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Toxic Rain in North Carolina????

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posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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Well we are having the exact same problems in memphis, as explained in the video circulating. But I wanted to show you what the problem looked like and explain it on the scale that it is now.

This acid rain/ fungus/ bacteria is not just effecting small plots of crops, or a few trees. Every single tree, plant, plot of crop, building, car, etc, is being affected by this, and not just in memphis. I have friends in middle Mississippi that are having the same problems except worse, entire trees are dyeing off, birds are falling out of the sky, cars are rusting.

In memphis there are 3 farmers who are reporting 70% crop loss, and as I said when you travel down the streets there are whole trees that are turning brown or gray. This is not some simple problem and it is going to destroy the farming industry REGARDLESS of what people try to do to stop it.

Enjoy the pictures I took them today for you.

Even the bark is suffering








Oh yes also I have a colleague that works at the local University who is a chemist and an assistant professor in charge of atmospheric readings, he told me on friday that memphis has shown a 3% oxygen loss over the past week, as well as extreme increases in other chemicals he could not tell me; why could he not tell me I asked? I got a simple answer, "Because we have had to sign waivers of non disclosure, and breaching of the contract means we loose EVERYTHING"; I asked him when did he sign these waivers... He answered with something I did not expect, "Late April".

Think of it what you will




posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 



I haven't looked honestly and my mother has a huge garden and it's been raining like crazy where she lives and if something killed her crops believe me she would be complaining up a storm. I will ask her later today if she notices anything different with her plants and veggies. I will also look outside today since it's raining right now. If I see anything I will take pics for you.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:15 PM
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www.marisys.com...


IMPORTANT


By the way, should we participate seems fun to me(link below)

dengedenge.com...

[edit on 20-6-2010 by MrOrange82]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:16 PM
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Those pics posted by the OP are of plant disease and insect effects. Some are fungal (mildew, Anthracnose, etc?), and some may be bacterial. These do not look like result effects of chemical damage. HOWEVER, our constantly deteriorating atmosphere is effecting the immune systems of plants and proliferating these diseases (same as with us). When someone starts seeing oily residue or filmy substances on their plants after a rain, then we gotta worry.


[edit on 20-6-2010 by whatsup]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:22 PM
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Hi-

I'm a farmer in Western North Carolina. Been doing it for 10 years now. And while i think there may be something to what you guys are posting, basically every image posted looks like nothing other than insect or bacterial damage.

Just saying.

Acid rain wouldnt only hit a few select leaves, which is what ALL of these images show. In addition, the OP shows a picture of a tomato in the early stages of blight. A very common condition for tomatoes. Unfortunately for the OP, the image is of a very well-developed tomato plant. Seeing as this is only early June, the lilihood of that even being a recent image is highly unlikely. Tomatoes do not look like that until august.

This is either a hoax, or a lot of naive people who dont know anything about plants.

Sorry to dissappoint. Feel free to call me a shill, now.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by Aziroth
 


Dude, that is ALL insect and fungal damage.

Take a pest management course some time :-)

Also, acid rain is formed when normal rain falls through a cloud of suspended toxins. the liklihood of anything associated with the gulf making to north carolina and tennesee at this point is highly unlikely. Like i said, I have farme din NC for ten years. None of our plants have been effected by this.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by Aziroth
 


I don't know what to think, can anyone post some pictures of past plant life damaged by chemicals?




Effects of acid rain on plant life.

Both natural vegetation and crops are affected by acid rain. The roots are damaged by acidic rainfall, causing the growth of the plant to be stunted, or even in its death. Nutrients present in the soil, are destroyed by the acidity. Useful micro organisms which release nutrients from decaying organic matter, into the soil are killed off, resulting in less nutrients being available for the plants. The acid rain, falling on the plants damages the waxy layer on the leaves and makes the plant vulnerable to diseases. The cumulative effect means that even if the plant survives it will be very weak and unable to survive climatic conditions like strong winds, heavy rainfall, or a short dry period. Plant germination and reproduction is also inhibited by the effects of acid rain.




[edit on 123030p://bSunday2010 by Stormdancer777]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by Nosred
reply to post by boondock-saint
 


That's very strange. I too live in NC but I haven't noticed anything like that. I guess it's possible that the oil spill is affecting us but I live on the coast so you would think I would have noticed something like this before you if it was the oil. Chemtrails? Maybe.


No you would not . This current oil spill is nothing like past . And also you being near the coast means nothing . The coast of your state has never has an oil spill like this . This is not a spill, Its a oil well that broke off . The toxics used to spray the oil on the gulf would not travel to the coast they would flow the winds. Most winds push south in the winter but north east in the summer. That means , Georgia , Alabama , would see effects before that state from toxics in the air. Anyplace north of the gulf of mexico about 50 to 150 miles north would be a sign that the rain was toxic anything close to the gulf would just be part of the oil spill and the climate that is down there and north of that would see effects before that state .



