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Geothermal, Let's Get Real

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posted on May, 25 2015 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: aorAki

The information is being fed to the readers. 2,372 guests here now who might look in. Don't be so self centered.




posted on May, 25 2015 @ 04:51 PM
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I have a buddy in Canada who is using geothermal energy for heating, and powering a home generator in the event of power outages. It's not on an area-wide level, granted, it's just for them, but they'll never have to worry about power losses or going cold in the dead of winter again. From what i remember of the up-front cost, it wasn't horribly expensive in the long-run, either. All said & done, it cut their winter heating costs in far northern Canada for the projected rest of their lives by half. Good investment, from what i can make of it.

Instead of poo-pooing the entire geothermal idea, maybe it's something that should be looked at by region & where it's most abundant & best applicable. You know, like the bitterly cold "Canadian Wastes", so to speak.



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

The nature of the property and the local environment greatly affects the efficiency of the system.

Here there are more bad GSHP stories than good. Installers have taken advantage of 'green' enthusiasm to sell unsuitable and badly installed systems.

Rocket mass stoves are a practical solution to heating in Britain but, where do you put the meter?



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

If it's a coil GSHP system they may find the return diminishes with time as the surrounding ground loses heat over the years.

This is one of the areas that reality triumphs over calculations. In the calculations the warmth migrates back from the surrounding area and the system goes on working. In reality the ground from which the warmth has been drawn can take much longer to return to background temperature levels.

If it goes on working that's great. We had a good system as our second system. It worked fairly well while many others installed at the same time never heated the houses sufficiently. But then it started whining and when we reported it the tired voice at the end of the phone made it clear this wasn't surprise news. 5 years life for a unit advertised at 25 years is fraud. It's the 25 years projected life that justifies the 'green' label.

This is a lower tech heating solution.



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 05:21 PM
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a reply to: Kester

you dont need :


where steam comes out of the ground


so stop pulling " facts " out of your arse

geothermal would work in many areas in the UK - derbyshire is one - matlock // matlock bath [ hint clue in name ] is a perfect example

PS - at low [ sub 100 degree ] temps - using a low boiling point liquid in the primary loop increases efficiency [ if attempting electrical generation by turbine ]



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 05:28 PM
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originally posted by: ANNED
Geothermal is not clean.

You have sulfuric acid, hydrogen sulfide, large amounts of CO2,and mercury, in the steam known as non condensable gases.

And they can cause earthquakes due to the fracking needed to get high steam flow.
I worked at the Coso geothermal power plants in calif doing construction for about 2 years.
themilitaryengineer.com...


www.renewableenergyworld.com...

It's clean and sustainable.



Here reality meets greenwashing.
The experienced ATS contributor tells it like it is.
The Renewable Energy World tells it like a fairytale.
edit on 25 5 2015 by Kester because: spacing



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

It hasn't worked. That's the point.



posted on May, 25 2015 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
Here reality meets greenwashing.
The experienced ATS contributor tells it like it is.
The Renewable Energy World tells it like a fairytale.


Here's a real, do-able and zero carbon emission (from the point where it is turned on, not counting construction) idea;

Undersea volcanoes. There are loads of them gushing out superheated water into the deep ocean. All one needs to do is build / convert an existing oil platform to sit over the top of one of these. Then put down a very well insulated piping system to a heat exchanger and circulate cool water down and let the steam come back up to run turbines on the platform. You probably wouldn't even need to pump the water to circulate it, because cold naturally falls and hot naturally rises, the whole concept rides on efficient insualation on the heated water side to work and therefore no moving parts are needed to keep the steam cycle going.

Lay some cables back to the mainland grid and voila, you have a cheap never ending electricity supply that would only emit water vapour .
edit on 25-5-2015 by markosity1973 because: (no reason given)



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