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90% of the people in this world are going to Hell.

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posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by Afterl1fe
 


Hmmm what I think about thatttt...... Let's see imagin me getting your idea and crapping on it

Try again, and please don't be a religion dick




posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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God hates religion but He loves people. Here's something for the op to think about. The bible says that when Jesus returns every knee shall bow and every tongue will confess that Jesus is Lord. Now here's the part that will blow your mind, we are at some point going to say that Jesus is Lord. I think that 90% are getting into heaven and 10% aren't. Remember the bible says that not everyone who says to me Lord Lord will enter the kingdom of God. For all the religious ones out there, God made marijuana, tabacco and alcohol. They all occur naturally so be careful who you judge when you tell people they're going to hell. The only ones that Jesus got truly pissed at were the religious people who shut up the doors of heaven to others but weren't getting in themselves. Something to chew on.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 08:39 PM
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I am glad this has no flags.

that is my opinion.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 08:47 PM
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hell is a state of mind.

'strange that i was not told
the brain could hold
in a tiny ivory cell,
gods heaven and hell.'....Oscar Wilde - To L.L.

p.s. i wonder will i burn in hell for not spelling god with a capital g.
(maybe i should change it.....aw kcuf it)



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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I just love these people who think they have the inside scoop on who will go to hell and who will go to heaven. Hmmm only 10% are going to heaven? We all might as well have one hell of sinful party because according to that "so called statistic", the majority of us probably fall in the 90% category.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:01 PM
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Originally posted by WeRpeons
I just love these people who think they have the inside scoop on who will go to hell and who will go to heaven. Hmmm only 10% are going to heaven? We all might as well have one hell of sinful party because according to that "so called statistic", the majority of us probably fall in the 90% category.


the party already started...

And i got a seat reserved



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:07 PM
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The Christian belief that atonement can only be effected through Jesus runs counter to the provisions for atonement prescribed in the Jewish Scriptures. First and foremost, God, and no one else, provides the means of reconciliation and fellowship (2 Chronicles 7:14), which precludes any claim for atonement through the death of Jesus. In contrast to the Christian concept that man is hopelessly entrapped in sin, the Jewish Scriptures provide ample testimony that although man may have an inclination towards evil (Genesis 8:21) the means of personal reconciliation with God are always at hand (e.g. Psalms 51:16-19, Jeremiah 29:13).

The Christian missionary's Question, "Are you saved?" is a Question having no basis in the Jewish Scriptures. Its origin lies in the New Testament and has no bearing on the spiritual life of the Jew. The claim that one person's perfect observance of the Mosaic Law makes it unnecessary for others to observe it is not found in the Jewish Scriptures. The notion of a one time perfect sacrifice is also alien to the Jewish Scriptures.

The New Testament states that included in Jesus' earthly task was the mission to completely fulfill the commandments as literally decreed by God in the Jewish Scriptures (Matthew 5:17-18). According to the New Testament, the Mosaic Law was in effect until Jesus fulfilled all, in all its exactness.
Jesus was to fulfill the Mosaic Law to perfection. For the New Testament's god-man, Jesus, there could be no exceptions to fulfillment that were outside the limitations of the Mosaic Law.

Jesus' supposed sacrificial death took place while the Mosaic Law was still in effect. Any sacrificial offering made prior to the Mosaic Law's end would have to be in full compliance with that Law. Prior to the moment of Jesus' death, the proper procedures and location for a blood atonement sacrifice would be biblically fixed and immutable. The crucifixion of Jesus meets none of these criteria.

If the Mosaic Law was in effect until the exact moment of Jesus' death, or for any length of time afterwards, that act cannot be considered as an atoning blood sacrifice bringing remission of sin. The cause of Jesus' death (even if one imagines that a human sacrifice is permissible) would, if he fulfilled the Law, have had to satisfy the Mosaic Law's requirements in order to be a valid atonement sacrifice.

Jesus' death was alleged to be an essential part of his fulfillment of the Law. Therefore, it was at the exact moment of his death that the requirements of the Mosaic Law were supposedly fulfilled in their entirety. Yet, the death of the New Testament's Jesus does not conform to the Mosaic Law's requirements for offering a blood atonement sacrifice.

According to the New Testament: (1) Jesus supposed atoning death for sin was the culmination of his fulfillment of the Law (Colossians 2:14-17), (2) Jesus' death was the final atoning sacrifice under the Mosaic Law (Hebrews 7:27; 10:10, 12). Thus, only after the exact moment of death would the requirements of the Mosaic Law be nullified.

According to the New Testament's own information, Jesus' death cannot be considered as an atonement sacrifice. Generally, he did not fulfill the requirement of Matthew 5:17-18. There is no indication that he fulfilled the Torah's commandments in their entirety. Furthermore, even if he did, this would not have any bearing on anyone else's obligation to fulfill the Law. Specifically, Jesus' death did not fulfill the New Testament contention that under the Mosaic Law "without shedding of blood there is no forgiveness" (Hebrews 9:22). Jesus did not shed his blood to the extent that it would constitute a blood sacrifice.

Following the New Testament conditions for the nullification of the Law through perfect fulfillment and sacrifice it is obvious that Jesus changed nothing; the Mosaic Law is still in effect.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:21 PM
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here we go....




posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by Akragon
 


What are you talking about? False Christian propaganda on this site?



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by FrenchFryRio
reply to post by Akragon
 


What are you talking about? False Christian propaganda on this site?


well ya i guess, but you're looking for a huge argument with that post....

Can't we all just.....go to hell?

I hear theres a party there



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by Akragon
 


I do not believe in Hell. there are many views because the afterlife isn't described in Judaism. Most Jews don't focus on the afterlife, we let G-d worry about that. Jews focus on the here-and-now: keeping G-d's commandments, studying Torah, caring for others and helping to repair the world.