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:43 PM
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By the way . This oil spill is the worst in united states history. So any effects on the earth or climate in the south east part of the united states that has never had a toxic event like this to take place. should be looked at . effects on plants , and grass, weeds, even birds, This oil spill should also be looked over by water ground and soil . but then maybe its not as bad



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 12:50 PM
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The thing that prompts me to believe that this plant damage is something more than just simple insect and/or bacterial infection is all the new members coming on the boards saying "no problem, move along"........yeah right!

Odd they would show up just when we are in the first stages of an ecological disaster. Who are these guys?





Paranoid...maybe a little!

[edit on 20-6-2010 by whaaa]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:02 PM
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It really bugs me when threads like this get flagged to the top. Please at least read some of the more likely explanations before getting excited.

As an entomologist who has worked for the Department of Primary Industries in Australia, studying the effects of insects and diseases on various crops -- producing effects exactly the same as in the pics -- and seeing first hand this sort of damage practically everywhere, I can ASSURE you this isn't caused by acid rain!

And I'm pretty much 100% certain some of the damage shown in the OP's pics are many days old -- so to say it all happened within a few hours tells me he's at the least, not very observant when it comes to nature.



[edit on 20/6/10 by Navieko]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


I am having a problem with the time line. You were eating, it smelled funny, you grabbed the camera, you noticed the damage in three different stages of developement and photographed it.
So how fast does it proceed from one stage to the next?
My folks raised peaches and spots on the leaves were fairly common.
We have had some unusal weather patterns, but seems like toxins would rain out closer to the Gulf.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
Could you give a time-frame for the damage you photographed?

I do not know the time frame.
This is NOT my garden. I just noticed
it yesterday and took all those pics in
the same day. The white, yellow, black
cycle was assumed by me from what I saw.
I do not think all this happened from one
rain. And I have no idea how long it's
been like this or how long it takes to
get holes in the leaves. I am not a gardner.
I just sat down to have lunch outside,
smelled a foul odor in the rain and started
to look at the plants and found this.
The pics then followed and then my post here
to see if what I had seen coincided with
what was happening in the gulf or elsewhere.


Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
What pesticides or fertilizers are you suing, if any, and how are they applied?
How has the weather been? More hot and humid than usual? Less?

No pesticides or fertilizers that I know of, but like I said.
It's not my garden. It belongs to my folks.
The weather has been extremely hot and humid
for this time of year.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by justadood
 




Unfortunately for the OP, the image is of a very well-developed tomato plant. Seeing as this is only early June, the lilihood of that even being a recent image is highly unlikely. Tomatoes do not look like that until august.


Unfortunately, with the record early heat of high 90's in FL, I am already starting to early signs of this on my tomatoes.


Anyhow, this thread was supposed to be about toxic rain and not about plant diseases, so I think its time to move on (being that damage in not chemical)..


[edit on 20-6-2010 by whatsup]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:17 PM
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Originally posted by kozmo
Don't know if this has been introduced yet, but this is Botrytis Blight - a type of fungus. I did not link to any fact shets as I would like you to Google it, look at the pics and the associated fact sheets and decide for yourself.

Boondock, you know full well that I ALWAYS have your back, but this time I disagree. I'm NOT saying that this isn't from the oil spill, or something else. But the pics look genuinely like Botrytis Blight to me. What do you all think?

I know you back me up bro and I appreciate it
and you may very well be right. It may be fungus, blight
or bacteria or mold or some other things as well.
You are more than welcome to scrutinize the
evidence. No matter .... we will still be friends.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:19 PM
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and let me state for the record, there are so many
posts here that there is no way I can possibly
respond to every single one so please forgive
me if I don't respond to yours. But be it known,
that I do read every one of them. I just don't
have the time to respond to each one. But I
do thank all of you for participating in this discussion.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by Hemisphere
All of the photos show signs of varied plant diseases and insect damage. The tomatoes look to have early blight or something along those lines. Very common. And there are other photos that look like black spot, powdery mildew, leaf miner damage, Japanese Beetles and so on.

I hope you are right
for all our sakes.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


Statesville, NC here...I just checked my plants outside my house and noticed the same thing with what you posted. Holes in the plants with a white crust around the holes. Also, tree leafs everywhere have spots. I am over 200 miles from your location...this is either wide spread issue or is coming in from rain.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by Stormdancer777
but have you ever seen it rain across the street and the sun is shining on your side, I imagine that it can be like that and not necessarily come down in every section.

u r correct
it has not affected every single bush or plant.
it is here and there, sporadic.
Earlier when I said it hit everything,
I meant that it hit different TYPES of
plants, not just one type. That is what
I meant.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
Unfortunately for the OP, the image is of a very well-developed tomato plant. Seeing as this is only early June, the lilihood of that even being a recent image is highly unlikely. Tomatoes do not look like that until august.

This is either a hoax, or a lot of naive people who dont know anything about plants.

Sorry to dissappoint. Feel free to call me a shill, now.

sorry to disappoint a professional farmer
but that pic of the tomato plant
was taken yesterday. Would you
like for me to take another pic
with today's newspaper date????

I am tired of being called a hoaxer
or a liar. If you think I am then get in
ur vehicle and come see for urself.



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