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past and present black secrets

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posted on Feb, 6 2015 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Yay I'm not crazy.

Wouldn't the angle of the blades literally push air in past the width of the blade? Air molecules that end up directly under the leading edge just need to slip dorsally and now we have an air molecule inside the engine itself, albeit one that may not be moving until another air molecule gets slipped in and displaces it.

And if the air is already coming towards the inlet would it even matter?

a reply to: Zaphod58

Hehe, I used "discontinuous" to try and convey my thoughts on the turbulence, but not everyone is as nerdy as me
edit on 6-2-2015 by framedragged because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 01:42 AM
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a reply to: [post=18972093]Zaphod58[/post
Nice tongue in cheek dance of the seven veizaph....

To be hhonest my possible discovery about the nature of upgrades it takes to get exactly the combination of reductions in stages, length, diameter, AND intake airflow while keeping thrust the same as currently installed best in class engines and reducing fuel consumption was a major hint at which parts of the turbine needed to get a major improvement.

Combine that with my haunting of diy turbine forums combined with hours of puzzling over sepp hasselbergers site and the patent drawings he has, and a brain predisposed towards pattern recognition caused an ah ha moment. I have a suspicion that I'm not as certain of that I may have stumbled into a sister technology to another key piece of the upgrade that allows a much wider range of efficient operations.

Now .... the f35 radar and submarine technology/ explanation of a very perplexing and suboptimal design choice continuing to be made decades after it was well known that it's a mistake. That one all I'm really going to say is I'm nearly certain that the same phenomena is responsible for turning the f35's radar into a weapon and giving submarines a weapon that only recently has begun being even speculated about in the non conspiracy white world...

I really don't know that anymore needs to be said until I nail down the ramifications of my theory and or disprove it. At which point I'll gladly share what I thought I figured out so you guys can laugh at me.



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 01:47 AM
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a reply to: roguetechie

Speaking of submarines...



The researchers designed a "bubble meta-screen," a soft layer of silicone rubber that is only 230 microns thick, which is a little more than twice the average width of a human hair. The bubbles inside were cylinders measuring 13 microns high and 24 microns wide, and separated from each other by 50 microns.

In underwater experiments, the scientists bombarded a meta-screen placed on a slab of steel with ultrasonic frequencies of sound. They found that the meta-screen dissipated more than 91 percent of the incoming sound energy and reflected less than 3 percent of the sound energy. For comparison, the bare steel block reflected 88 percent of the sound energy.

Link

Pretty neat...I'm surprised no one thought of this before. Or, maybe they have...?



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 07:46 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom

Pretty neat...I'm surprised no one thought of this before. Or, maybe they have...?


Well, that and active skin. Sonic metamaterials are badass.



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

So, we have EM & sonic meta-materials...what about electronic meta-materials? What are the implications of electron cloaking for the MIC?



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: Tajlakz
a reply to: Bedlam

So, we have EM & sonic meta-materials...what about electronic meta-materials? What are the implications of electron cloaking for the MIC?


Nothing immediately comes to mind, but I'm sort of tired now.

What if you could make neutron or gamma ray metamaterials? Bend radiation around you. Finally get rad suits that work.

I wonder if [redacted]

Whoa. Hey, mbkennel! Want to do an ATS first? We can do a nationwide "born secret" project development live on ATS, and have thousands of people have to sign an NDA.
Everyone participate in a gagged patent.


Here you go, group 220.

That mystery boom you'd hear would be my clearance going away.



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

In order to re-route gammas, wouldn't you have to make meta-material units as small as the gamma wavelengths? Is that even theoretically possible?



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 07:51 PM
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originally posted by: Tajlakz
a reply to: Bedlam

In order to re-route gammas, wouldn't you have to make meta-material units as small as the gamma wavelengths? Is that even theoretically possible?


I don't know. It would be challenging. But man, would you get paid for it.



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 08:13 PM
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originally posted by: Tajlakz
a reply to: Bedlam

In order to re-route gammas, wouldn't you have to make meta-material units as small as the gamma wavelengths? Is that even theoretically possible?


Sure, as soon as we have engineerable neutron stars.

But seriously neutron diffraction (where de Broglie wavelength is long compared to atomic separations) is a long-standing technique employing coherent scattering, assuming you get cold neutron sources.

I guess you could engineer crystals to do something interesting to neutrons of a certain monochromatic energy but I don't see it being particularly useful.

The really high energy ones that you care about that really ryang up your DNA and all that....that's a toughie
edit on 7-2-2015 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 08:34 PM
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originally posted by: mbkennel
The really high energy ones that you care about that really ryang up your DNA and all that....that's a toughie


Screw the DNA. If you could engineer a metamaterial that could reflect thermal neutrons I could retire. If you can modulate the reflectivity from 0 to 100% with an external electric field, I can buy Little Bokeelia to retire on.



posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 11:05 PM
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originally posted by: mbkennel

But seriously neutron diffraction (where de Broglie wavelength is long compared to atomic separations) is a long-standing technique employing coherent scattering, assuming you get cold neutron sources.

I guess you could engineer crystals to do something interesting to neutrons of a certain monochromatic energy but I don't see it being particularly useful.


