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Toxic Rain in North Carolina????

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posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by Aziroth
 


As others have noted: Insects and fungus. All of them. Anyone who has spent anytime in a garden next to their plants will see this over time. Black spot, Rust, powdery mildew, to much water, not enough water, and insects and their larvea in hosts uncountable.

Some plants and trees are more susceptable then others. Take Elm trees for example, do you know how many Moths and Butterflies use them as a host tree?

At any rate I will say again this is all natural.




posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:49 PM
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Never mind my Avitar with the clouds otherwise known as chemtrails. Hx3 gave me that pic a long time ago and its always been there. Cloudsinthesky has a completely different meaning other than chemtrails..........

With all that said............I have been following the gulf spill very closely. I have seen the news video from Mississippi as many of you have as well. I live in SW MO. I have a very large garden and a week ago the exact same thing started happening to my garden. I have been paying very close to wind currents coming from the gulf just for a "toxic rain" scenario. But to this date I have not seen the gulf stream bring up moisture to our area that may have enough toxic chemicals from BP's chemical dumping...........

So back to my problem and the OP's...........What is it ?.......I have no idea!! I just returned home from being out of town for a couple days. So far as of today I have lost 3 cucumber plants just like the OP's description and many plants have the white spots as decribed in stage 1 of the OP.....The corn has burnt holes in some of the stalks leaves.........

I did take a look at that news video out of Memphis and my plants do look like what I have seen in the video..........

My nieghbor has fruit trees and there other gardens in the area...........Its pretty hot today (heat index 106) so I will wait until this afternoon to investigate further damage to my garden as well aa nieghbors.

I will photograph if I see this outside my garden......



[edit on 20-6-2010 by Cloudsinthesky]

[edit on 20-6-2010 by Cloudsinthesky]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:55 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
Acid rain wouldnt only hit a few select leaves,

well that would depend on how concentrated
the acid is in the rain wouldn't it???



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 01:57 PM
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I live in NC myself...went and looked at every plant, tree, and bush I have outside, nothing like this on them. They are all still beautiful, if not being suffocated by this darn heat!
I really doubt it is what you claim it is.
-FCL



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:00 PM
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wat my interrest is... those filaments...wires floating in the water... wat is it ??????

http://(nolink)/bp-live-oil-spill-cam.html

look at ocean intervention ROV1 could it be ash from the burning at the surface???



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by ExPostFacto
reply to post by boondock-saint
 


Statesville, NC here...I just checked my plants outside my house and noticed the same thing with what you posted. Holes in the plants with a white crust around the holes. Also, tree leafs everywhere have spots. I am over 200 miles from your location...this is either wide spread issue or is coming in from rain.

maybe I'm not so looney after all

sorry to hear u have it too.
I hope this stuff is just something
simple that will not affect us all
in one way or another.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


I also noticed a lot of insect on the leaves. Groups of little red bugs, looks like baby lady bugs. And also some little gray bugs with black legs. That could be the cause as well.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by shapeshiftress
I am having a problem with the time line. You were eating, it smelled funny, you grabbed the camera, you noticed the damage in three different stages of developement and photographed it.
So how fast does it proceed from one stage to the next?
My folks raised peaches and spots on the leaves were fairly common.
We have had some unusal weather patterns, but seems like toxins would rain out closer to the Gulf.

u need to read the entire thread
time line has already been addressed.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by First Curiosity Last
I live in NC myself...went and looked at every plant, tree, and bush I have outside, nothing like this on them. They are all still beautiful, if not being suffocated by this darn heat!
I really doubt it is what you claim it is.
-FCL

there is a difference between claiming
and suspecting.

I am not claiming it is anything.
I am suspecting it could be a number
of things, including in that is chemicals
in the rain.

I would MUCH rather it be something
minor and our suspicions are wrong.
But I did post the thread to find out
the truth and there have been great
facts presented on a host of different
causes. And they all have validity so
how can you rule out chemicals
When MSM have reports in MS of
something killing crops and they
don't even know what it is at present?



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 02:39 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


So where in NC are you located?



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by boondock-saint
 


Sure, but like i said, acid rain isnt formed in the clouds. It forms when rain passes through clouds of industrial pollutants, etc.

I'm not necessarily saying this isnt happening. I'm mainly just saying that, in my experience, all the images presented look completely normal to me. Get evidence via a test of the rain water. I could fly to Montreal and get similar images from plants there. You people maybe just never looked at a plant before?




posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:07 PM
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Where in N.C?

I am ten minutes from Charlotte. I haven't notice anything like that with my plants.

[edit on 20-6-2010 by bigvanhorn]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by whaaa
The thing that prompts me to believe that this plant damage is something more than just simple insect and/or bacterial infection is all the new members coming on the boards saying "no problem, move along"........yeah right!

Odd they would show up just when we are in the first stages of an ecological disaster. Who are these guys?





Paranoid...maybe a little!

[edit on 20-6-2010 by whaaa]


Yes, I'm a secret government spy posing as an organic farmer pointing out that these images are completely normal. Also, no one in NC would have tomatoes that large, with fruit, out doors at this time of year.

