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John Lear's Moon Pictures on ATS

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posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by MatyasBut we ain't gonna get our beamships without holding back on the best info, so I know it won't come out here either.

The curtain is going to have to come down on this act, and it would not be wise to play all the cards befire then...


Agreed... but its soooo hard not to want to spill all the beans...


I have a question...

Neil Armstrong...steps down onto the Moon First man on the Moon...

Buzz Aldrin is till inside the LEM

So ummmm who took the picture?




posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 09:07 PM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
I don't fully agree with you when you say that you doubt the Chinese will make it to the Moon. You think the US of A has the guts and resources to aggressively stop them? Nah!


Yah I think we just might... And IF as we claim there is already a thriving active operation up there... wouldn't be to hard to arrange an "accident" and have their ship crash...

ESA's Smart 1 made a nice little cloud of dust when it went down...

Well Japan is out of the game now...


Assosiated Press
Updated: 8:30 a.m. PT Jan 15, 2007

TOKYO - Japan's space agency has recommended scrapping its first moon mission after more than a decade of delays, a spokeswoman said Monday, in the latest blow to the country's beleaguered space program.


Source

Don't know about India yet...

As to China... if we staged a war with them in say 2008, that would give Bush a reason to stay in office...





posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 10:02 PM
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Originally posted by Matyas

Sandman658- Now when do you suppose that technology came out for those inflatable houses (are quick enough to snatch the pebbles from my palm)?


OH OH I Know that one!!!



It begins with an overview and historical review of membrane/inflatable applications for space by A.B. Chmielewski, manager of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Large Telescope Systems Office. Although inflatable structures have been deployed since the 1950s for antennas and sunshades, he points out that new materials and inflation systems will greatly expand their use in both near-term and far-term missions.


SOURCE

Deployed since the fifties?


So maybe we solve radiation problems with inflatable space umbrellas...



posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 10:16 PM
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China in theory, but W&co. is not smart enuf to pull it off...he is "fine" *ahem*
with the small fries, but when a behemoth comes along like Russia he just rolls over and pees. That is why our trade debt to China has skyrocketed.

My guess is some market crisis with regards to China will spark a newly fevered space race in the private sector, perhaps for mineral resources, I can see it happening.

I was poking around undo's play area, Lomonosov crater, and I came across this:

Curious formation near Edison T crater

24.65Nx98.45E

Does anyone have better resolution than PDS on this readily available?



posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon OH OH I Know that one!!!


Dangnabit, that was meant for sandman!

Ah well, I'd have to cite you as my source anyway


So deployed since the 50s, remember Sputnik (Spoot-nyik) kiddies? So how long have they been under development?



posted on Feb, 2 2007 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon I have a question...

Neil Armstrong...steps down onto the Moon First man on the Moon...

Buzz Aldrin is till inside the LEM

So ummmm who took the picture?


Dat's easy, a journalist! Didn't you see the smaller LEM with "PRESS" written on it?

And when we make our debut at another star, just ignore the extra ship with the CNN logo...



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 01:01 AM
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Originally posted by Matyas

Originally posted by zorgon I have a question...

Neil Armstrong...steps down onto the Moon First man on the Moon...

Buzz Aldrin is till inside the LEM

So ummmm who took the picture?


Dat's easy, a journalist! Didn't you see the smaller LEM with "PRESS" written on it?

And when we make our debut at another star, just ignore the extra ship with the CNN logo...


Jeez! Who took the pics? Elementary Dr Watson!! What with earthlings already screwing around on the Moon for exotic materials, it’s incumbent to protect their asses, I mean bases, with SC-LRPs (Self Contained Long Range Patrols).

So whodunit? Capt Shnooker, of course, the patrol leader with his Zeiss TPP hooked to a Hasselblad!! Didn’t you guys know??


Cheers!


[edit on 3-2-2007 by mikesingh]



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 03:58 AM
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Actually, the picture was taken by a camera placed there by Neil before he "first set foot on the surface". I can't remember right off hand which documentary I heard that from, but in most cases, such as this, they put the camera out there to get the film, and then go about doing the "first cut". The TV series "Survivorman" is a perfect example of this very thing. He has to record everything twice, just to get what he needs to into the film.


Now onto something a bit closer to my heart...

To the poster that so vehemently disagrees with me about my comment about Hubble's ability to see:

Yes, you are indeed right about Hubble's resolution. According to
Nasa themselves:



For a telescope with a circular collecting area of diameter D (2.4 m for
Hubble), the smallest feature that one can resolve at wavelength L
(550 x 10^-9 m for visible light) is given roughly by:

resolution = 1.4 L/D = 3.2 x 10^-7 radians

This estimate gives the "diffraction limited" resolution, or the resolution
based on light's wave-like characteristics. It is difficult to improve
upon this limit.

The distance to the Moon is roughly 240,000 miles. Hubble's resolution
corresponds to a physical dimension of

size = x = 0.08 miles = 405 feet = 124 meters

at the Moon's surface ... roughly the size of a football field.


So, having seen and ingested all of that, you sir, are correct in that statement. I stand corrected.

However, how that applies to anything but that ONE post of mine is as yet undetermined. I am glad that you pointed that out though. I look forward to debating with you when you come back, should the mods be so gracious as to allow you to return.

I did learn something though, and for that I can thank you..

Thanks man. I learned something.

For Democracy,

TheBorg



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 06:21 AM
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OK, Getting back to the pic that Ron posted – the ‘boulder shot’. I’ve been trying to figure this out for a couple o’ weeks when I first chanced upon it, I don’t remember where. But check out the second ‘boulder' too. It’s going in the opposite direction!!

