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Words that just iritate the hell out of you.

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posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes
A similar example of ignorance is "reticent to speak"; since "reticent" means "reluctant to speak" (from TACEO, "I am silent"), the second half is unnecessary.



Ah, yes, the redundancy issue!! Other examples, "the ATM machine" - really, the automatic teller machine machine??? Urg! Another, my youngest told me she heard online, was "for your FYI" - for your for your information.....can I scream now??? Do people learn nothing anymore??




posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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originally posted by: Finspiracy
a reply to: nonspecific

I fully agree with you. Good post


I need to add one. Actually it is not a word it is a phrase. "I could care less" used in a context where one clearly means the subject does not matter to the writer at all. My first language is Finnish, i make mistakes in english all the time. But i couldn't care less


I am not even sure if that irritates me or makes me slightly amused or facepalm or what


I'd forgotten (perhaps I was trying to forget!) that one! Yes, indeed, the proper phrase, when one is not interested at all, is "I couldn't care less.", and people use the incorrect, "could care less" all the time! You are doing better than many who speak English as their native language!



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

It was an apparent concern of National Fire Protection Association

mentalfloss.com...



Why Do Flammable and Inflammable Mean the Same Thing? BY OREN HERSCHANDER JANUARY 21, 2015

Understand the wrong definition of inflammable and you might end up with more than an embarrassing situation while talking to your English professor. Inflammable and flammable are two words that are frequently misinterpreted. Some people mistake the words as having opposite meanings.

In reality, flammable and inflammable mean exactly the same thing—capable of burning. Inflammable is derived from the word inflame (sometimes spelled enflame), and precedes the invention of the word flammable. The first syllable, in, is often confused for the negative prefix in- which is like the latin prefix un- (see: inconspicuous, inescapable, indestructible, etc…).

The in- prefix in the case of inflammable is derived from the Latin prefix en-, meaning “to cause (a person or thing) to be in” (like enslave, encourage, etc…). With all this confusion behind the definition of the word inflammable, the National Fire Protection Association urged Americans in the 1920s to start using the word flammable to avoid confusion and prevent fires because they thought people may mistake inflammable as meaning not being able to burn.


Yes, it was, and you beat me to posting that. Still bothers me, though!! Teaching proper usage seems simpler to me, and I learned that one at home, since it wasn't taught in the schools even when I was in school back int he dinosaur days. I wonder if they had actual cases of people being in danger because they were confused, or if someone was worried over nothing.

Of course, that's a minor one, and the poor usage we see so much these days bothers me more! Plenty of examples of that, in the thread. To add to those, misuse of simple words, such as here/hear, there/their/they're, and that sort of thing. I learned the correct words back in the first grade. My kids all did as well, and we home school. Why are so many posting everywhere online using the wrong ones? I do love that the kids can listen to something on television, and notice the bad usage for what it is.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific
What a great thread!

Since I'm not a native English speaker, I don't have any "irritating" English words (though I have them in Russian), but some borrowings based on Latin or Greek ("homophobia", for instance) are really awkward ("homo" is supposed to mean "a man" in Latin and, at the same time, "same" in Ancient Greek, as far as I remember, so, in any case, a direct translation of "homophobia" has nothing to do with its accepted meaning, that's why the construction is wrong).

What irritates me a lot as a non-native speaker is misusing of the language by natives:

"Sorry folks, but if I would have relied on the Fake News of CNN, NBC, ABC, CBS, washpost or nytimes, I would have had ZERO chance winning WH"

I mean, what type of conditional is this?))
edit on 2017 by JedemDasSeine because: typo



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 02:15 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: PsychicCroMag

Or when a waiter says to a mixed couple "what can i get you guy's?"


That one, I think, is regional. When I was a kid, we lived in Tennessee, and used "ya'll" to talk about a group of people. A cousin who lived in Ohio always said, "you guys", instead, and we'd correct him all the time, stating we wee NOT guys. Drove us crazy!



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 02:44 PM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
a reply to: fiverx313

For tongue in cheek sometimes I do a hybrid "Y'all Guys".

"Y'all" rather annoying too.

Most of my years now spent in the deep deep south, I still cant bring myself to utter it unless either to talk specifically about it or use in tongue in cheek (as noted above, but sometimes I like to mix different slangs accents and foreign word translations in together in the same sentences).