Do an image search for various insect and mildew damage to any of the plants you are showing images of. You will see photos of the EXACT same damage associated with various normal, everyday causes.

Instead of calling me a shill, you could just do your homework...?

If I was a secret agent, I would be on here posting nonsense theories based on dubious, circumstantial evidence easily disputed by common sense. Sort of like the OP... Take a deep breath, THINK about the possibilities, and then come to an educate, non-hysterical conclusion.

Yes, this spill is a big deal. No, it is not effecting your plants. Yet. The 'evidence' shown so far is silly.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:25 PM
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more pics taken today

this first pic is a good example of
the 3 stages I was talking about as it
has all 3 in 1 pic. The white spots,
then the yellow burning and finally
the holes in the leaves.



I tried to go find the leaf that was in my final pic
yesterday but I could not find it. But I got a pic
of another leaf near it.




posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
Also, no one in NC would have tomatoes that large, with fruit, out doors at this time of year.

well for you and the other folks calling me a liar
about the tomato plants being large.

Here is a pic of a 5-foot tall tomato plant
on the property, right here in NC in June20
2010. This is a pic of one of the better plants
as this one wasn't hit. See how tall it is
compared to the chain link fence behind it.

[snip]




Mod Edit: Please Review the Following Link: Courtesy Is Mandatory


[edit on Sun Jun 20 2010 by DontTreadOnMe]



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by bigvanhorn
Where in N.C?

I have already answered this question
please read the thread.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by justadood
Also, no one in NC would have tomatoes that large, with fruit, out doors at this time of year.

Yeah? I've got tomatoes comming in and I'm in western North Carolina... up in the mountains at that, which is a whole agricultural zone apart from the OP, I could just be imagining them though.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 03:48 PM
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Hey OP, going back and looking at these latest pics and the first ones, those are some pretty serious holes. Of course, insects 'could' do this and BTW, they can also spread plant inspections, but??
Anyhow, have you looked carefully to see if there are any insects around and on these plants? Also, how long before this suspect rain event had it been before you had inspected these same plants? Finally, concerning this smell you mentioned, have you lived in the area long, and if not, are you sure there is not a nasty industrial source nearby, that when the winds are just right could have produced these smells?
Just trying to help you sort it out--



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by whatsup
Anyhow, have you looked carefully to see if there are any insects around and on these plants?

I did look for insects including worms, larvae
and beetles. I saw a few bugs and a few larvae
patches but not associated with these leaves
as they seem to be isolated from the events
discussed and they were very few compared
to the damage done.


Originally posted by whatsup
Also, how long before this suspect rain event had it been before you had inspected these same plants?

I have already stated that this was the first time
I checked these plants out was yesterday.
And then again today.


Originally posted by whatsup
Finally, concerning this smell you mentioned, have you lived in the area long, and if not, are you sure there is not a nasty industrial source nearby, that when the winds are just right could have produced these smells?

thanks for bringing this up as I wanted to clarify something
from a prior post as well. This was the first time I had
sat outside while it rained in a very long time so I had
not smelled rain for a while even though it had rained
here at least 6 times in the past couple week. Most of those
were thunderstorms and I didn't want to be struck by
lightning so I stayed inside during the other ones.
So this one was the first I had smelled that had the
odor. The other storms we had the past 2 weeks
may have had the odor but I didn't actually smell
them from being inside in the A/C.

As far as me living here. I have lived here
off and on since I was 6 yrs old. I am
46 now. I know there are hog farms nearby
and have smelled them just by walking
outside when I'm downwind. Don't need
rain for that. But this odor was different
than anything I have smelled before.
I have smelled different processing plants
in the area when I would travel, but nothing
like this.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 04:15 PM
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I live in southern NC below Charlotte. We have had no burning or holes here but that certainly doesn't mean you don't have a problem. How long after the rains did you start seeing stage one? Did the yellowing occur where the white spots were? The holes seem to be bigger than the areas affected by the white spots. It may be that the weak spots in the leaves attreacted bugs that ate holes. This often occurs when the plants health is comprimised. The tomatoes in your first pics look like they have Early Blight. This is caused by soil born fungus that is splashing up on the leaves from the soil when it rains. To prevent early blight, keep a deep mulch at the base of your plants and avoid top watering when possible.

The rest of the plants look like they possibly have a different kind of fungus. It starts out with white fuzzy spots and goes to yellow spots and then leaf drop. You can fight the fungus with a mixture of baking soda and water, with about 10 drops of grafefruit seed extract mixed in. This will really knock down fungus but don't spray the flowers on your veggies it will burn the blossoms and you'll get no fruit from the ones that the spray makes contact with. I spray with my hand over the blossoms, neither the baking soda notr the grapefruit seed oil will hurt you it is completely safe. If that helps then you know you have a fungus issue. You can use the baking soda alone if you cant get the grapefruit seed extract. Hope it helps.

[edit on 20-6-2010 by elle.mental]

[edit on 20-6-2010 by elle.mental]



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