". Traditionalists can't stand it when non-traditionalists don't care about tradition as much as they do.


Yeah its wired.

Its ok for us to disrespect your traditions and beliefs.

But if so so much as stand the wrong way during our national anthem we will lose our minds.




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