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Geothermal, Let's Get Real

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posted on May, 24 2015 @ 01:34 PM
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It is as cheap and as low carbon as it comes.



Today, year seven pupils are making a film about the project.
George Walker said he had learnt that coal was not a renewable substance, and added: "But back there at the drill, that water's renewable because its come from the core of the earth, where its really, really hot and can be used again and again."

www.bbc.co.uk...

The children had the idea of 'renewables' imprinted on their impressionable minds. Did the project fulfil the expectations?


Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability director Professor Paul Younger said back in 2011 he believed there was potential to create a renewable energy supply for large parts of the city with the borehole.

But Ms Standfield, said that while that has not been the case, the research outcomes have been extremely positive.

They include discoveries on the electrical conductivity of water at 2km deep, sucessfully locating and isolating Fell sandstone which is vital in geothermal retrieval and firmly establishing that Newcastle sits above a heat source, likely to extend from Cullercoats to Newburn.

www.chroniclelive.co.uk...

How renewable is a diesel powered drilling rig?

Well anyway. Let's move away from the Newcastle fail and take a look at.....


Plans unveiled for country's first commercial geothermal power source




There are already two one km deep boreholes which proved it to be one of the country's best spots for natural heat generation.

The boreholes will be extended to 3km, a depth where the water temperature is expected to exceed 120C.

Mr Percy, 26, the son of the Duke of Northumberland, added: "This temperature is hot enough to generate electricity, and still support other heat uses afterwards, such as a hydrothermal spa."
www.thenorthernecho.co.uk...

So how did "one of the country's best spots for natural heat generation" work out?



“We therefore hope that any subsequent site owner will view the boreholes as an asset and continue to support their use for research and development purposes.”
www.thenorthernecho.co.uk...

I've seen the wriggling from "It's fantastic renewable technology!" to "It's an idea we're hoping to improve" with ground source heat pumps. Is this a general bait and switch trick played throughout renewable trough guzzling society?

Looking for images of working geothermal projects I find Iceland, where steam comes out of the ground, and drawings. Anyone can produce illustrations that show what they want to happen. Reality will assert itself once drilling progresses.

Geothermal. Burning masses of diesel drilling a hole into our mother Earth for a system that might provide some return.

There is no replacement for nightmare nuclear, 'orrible oil or carcinogenic coal. We just have to use less. Much less.

Wear a wooly and take some exercise. That's the green way to keep warm.




posted on May, 24 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: Kester

Before I state this is the dumbest jab I have ever read at renewables I want to be sure I am reading this correctly.

Your argument seems to center around having to drill down to the power source.


How renewable is a diesel powered drilling rig?


Yet you seem to still advocate for oil which has to be drilled for and coal and uranium that has to be mined.



There is no replacement for nightmare nuclear, 'orrible oil or carcinogenic coal. We just have to use less. Much less.


Am I understanding you on that?
edit on 24-5-2015 by Grimpachi because: add



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

I'm the guy who blew the whistle on the cracks in the Ninian Central. I'm not exactly the oil industry's favourite. www.abovetopsecret.com...

Can you tell us about a working geothermal plant other than Iceland, (where steam come out of the ground?)

The renewables world is full of tricksters. I'd like to see something real. Solar panels work. Watch out for fakes and shoddy goods but apart from that get panels and batteries for independence. And I think that best illustrates my message, 'use less'. 12 volt lighting is sufficient for most household activities.

How many greenies stay in bed asleep while the sun is up on a summer morning, then burn electricity late at night when it's dark. The only thing that's going to work is actually changing your lifestyle. Use less of everything and forget the entitlement attitude that was born out of oil/coal/nuclear.
edit on 24 5 2015 by Kester because: paragraphs



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: Kester




Can you tell us about a working geothermal plant other than Iceland, (where steam come out of the ground?)

www.helcohi.com...
www.usgeothermal.com...
www.usgeothermal.com...
edit on 5/24/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Volcanic area? Thanks for the link but it looks like a 'steam comes out of the ground' type area.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: Kester
Did you bother reading?



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Your adding links faster than I can click my mouse!


The first commercial size binary cycle geothermal power plant in the world, a 7 gross megawatts dual pressure system using isobutane as the binary fluid, was successfully constructed, and tested at this site in 1980-1982. Although the 7 megawatts demonstration plant only produced electricity for several months on a test basis, the technology has since advanced to become the leading, proven technology for producing electrical power from moderate temperature geothermal resources in the world. There are currently 12 operating binary cycle plants in the Western United States, which produce 184 megawatts of electrical power.
The site is attractive because of the proven 300 degree Fahrenheit hot water resource that has been developed and tested, and because of the significant infrastructure facilities that are currently in place.


Sounds like a good spot. Is it near a built up area or is there an extensive distribution network across many miles?

The good spots are obviously the best to pursue.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: Kester




Can you tell us about a working geothermal plant other than Iceland, (where steam come out of the ground?)



Coasta Rica






edit on 24-5-2015 by Grimpachi because: pic



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: Kester


The good spots are obviously the best to pursue.

Yes.

Not much point in geothermal in bad spots.
Not much point in drilling for oil in bad spots either, for that matter.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Yep. Sounds like another good spot. www.onlinenevada.org...

The San Emidio Desert is an area of major displacement of a fault southwest of Gerlach, Nevada. Geothermal potential in the San Emidio Desert was unknown until the late 1960s, when exploration drilling for sulfur along the east side of the desert encountered hot water. An approximately 4.4 km long zone, presumably the surface expression of a fault, exhibited hydrothermal alteration and the presence of mercury and sulfur, but no surface springs were present. Water in shallow drill hole–1 m below ground surface–had a temperature of 53C. Thus, the San Emidio geothermal resource was concealed until discovered by drilling for sulfur.


So we're OK with geothermal if your residential or commercial areas are within reach of a good spot. How common are good spots for geothermal? Good spots close to existing areas 'needing', (wanting), power? Or do we move the cities.

Just trying to be practical.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Kester

Drilling into a major displacement of a fault sounds like a great idea.
What could possibly go wrong?
edit on 24 5 2015 by Kester because: spacing



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Kester
Being practical means making best use of available energy sources. In areas suitable for geothermal power, geothermal power can be used. In areas with suitable wind conditions, wind can be used. It is not one size fits all.

Ocean energy works well, should everyone move to the coast?

edit on 5/24/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Japan is clearly a volcanic area.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: Kester

Good observation. So is New Zealand. Good places for geothermal power.



edit on 5/24/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I can quote a researcher from the UK's leading wave energy centre. "Everything we build ends up smashed on the beach."

You have hit the nail right on the head. Geothermal works where geothermal works. It's not an automatic solution as suggested by hopeful thinkers.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:31 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: Grimpachi

Japan is clearly a volcanic area.





posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: Kester




It's not an automatic solution as suggested by hopeful thinkers.


Well, there are dreamers who don't know a lot and then there are those who know something about it. Those that know something about it know that geothermal, like other alternatives, is appropriate in some locations and not others.

What exactly is your point?



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Green thinkers here say, "We can use geothermal". It doesn't appear to be suitable here.



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

This pretty coloured diagram is an advertising gimmick. Advertising benefits drillers and researchers. The reality is discovered when the drilling stops. Suddenly the story changes to, 'We thought it might work and we can still go on trying if you give us more money.'

Money pays for slick advertising.
edit on 24 5 2015 by Kester because: punctuation



posted on May, 24 2015 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: Kester

In Great Britain? Maybe not. Or Maybe so. Geothermal steam is not the only source of geothermal energy.
www.bgs.ac.uk...



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