Heh, I've been wondering if I can get away with proposing a de Broglie meta-material for my master's project lol. I mean, it can not work and it'll still get me the degree hah.



posted on Feb, 8 2015 @ 02:04 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: mbkennel
The really high energy ones that you care about that really ryang up your DNA and all that....that's a toughie


Screw the DNA. If you could engineer a metamaterial that could reflect thermal neutrons I could retire. If you can modulate the reflectivity from 0 to 100% with an external electric field, I can buy Little Bokeelia to retire on.


Modulatable, hard to do. Isootpically pure graphene in zillions of precise layers? Neutrons have a magnetic moment that you might be able to exploit somehow. Maybe you could do tricks with polarized neutrons against polarized targets, seems like a delicate experiment.

What's the application? Mister Fission in your DeLorean? I think they've studied naval nukes pretty effectively by now.

I've found this:

Plasmonically Cloaked and Metamaterial Neutron Scintillators

inlportal.inl.gov...

but it appears to be using metamaterials to reduce gammas (!) to get cleaner neutron detection.



edit on 8-2-2015 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-2-2015 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-2-2015 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2015 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: mbkennel

Wouldn't one way to create artificial gravity be create an artificial neutron star core for a spaceship?



posted on Feb, 8 2015 @ 09:07 PM
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originally posted by: mbkennel

but it appears to be using metamaterials to reduce gammas (!) to get cleaner neutron detection.




HA! Told you! Now if you had a few layers of that...



posted on Feb, 8 2015 @ 09:19 PM
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originally posted by: mbkennel
What's the application?



Like all my other hobby projects. Big-ba-da-boom!

Neutron reflectors suck ass, in terms of actual reflectivity. You get a really good one, especially one I can modulate with a signal of some sort, I can make you a golfball nuke.

Since there aren't any elements that make especially good reflectors by themselves, we need to look at structure that does the job synthetically. A possibility might be a metamaterial construct. A 100% efficient neutron reflector would enable an arbitrarily small nuke. You wouldn't need boost gas, either, nor compression drivers, nor an initiator, so right off you've got your no-maintenance spec too.

O'course, if you had a metamaterial structure that shielded its contents from external neutrons that was switchable, you could use it to make a crappy but interesting nuke, by hiding part of a critical mass. It wouldn't be nearly as useful as a 100% reflector, but it could be made to work.

Or you could put it to use in some namby-pamby civilian way by filling a reaction cylinder with d-t mix and adding in some fissile uranium, the uranium would fiss like a..well, bomb, and the d-t might light up enough to ignite.
edit on 8-2-2015 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 01:20 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: mbkennel
What's the application?



Like all my other hobby projects. Big-ba-da-boom!

Neutron reflectors suck ass, in terms of actual reflectivity. You get a really good one, especially one I can modulate with a signal of some sort, I can make you a golfball nuke.




I want to live Star Trek. Not Doctor Strangelove.



Since there aren't any elements that make especially good reflectors by themselves, we need to look at structure that does the job synthetically. A possibility might be a metamaterial construct. A 100% efficient neutron reflector would enable an arbitrarily small nuke. You wouldn't need boost gas, either, nor compression drivers, nor an initiator, so right off you've got your no-maintenance spec too.


How much pressure would this great metamaterial engineered thing be able to withstand until it cracked? Nowhere near enough, so I think you still need rapid violent compression to boom.




Or you could put it to use in some namby-pamby civilian way by filling a reaction cylinder with d-t mix and adding in some fissile uranium, the uranium would fiss like a..well, bomb, and the d-t might light up enough to ignite.


again, containment? Your D and your T have to have a few thousand angstrom "near misses" (without losing significant energy) until they hit head-on enough to fuse.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 01:22 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: mbkennel

Wouldn't one way to create artificial gravity be create an artificial neutron star core for a spaceship?


There'd be nothing artificial about the gravity. Of course, the core of neutron star is going to go in whatever direction it is going at a millisecond before and will keep on going that same direction and not take any human advice.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 01:48 AM
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a reply to: mbkennel

Well I guess all you'd need to create gravity on a spaceship would be something incredibly dense to create gravity, why I was thinking a chunk of a neutron star core. Way out there technology I realize...



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: mbkennel


I want to live Star Trek. Not Doctor Strangelove.


Now, what better way to go out than riding a nuke and yelling 'yeehaw!'?




How much pressure would this great metamaterial engineered thing be able to withstand until it cracked? Nowhere near enough, so I think you still need rapid violent compression to boom.


Not at all! As the reflectivity goes to 100%, the critical mass drops exponentially to zero. As I'm not planning for a perfect material, so I'd say "very small" might be possible. Plus, the reflector, while it lasts, will really poke that reaction up something fierce, as it will stay supercritical as all hell until the radiation toasts the metamaterial.



again, containment? Your D and your T have to have a few thousand angstrom "near misses" (without losing significant energy) until they hit head-on enough to fuse.


You and your 'radiation equilibrium'. Mr Wet Blanket. Besides, you've always got to put a dual use on, I'm scratching for one.



posted on Feb, 9 2015 @ 10:21 AM
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originally posted by: mbkennel

There'd be nothing artificial about the gravity. Of course, the core of neutron star is going to go in whatever direction it is going at a millisecond before and will keep on going that same direction and not take any human advice.


How much neutron star do you have to have to keep the neutrons from decaying into hydrogen?



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