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8.9 Quake hits off coast of Japan! Live Updates.

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posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:37 AM
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reply to post by Ceriddwen
 


No worries. Totally understood that lol. No stupid question right? Although, I didn't understand the boat comment made previously. Ha




posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:38 AM
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Originally posted by Bossdog82
Just read something freaky

9-11-01

03-10-11

put the dates together

12-21-12

sorry to go off topic

That's really weird...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:39 AM
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Originally posted by birdVSworm
Does water move freely under it if it is man-made? Like a bridge of land made between two islands?


No. Engineers know what they are doing, when it comes to making a stable enough foundation, that will hold and support the building on top of it. It is mostly solid. However, an earthquake of this magnitude is obviously capable of destruction. Down in the sea, is still trash, which will not be as stable as solid rock. After things get moved around, it is possible that water can flow into and though, causing it to become even more unstable.


reply to post by Ceriddwen
 

I think you are slightly mistaken. You are correct that the main island is not manmade, but other parts are.

The world's first international airport on the sea "Kansai International Airport" was built on a man-made island on the sea, about five kilometers off the coast of Senshu in Osaka Bay. It opened on September 4, 1994. The huge, long building stretching 1.7 kilometers alongside the 3,500-meter runway is the passenger terminal building.

pas.ce.wsu.edu...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:39 AM
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reply to post by Dragon33
 


I'd like the cookie please.

I was being sarcastic towards the user who posted the thing about the boat motor.

Anyway he acknowledged he was just trying to make a general point and that nuclear scientists know more about it.

I wasn't intending to cause an argument or anything of the sort.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:40 AM
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So, looks like the reactor isn't looking too good. Let's start talking damage. If this reactor melts down (which it looks like it might), how much damage can we expect?

I heard it could be deadly for the people of Japan, is that true? What about Asia and the rest of the world? Any effects there?



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:43 AM
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reply to post by mossme89
 


If it does meltdown, there is no definitve way to say what will happen. It could cause massive damage now and for years to come, or it could do nothing. Look up the cases of 2 meltdowns in the U.S, where nothing signifcant happened.

The fact is, we just don't know what the situation is there. Different ingredients to the situation can either make things worse or better. Time will tell.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:44 AM
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reply to post by Kram09
 


No probs friend. No offence intended... just thought blood sugar may be getting a little low due to all your input into this discussion. I know mine is, and thats just from trying to keep up!


I for one am off to find a chocolate biscuit or two.... Drop round and we can open a pack...

Cheers.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:44 AM
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I would imagine that every technological precaution has been taken against water of any type actualy comming into contact with dangerously overheating radiological matter. As another poster mentioned, water of any sort will only be used to draw heat AWAY from the danger area, thus reducing the over all temperature around the core.
The reason they are using salt water, is because it has a higher boiling point than does clean water, which means that there is less risk of the water boiling in the pipes and causing pressure ruptures. The higher boiling point also means that more heat can be exchanged per litre of water, from the hot components , to the saltwater, than if they had used clean water.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


I wasn't talking about that, I was talking as a whole. I already stated that part of Tokyo Bay was man-made.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:47 AM
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Originally posted by TrueBrit
I would imagine that every technological precaution has been taken against water of any type actualy comming into contact with dangerously overheating radiological matter. As another poster mentioned, water of any sort will only be used to draw heat AWAY from the danger area, thus reducing the over all temperature around the core.
The reason they are using salt water, is because it has a higher boiling point than does clean water, which means that there is less risk of the water boiling in the pipes and causing pressure ruptures. The higher boiling point also means that more heat can be exchanged per litre of water, from the hot components , to the saltwater, than if they had used clean water.


That makes a lot of sense now, thanks for bringing those points up!



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:52 AM
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Good morning all!
After sitting here for more than 16 hours yesterday I had non stop dreams of earthquakes. Expected nothing less!

Anyway, what I got from the last two pages was that the problems with the reactors and cooling systems have worsened?
I also saw that they want to use SALT WATER to cool it down?
uh oh....
Did they manage to evacuate everyone they could? How have the responses been from other countries?
The possibility of a meltdown, did they say how far on land the effects will reach should one happen? I know they were focusing on evacuating people within 3 km of the plant. Has the radius increased?
Thanks in advance!!


EDIT:

I would imagine that every technological precaution has been taken against water of any type actualy comming into contact with dangerously overheating radiological matter. As another poster mentioned, water of any sort will only be used to draw heat AWAY from the danger area, thus reducing the over all temperature around the core.
The reason they are using salt water, is because it has a higher boiling point than does clean water, which means that there is less risk of the water boiling in the pipes and causing pressure ruptures. The higher boiling point also means that more heat can be exchanged per litre of water, from the hot components , to the saltwater, than if they had used clean water.


I saw this quote after my post ^^
edit on 12-3-2011 by jonibelle because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by jonibelle
 


uk.reuters.com...

Area expanded to 20 last I checked!
edit on 12-3-2011 by birdVSworm because: Spelling, ugh.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:57 AM
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Originally posted by birdVSworm
reply to post by RMFX1
 


Omg, thank you! en.wikipedia.org... Exactly what I meant actually, though without proper wording. I'm not a he though, *She

edit on 12-3-2011 by birdVSworm because: (no reason given)


Oops..please accept my apologies



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 06:59 AM
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reply to post by birdVSworm
 


20? uh oh....
thanks for the link! (:



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by jonibelle
 


Not a prob! I've been following this thread for too long now haha. Also helpful:

www.oe-files.de...
edit on 12-3-2011 by birdVSworm because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 07:05 AM
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reply to post by RMFX1
 



Haha, no worries! My SN does sound masculine I guess! lol



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 07:06 AM
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reply to post by mossme89
 


It also helps when you change the format dd/mm/yyy, mm/dd/yyy as well



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 07:09 AM
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www.cnn.com...


Officials say a pumping system was to blame for the explosion at the nuclear facility, not damage to the reactor itself. Cooling process is expected to take 2 days.



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 07:10 AM
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in.reuters.com...

About the sea water being let into the plant...



posted on Mar, 12 2011 @ 07:10 AM
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Latest news from BBC News, people living nearby reactor explosion are being given iodine tablets. Also Greenpeace expert says that the whole truth is not getting out from the Japanese authorities on the severity of the nuclear power plant explosion in his experience of the way the Japanese handle such events.
Using the sea water as the pipes might have broke from the main water supply that supply cooling to the reactor by the earthquake. How they will get the sea water to the site is being discussed? Makes you wonder how they are keeping it cool up till now? Seems as soon as water touches the container of fuel rods, it immediately steams off. So you needs loads of water to keep it cool?
This reactor will be a right off as it won't restart.



This is th best UK coverage of the Japan earthquake:
www.bbc.co.uk...
edit on 12-3-2011 by kalenga because: (no reason given)



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