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Volcano Eruption on MarS?

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posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 02:41 AM
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a reply to: ParasuvO

As opposed to your impressive list of facts there.

There's a huge difference between speculation and empirically tested models based on years of data collection and analysis.




posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 02:47 AM
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A fire in Helium?

Or the Green Men have finally conquered Helium?

I luvs me some John Carter.



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 04:09 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
Why on Earth would NASA conceal an active volcanic eruption on Mars?


Because Mars doesn't have magnetic field like Earth does? Which implies that Mars doesn't have a liquid core (needed to produce the said magnetic field)? Which implies that Mars shouldn't have volcanic eruptions of any kind (in the absence of the said liquid core)? Which implies that if there are volcanic eruptions (or even simple venting events) on Mars, there's something strange happening with Mars' core, that no one can (or, rather, is willing to) explain?

In short, Mars' core may be heating up (liquefying), which should produce initially weak, but increasingly stronger magnetic field (as the liquefied core starts to rotate), which should all be detectable by Mars Rover (providing that the damn controversial thing isn't actually located in Alaska or Iceland).

Volcanic eruptions on Mars aside, if you ever hear NASA start talking about Mars suddenly having a magnetic field similar to Earth's, you'll know exactly what's happening - the same thing that's now happening to Earth, with its increase in earthquakes and volcanic activity, all courtesy of LHC and the initial and primary reason LHC was built for in the first place.

If you don't know why LHC was actually built for, spend some 5 minutes googling it, and you should get your answer (no, it's nothing to do with Higgs boson). I don't want to ruin the surprise for anybody who still doesn't know.

...

... aaand... after trying to google it myself... surprise, surprise... it's (almost) all gone. Scrubbed from the net like it never existed.

...

Well, never mind. Just google "large hadron collider black hole", and you might just be able to read some of the information shreds still left intact, with perfectly good explanations of how micro black holes can be used as energy sources... if they don't fly away and get stuck at the center of some major celestial body, that is... like Earth... or Mars... or any other planet in the Solar system... or, for that matter, Sun... causing it to change its behavior in some surprising (and unpredictable) ways.



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 04:10 AM
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a reply to: clusterfok




Because Mars doesn't have magnetic field like Earth does? Which implies that Mars doesn't have a liquid core (needed to produce the said magnetic field)? Which implies that Mars shouldn't have volcanic eruptions of any kind (in the absence of the said liquid core)?

Do you think that volcanic eruptions originate from a planet's core? Is that where they originate from on Earth?



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 04:19 AM
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a reply to: clusterfok

But we do have a solid core it seems

academic.oup.com...




The core of the Earth is made up mainly of iron, in an outer liquid layer and an inner solid layer. The outer core is where the circulating conducting liquid generates the geodynamo, responsible for our magnetic field.


So yeah the liquid bit generates the field, but the inner core is solid.

As for your other stuff. No.



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 04:25 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Confirmation is always a good thing in science.
But new stuff is better.



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: MeanMinistry

What on Earth-sorry-what on Mars is that?

I was under the impression that the volcanoes on Mars were dormant at best. But how cool would it be if Olympus Mons blew it's stack? that wouldn't need telescopes, hell it's three times higher than Everest and it's diameter is the size of Texas.

Whatever it is, It couldn't beat the big ol' erupting.



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: MeanMinistry

What on Earth-sorry-what on Mars is that?

I was under the impression that the volcanoes on Mars were dormant at best. But how cool would it be if Olympus Mons blew it's stack? that wouldn't need telescopes, hell it's three times higher than Everest and it's diameter is the size of Texas.

Whatever it is, It couldn't beat the big ol' erupting.



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: Thecakeisalie

It would be really cool , it would be possible that mars could even gain another natural satellite
if it launches Ejecta with enough force it could create another moon!


Wouldnt it be cool if we were travelling through some dense galactic field of energy which encourages planets out of hyper sleep and back into genesis!



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 07:19 PM
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edit on 23-10-2018 by humanoidlord because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: humanoidlord


all those volcanos are supervolcanos
Actually, they seem to be more of the shield variety rather than the strato. Like Hawaiian volcanoes, they don't do much explodin'.
www.sci-news.com...




It's a cloud. Shows up around this time every Martian year.
www.planetary.org...

This same mountain gets a different sort of cloud as well. Every year. More of a huge dust devil.

Just before southern winter begins, sunlight warms the air on the slopes of the volcano. This air rises, bringing small amounts of dust with it. Eventually, the rising air converges over the volcano's caldera, the large, circular depression at its summit. The fine sediment blown up from the volcano's slopes coalesces into a spiraling cloud of dust that is thick enough to actually observe from orbit.


www.jpl.nasa.gov...
edit on 10/23/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/23/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2018 @ 10:25 PM
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Just so you know, there's a bunch of spacecraft orbiting Mars that measure the atmosphere's chemical composition and other parameters. Anything major like a volcano eruption would have been detected by their instruments.


Any substantial venting would produce changes in atmospheric chemistry which would be detectable by SAM on Curiosity (which routinely does atmospheric analysis) and by MAVEN, and now certainly by TGO. Since there is a history of seeing these clouds, that would show up in the data. If it's not been found, it's not there.

www.unmannedspaceflight.com...



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 04:53 AM
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Aye , we'd likely hear about mass ejection of gases from the vents before we'd hear about any eruptions , the bellowing of gases from the mantle would be detected first right!

Not to mention the marsquakes that would accompany the gas ejection

edit on 24-10-2018 by sapien82 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 06:07 AM
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originally posted by: drewlander
a reply to: MeanMinistry

Is there any chance this a plume as a result of an impact, and not a plume derived from deep within the planet?


Good thinking. I was thinking maybe a methane plume? Seems there could be some biological processes going on on ol' rusty after all!

"Methane is quickly destroyed in the Martian atmosphere in a variety of ways, so our discovery of substantial plumes of methane in the northern hemisphere of Mars in 2003 indicates some ongoing process is releasing the gas," says lead author Michael Mumma of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "At northern mid-summer, methane is released at a rate comparable to that of the massive hydrocarbon seep at Coal Oil Point in Santa Barbara, Calif."


NASA Science



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 06:28 AM
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It's always refreshing to find out more about mars !

This recent study suggests that the water on Mars could hold enough oxygen for simple aerobic life


A team led by scientists at Caltech and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), which Caltech manages for NASA, has calculated that if liquid water exists on Mars, it could -- under specific conditions -- contain more oxygen than previously thought possible. According to the model, the levels could even theoretically exceed the threshold needed to support simple aerobic life.


Mars: Oxygen Rich , life supporting liquid water



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 07:43 AM
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a reply to: Thecakeisalie

Mars being samaller than earth would have cooled faster

The planet has probably been solid for eons with no liquid rock to create volcano

One possible explanation is eruption of steam/gas from underground Maybe from vaporization of buried water/ice or CO2 heating up

The gas breaks out the on the surface causing a plume of gas and throwing out soil and dust - a mud geyser



posted on Oct, 24 2018 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: Alien Abduct

Methane is an invisible gas.



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 03:22 AM
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a reply to: Phage

But what if the invisible methane were mixed with ice particles and what-nots?

Perhaps a better explanation could be a very large dust devil?

IMAGE



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 03:23 AM
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a reply to: Alien Abduct

Perhaps a better explanation could be a very large dust devil?


That happens too. But it looks different. Posted a bit above:
www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 10/25/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2018 @ 07:09 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Ah that explains it, thanks.




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