Now some wisecrack said that the ‘boulder’ rolled down the slope. Logical! But how about the second object that seems to have rolled up the slope?? Anti grav? Wind? Or self propulsion? But hey, I could be wrong! If you look closely, the shadows don't prove it to be an object. It seems more like some track going into a 'hole' or depression.

Also notice there’s some kind of a ‘structure’ near these ‘boulders’. I’ve marked it in white.

And also check out where the tracks meet. At the object near the bottom right corner!! Is something fishy going on down there in this area??

i118.photobucket.com..." border=0>


Cheers!



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 08:11 AM
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Another Looney. I recommend reviewing all the articles there, I am not certain how long they will last...


Added note: I had the opportunity to meet with Dr. Gerard K. O'Neill some years ago. His untimely lateness also has the odor of suspicion to it, so I believe he qualifies for the "Dead Scientists Society".

Edit to add note(-worthy being)

[edit on 2/3/2007 by Matyas]



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 02:06 PM
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mikesingh,

perhaps the second boulder is not a boulder. that looks like a contrail rather than a furrow.



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 05:05 PM
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Hi guys.

I was watching some video's today from TED conferences when I came across one by Micheal Shermer (Founder of Skeptic Magazine).

www.ted.com...

About half way through he talks about pattern recognition and it reminded me of this thread. It's a good video on the whole and I urge you to watch it all the way through just for general interest.



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 05:55 PM
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Originally posted by CaptainLazy
Hi guys.

I was watching some video's today from TED conferences when I came across one by Micheal Shermer (Founder of Skeptic Magazine).

www.ted.com...

About half way through he talks about pattern recognition and it reminded me of this thread. It's a good video on the whole and I urge you to watch it all the way through just for general interest.


i urge you to learn how our reconnaisance was undertaken in the past. We got photos from the sky of the land below, and poured over it with magnifying glasses. Then we marked the areas of interest and gave them names. this was how we learned important info about places like nazi bases in WWII.



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 09:23 PM
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Originally posted by CaptainLazy
About half way through he talks about pattern recognition and it reminded me of this thread.


That guys a real nut case....

either that or a government disinfo agent...

Besides we already covered the "Looks like" objects early on so we could get to the real anomalies



posted on Feb, 3 2007 @ 10:50 PM
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I just got back from the mine. I read Ingo Swann's Penetration yesterday. Ingo was way ahead of me back in 1998 when the book was published. All the stuff I am saying was on the farside of the moon he was saying in 1998. The black ops chapter is riviting. For anybody interested in the farside Penetratin is the book and Ingo Swann is the man. Usually nothing surprises me anymore. Penetration surprised me. I appreciated Ingo's honesty and his dry sense of humor.



posted on Feb, 4 2007 @ 01:52 AM
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Hey john! Seen the boulders we've been playin with? Figured I should put in my input. After having looked at the last ones that zorgon put up, I'm left to wonder just what's going on there. There may in-fact be some sort of colony there. While I don't know that to be true, I don't know it to be not true. It merits more study.

What we're doing here is laying the groundwork for a breakthrough. We just need more information on the true nature of the surface. I only wish we could get there to take a good, long look.

TheBorg



posted on Feb, 4 2007 @ 03:41 AM
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Resistance is Futile....


Space Command 26th Space Aggressor Patch







And here is a little interesting fact I ran into regarding the stae of technology in space in 1960...






Title: 20th Space Surveillance Squadron
Location: United States Air Force
Point of Interest : The Tower was Built in 1960 and Contains a Transmitter and Receiver that are Components of the Largest Phase Radar in the World. The Radar was Used to Track Soviet Targets, and Now Assists with the Space Shuttle. This Radar also Tracks the Equatorial Plain Orbit. It is Capable of Tracking a Target the Size of a 12 oz. Soft Drink Can 25,000 Miles Away in Space. The Total Value of the Radar Tower is in Excess of $800,000,000.


SOURCE

And this one is fasinating...

The 1st Space Operations Squadron is a component of the 50th Operations Group, 50th Space Wing, Schriever Air Force Base, CO. The unit was originally activated on February 14, 1961 as the 1st Aerospace Control Squadron which was in operation until April 1976

[edit on 4-2-2007 by zorgon]



posted on Feb, 4 2007 @ 05:34 AM
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I need to get one of those patches.. I'm likin where this is goin zorg. Keep it up!!

TheBorg



posted on Feb, 4 2007 @ 11:29 AM
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Originally posted by TheBorg
Hey john!. There may in-fact be some sort of colony there. While I don't know that to be true, I don't know it to be not true. It merits more study.



Colony? Try millions of people. Millions of peole live on the moon. They look just like us but they are much more advanced. The moon has a breathable atmosphere, the gravity is about 65% that of earths. There are rivers, lakes, clouds, fog, huge structures, huge towers, huge mining operations.

We are not supposed to know this. I am not exactly sure why not. The level of secrecy is extraordinary. Most people think of the moon interms of what the Apollo 8 crew said when they came around from the backside: ""Dead, lonely. a dirty gray."

Ha Ha. I can just imagine those three guys bouncing off the walls of that spacecraft having seen what they just saw on the farside, and then having to describe a lie to the American public.

Hey, they did what they were told and they are heroes. Its OUR fault for believing them.



posted on Feb, 4 2007 @ 11:48 AM
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Originally posted by johnlear Colony? Try millions of people. Millions of peole live on the moon. They look just like us but they are much more advanced.


I'm tellin' ya, that's where they make the cookies. I was eating apple chips this morning, and I thought to myself just because they taste like apples doesn't mean they were made here...

I'll go along w/it so long as there are some hotties, and I wouldn't want to end up on a disection table



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