My first year back here as an adult, at one lunch break I proposed: "If you all = y'all then shouldn't we all = w'all?".

Other southern vernacular includes "get er done", and the less noted but more brazen redneck permutation of "get er did".

Some northern vernacular that annoys southerners is "doorwall" (sliding glass door), "power washer" (pressure washer) and "hilo" (forklift).

Then another southerner word that bugs me is "buggy" (shopping cart). It seems like something that only should be said in Proper England.



I actually grew up calling a shopping cart a buggy!! It was what it was! (grin, duck, and run)



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
Then another southerner word that bugs me is "buggy" (shopping cart). It seems like something that only should be said in Proper England.

As far as I know, England currently uses the word "buggy"for the little pushchair for children which has replaced the old-style pram.
Did we pick that up from America?


edit on 6-11-2017 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific

originally posted by: CJCrawley
a reply to: nonspecific

Brexit.


There was a sadly now banned member that hated that term so much he made a thread about it.

One of the most irritating things to be made up in my opinion.


Who? And why was he banned?



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:01 PM
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My number one pet peeve word is utilize. Almost 90% of the time, use is perfectly OK to use, and most of the time the only reason the person writing the piece in question chose utilize is because they want to try sounding technical.

It's stupid!

First Annual. You can have the first one or an annual one, but if it's the first one, it's not an annual one yet because you have only had one.

everyday v. every day - No one can figure out when you should use one or the other.
kickoff v. kick off - No one can figure out when you should use one or the other (never hyphenate!).
anytime v. any time - No one can figure out when you should use one or the other.

Anything that should have an apostrophe ... or not but has one anyhow.

Stuff written in ALL CAPS!



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

"Stuff written in ALL CAPS!" But that is how you know someone is cool



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:08 PM
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originally posted by: Autorico
a reply to: ketsuko

"Stuff written in ALL CAPS!" But that is how you know someone is cool


Limited all caps is fine, but I am talking about my job.

THERE I AM LIKELY TO GET STUFF THAT IS INCONSEQUENTIAL AND WRITTEN IN ALL CAPS JUST LIKE THIS. IT IS A STRAIN ON THE EYES WHEN YOUR SPEED AND ACCURACY ARE MONITORED TO ADJUST TO EDITING ALL CAPS TEXT FOR PARAGRAPHS AT A TIME.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

See, you are much cooler now. Can you feel it?

PS. I can't believe they killed the curry thread



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 07:07 PM
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People who end sentences with ".....if you will" I hear it a lot from meteorologists. Example: "The cold front will pass through this evening, if you will, causing temps to drop." --- IF I WILL WHAT??

FYI and any other internet abbreviation that is so overused that it has become part of Spoken conversations. Not just typed.

People who say, "I seen it" in place of "I saw it" My wife is from Ohio and seems to be guilty of this one.

Funnilly enough.

When people pronounce words like "Heal, Feel, and Steal" as "Hill, Fill, and Still" Is it a southern thing, maybe?

"My Bad." It's a cop-out way of admitting a mistake without having to say that you are sorry.




edit on 6-11-2017 by EdwardDrake because: added more



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 07:12 PM
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a reply to: EdwardDrake

I like to use "if you will" sometimes, when I'm talking to someone, and I'm compelled to cut to a sinister narrative voice tone.

My old coworker he'd respond "I WONT!".




posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

"pulled" chicken thigh meat just came up in another thread.

I hate anytime I see this "pulled" meat fad.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

Jolly good ol' chap

signed
IgnoranceIsntBlisss



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

It is what it is

Come now, and let us reason together



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

beat you too it, page 7

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 08:04 PM
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a reply to: LadyGreenEyes




Yes, indeed, the proper


"indeed" or "yes" is redundant


hehehe...you did do it



wiki


indeed ɪnˈdiːd/Submit adverb 1. used to emphasize a statement or response confirming something already suggested. "it was not expected to last long, and indeed it took less than three weeks" synonyms: as expected, to be sure, in fact, in point of fact, as a matter of fact, in truth, truly, actually, really, in reality, as it happens/happened, certainly, surely, for sure, undeniably, veritably, nay, if truth be told, you could say; More 2. used to introduce a further and stronger or more surprising point. "the idea is attractive to many men and indeed to many women"



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

That's OK, someone was complaining about "indeed" up thread, and I have been known to use it in conversation from time to time.

All because of Lo Pan.





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