Some Jews believe that when someone dies and they are righteous, we go to join G-d immediately. If we aren't righteous they spend a short time away from G-d.

Some Jews believe that we enter a sleep-like state until the Messiah/Messianic age and then join in the new world to come.

Some Jews believe in reincarnation until the Messiah/Messianic age or until one becomes righteous enough to join G-d.

Jews do NOT believe in an eternal torment/hell. That would not be part of the righteous plan of a loving G-d. There is NO discussion or description of “hell” in the Jewish Tanakh.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by FrenchFryRio
 


You should read this


www.abovetopsecret.com...

just for fun

this whole thread has Fail written all over it...



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:39 PM
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reply to post by Akragon
 


Fear of G‑d is a very liberating mitzvah.

Think of it this way: Two forces set the stage for your act upon this earth: Love and fear. The smallest things in life are those you love and fear the least; the big things, those you love and fear the most.

With love, you set your goals. With fear, you set your boundaries. One who fears failure is bound to take no risks. One who fears others is banished from his own self. One who fears life has no room to breathe.

The Torah liberates us by declaring there is only one thing to fear—not failure, not others, not even death itself. The only thing to fear is the One who stands beyond and within all things, the one we call G‑d.What is that fear? It may be a simple fear that, "If I do those things He does not like, the consequences will not be good." Or—for the one sensitive to the love for G‑d innate within his soul—fear is the fear of separation from that love and that oneness, as a small child who is afraid to be separated from his parents. For those who ponder G‑d's infinite greatness and the wonders of His creation, fear is a sense of awe and amazement, spontaneously affecting all the senses, taking life up to a whole new level.

Sometimes the word "awe" is a more apt description; sometimes the word "wonder." In all these forms of fear, however, there is one common thread: The awareness of a reality beyond your own that defines and determines all you do. In that way, each form of true fear of G‑d is an escape from the bounds of your own ego to become absorbed within a greater whole—an escape that the greatest love cannot provide. For love is a commentary on the nature of the one who loves, whereas fear, awe and wonder are exclusively about the One who is feared.

What if you don't have that sense of wonder, or even awe, or even fear? You can make time each day to ponder your relationship with your G‑d, to become acutely aware of His awesome and loving presence. Once that awareness finds a fixed place in your heart, all you do will fall in place, with joy and pleasure. You will be free.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by FrenchFryRio
reply to post by Akragon
 


Fear of G‑d is a very liberating mitzvah.

Think of it this way: Two forces set the stage for your act upon this earth: Love and fear. The smallest things in life are those you love and fear the least; the big things, those you love and fear the most.

With love, you set your goals. With fear, you set your boundaries. One who fears failure is bound to take no risks. One who fears others is banished from his own self. One who fears life has no room to breathe.

The Torah liberates us by declaring there is only one thing to fear—not failure, not others, not even death itself. The only thing to fear is the One who stands beyond and within all things, the one we call G‑d.What is that fear? It may be a simple fear that, "If I do those things He does not like, the consequences will not be good." Or—for the one sensitive to the love for G‑d innate within his soul—fear is the fear of separation from that love and that oneness, as a small child who is afraid to be separated from his parents. For those who ponder G‑d's infinite greatness and the wonders of His creation, fear is a sense of awe and amazement, spontaneously affecting all the senses, taking life up to a whole new level.

Sometimes the word "awe" is a more apt description; sometimes the word "wonder." In all these forms of fear, however, there is one common thread: The awareness of a reality beyond your own that defines and determines all you do. In that way, each form of true fear of G‑d is an escape from the bounds of your own ego to become absorbed within a greater whole—an escape that the greatest love cannot provide. For love is a commentary on the nature of the one who loves, whereas fear, awe and wonder are exclusively about the One who is feared.

What if you don't have that sense of wonder, or even awe, or even fear? You can make time each day to ponder your relationship with your G‑d, to become acutely aware of His awesome and loving presence. Once that awareness finds a fixed place in your heart, all you do will fall in place, with joy and pleasure. You will be free.


Intersting....

Though i don't think fear is a good thing in any form. If you are aware of the presence of God why would you fear it? It would create nothing but negitive vibrations, and unlike the physical world, in the spiritual world it seem likeness attract as opposed to opposites. Just my thoughts...



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 09:54 PM
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The other 10% not going to hell are gonna be lonely because without us they have no entertainment



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 11:08 PM
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People, the OP admitted to trolling us on page 3.

Please stop feeding the troll.




Originally posted by Afterl1fe
 

Troll/End thank you for your entertainment. I give you permission to ban me now.

Expect us.

edit on 15/2/2011 by Kryties because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 11:30 PM
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reply to post by Afterl1fe
 


I'm pretty sure your what we call in Australia a wanker...........



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 11:31 PM
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I'm a non believer that had a very vivid and prolonged near death experience and briefly visited heaven.

People have written books that claim to be the word of god but the truth is that the afterlife is extremely sane and organic. If you are a good person you will end up with others like you.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by Afterl1fe
NOTE!!! this is based off of statistics not my personal belief. I'm not your judge.
edit on 15-2-2011 by Afterl1fe because: adding details



LOLOLOLOLOLOL

what a glaring contradiction packed neatly into such a short two sentences.

your entire argument is based on your PERSONAL BELIEF that there is in fact a hell, and your PERSONAL BELIEF that acceptance of Jesus Christ determines who is sent there.

/facepalm

EDIT: successful troll is successful
edit on 15-2-2011 by thedeadlyrhythm because: troll toll



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by candide
 


care to share your experience in more detail? i've heard a few NDE stories, and i definitely find them interesting.

thanks!



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