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Words that just iritate the hell out of you.

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posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:19 AM
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a reply to: Monsieur Neary




figuatively


How do pronounce that?




posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:19 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah
I think "supper" was originally a late night thing. Victorian aristocrats would go down for supper in the middle of a ball, which probably puts it in the small hours of the morning.
I grew up on a pattern of school dinner at noon, a light uncooked tea after school, and supper just before going to bed. I was introduced to cooked evening meals in my college years, but abandoned the pattern afterwards.
The variations in name come about because "dinner" gradually shifted historically from midday through to the latter end of the afternoon (which seems to be a common habit in Dickens) and finally the evening.
While "lunch" was invented as a substitute name for whatever meal was being eaten at midday, some people evidently kept the habit of using "tea" or "supper" for the evening meal, even when it was a large one.
Which seems strange to people like you and me because we think of those names as attached to something lighter.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: fiverx313




two Rs in irritate


Well spotted



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:26 AM
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a reply to: Admitted

indeed methinks yo may be onto thumsing



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:28 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: Nyiah
I think "supper" was originally a late night thing. Victorian aristocrats would go down for supper in the middle of a ball, which probably puts it in the small hours of the morning.
I grew up on a pattern of school dinner at noon, a light uncooked tea after school, and supper just before going to bed. I was introduced to cooked evening meals in my college years, but abandoned the pattern afterwards.
The variations in name come about because "dinner" gradually shifted historically from midday through to the latter end of the afternoon (which seems to be a common habit in Dickens) and finally the evening.
While "lunch" was invented as a substitute name for whatever meal was being eaten at midday, some people evidently kept the habit of using "tea" or "supper" for the evening meal, even when it was a large one.
Which seems strange to people like you and me because we think of those names as attached to something lighter.



I think it would get lost on Americans but what are your thoughts on wearing a cardy?

Cardigan is a dreadful word and inspires images of old ladies in horrid cardigans that keep a bit of tissue up their sleeve and smell faintly of tcp.

When shortened it cardy it grates on me in a way that defies reason.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific
Never wore one. I was always given a "pully" (which is short for "pullover", as you know).
My Lincolnshire-born father would call it a "ganzer"- which probably comes from "Guernsey".




edit on 6-11-2017 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:51 AM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

thanks for reminding me

"your worshipfulness" the mayor

"your worship your honour" when addressing a judge

Why would you worship a mortal?



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:54 AM
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a reply to: WakeUpBeer



'Hella'


"hella vafella" is proper Australian strine. Translation: he's a hell of a great fellow

You leave our Ozzie strine alone.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:55 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight
"Worship" simply means "respect".
Are you unmarried? Have you never had to say "With my body I thee worship?"



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:59 AM
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a reply to: LightSpeedDriver



fritter


"fritter and waste..."




posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:04 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific



charecter


bad spellers irritate me, especially when they've created the thread



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:13 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: nonspecific



charecter


bad spellers irritate me, especially when they've created the thread


Sorry about that I had a nasty head smash a few years ago and the ability to spell fell out.

I have no spell checker on this laptop and am aware of how often I must write a word incorrectly.




posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:15 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: nonspecific
Never wore one. I was always given a "pully" (which is short for "pullover", as you know).
My Lincolnshire-born father would call it a "ganzer"- which probably comes from "Guernsey".





I was born in lincolnshire but never heard that one before, I was on the outskirts though and the further you go the odder it gets.

Lincolnshire has some of the ugliest placenames in the UK.

Scragglethorpe for example, it does not sound like the place you would want to visit does it?



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Brexit.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:30 AM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

It was an apparent concern of National Fire Protection Association

mentalfloss.com...



Why Do Flammable and Inflammable Mean the Same Thing? BY OREN HERSCHANDER JANUARY 21, 2015

Understand the wrong definition of inflammable and you might end up with more than an embarrassing situation while talking to your English professor. Inflammable and flammable are two words that are frequently misinterpreted. Some people mistake the words as having opposite meanings.

In reality, flammable and inflammable mean exactly the same thing—capable of burning. Inflammable is derived from the word inflame (sometimes spelled enflame), and precedes the invention of the word flammable. The first syllable, in, is often confused for the negative prefix in- which is like the latin prefix un- (see: inconspicuous, inescapable, indestructible, etc…).

The in- prefix in the case of inflammable is derived from the Latin prefix en-, meaning “to cause (a person or thing) to be in” (like enslave, encourage, etc…). With all this confusion behind the definition of the word inflammable, the National Fire Protection Association urged Americans in the 1920s to start using the word flammable to avoid confusion and prevent fires because they thought people may mistake inflammable as meaning not being able to burn.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:31 AM
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a reply to: PsychicCroMag

Or when a waiter says to a mixed couple "what can i get you guy's?"



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:34 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific
North Lincolnshire, it was.
Did you ever come across "Doo", which appears to mean "No" in a very dismissive sense, brushing aside a thought that isn't worth considering? That was one of the few bits of dialect that he retained unconsciously and automatically, as distinct from the occasional word he brought out with conscious zest.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:37 AM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss




phrase metrics.


I like you, I love your threads...but phrase metric?



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:40 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

I've always loved Han Solo's tongue in cheek use of "your worship" for dear Princess Leia.



edit on 6-11-2017 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 06:40 AM
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originally posted by: CJCrawley
a reply to: nonspecific

Brexit.


There was a sadly now banned member that hated that term so much he made a thread about it.

One of the most irritating things to be made up in my opinion.



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