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Missing Plane Air Asia

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posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:03 AM
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It almost looks like another ostentatious winter solstice sacrifice.
Not Russian, not American but international evil it is.
A war on Indonesian Pancasila oneness.
OR an accident (if such thing exists)
edit on 28/12/2014 by PapagiorgioCZ because: must be filled out

edit on 28/12/2014 by PapagiorgioCZ because: Your reason for the edit (must be filled out):




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:18 AM
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a reply to: Thebel




11:10 GMT:
Flight QZ5801 dispatch information has been made public. It shows the plane took off with 8,296 kg of fuel, substantially more than the planned consumption for the flight - 5211 kg.


This is totally normal when there is weather along the route or destination.

The Captain after due consideration calls dispatch and request them to add "X" gallons/pounds/liters/ to the total fuel on board which then may generate a new flight plan altitude and certainly generates new takeoff / landing numbers.

" Dispatch this is the Captain for flight 1234.. I would like to add 3000 pounds of fuel due to weather along my route".

"Roger Captain I have been looking at that weather and I concur 3000 is a good idea; I will have the Fueler add the extra".

Adding extra fuel is just one less thing the Captain has to worry about when deviating around or having to hold due to weather.. No one wants to get to a destination only having fuel fumes remaining... Increases pucker factor exponentially and in a normal situation it does not happen..


edit on 28-12-2014 by 727Sky because: is



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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A few people here are saying that "not everything can be found instantly, it takes time to find a plane", well I lost my iphone last year and using that simple bit of tech 'Find My Phone' I was able to track it to my friends house within minutes and recover it".

I get it, the scenario is a little different however, considering there are around 100 million iphones worldwide and most of which can be tracked instantly, and only around 30,000 planes I would expect that more time and effort would have been implemented into technology that enables you to track a plane. I bet most of the passengers on the plane have iphones aswell, which ironically we can track, better than the plane itself (apparently).



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:27 AM
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a reply to: EndOfDays77

The hell it did. It showed a stall due to bad air data to the pilots.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:30 AM
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Sorry for off topic.

We in malaysia does not have much time to help or alert for any news regarding the Airasia tragedy. It's because, we're having the biggest flood right now since 1980s. Almost 3/4 states affected with flood in Peninsular Malaysia. More than 100,000 peoples evacuated from their home and flooding reaching 3rd floor. Now between 28 Dec to 2 Jan, we're preparing a second wave of flood. Strangely, the peak hours happened on the 26th Dec, where it's already 10 years since the Banda Aceh tsunami. For the current flood, you guys can see the pics in this forums:

mforum.cari.com.my...

mforum.cari.com.my...

They said, the flood happened because of the 'New Moon'.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:53 AM
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Singapore has sent at least one C-130, and Australia has offered a P-3 for when the search resumes.

The aircraft had 23,000 hours on it, the captain over 6,000 hours, and the first officer over 2,200 hours.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:07 AM
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This is getting more and more scary. If no wreckage is found, then it is surely an attack on the plane by either a super power testing out its latest weapon, or an alien attack. The alien attack cannot be ruled out as nonsense for two reasons. First, there was storm activity in that area at that time, and we all now know that UFOs gather at these areas to harvest energy. The plane could have flown straight into a UFO which subsequently destroyed the plane. Second, this area is known to have several undersea UFO bases. As far back as 200 years ago, fishermen working in this area have reported massive UFOs rising out of the sea and shooting off. In one instance, a UFO rose out of the sea so close to a fishing vessel, that the wake produced nearly caused the boat to flounder. The fishermen called these UFOs " jinns." But the great mystery remains, " why only airlines from Malaysia ?"



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: carlosox

So it couldn't be the storm that it flew into, no it was the aliens harvesting energy from those storms..



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

Must be russia...



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: southbeach

And yet CRM was a contributing factor to the Asiana crash at SFO, precisely because of that mentality.

So it was addressed. That doesn't mean it was fixed.
edit on 12/28/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: southbeach

No.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:26 AM
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Some more information on AirAsia.

www.bbc.co.uk...


Now one of Asia's most successful carriers, AirAsia was once a struggling Malaysian government-owned company.

In 2001, former music executive Tony Fernandes bought the heavily-indebted firm for a token sum of 25 cents.

Keeping the brand name, he created Asia's first low-cost airline, taking on local established rivals such as Malaysia Airlines and Australia's Qantas.

With the slogan "Now Everyone Can Fly", AirAsia now covers approximately 100 destinations across more than 15 countries, although many of these flights are serviced by associates and subsidiaries that use the company's brand name.

The boss of AirAsia Group, Tony Fernandes, is also chairman of Queens Park Rangers football club in the UK

AirAsia's business model is similar to other so-called budget airlines. It offers no business or first class seats, and the average fare is roughly 170 Malaysian ringgit (£30; $48).

In the three months to the end of September, the AirAsia group made a pre-tax profit of 26.5m Malaysian ringgit (£4.8m; $7.6m), and carried almost 5.3 million passengers.

Indonesia AirAsia was set to float on the stock market in the last couple of years, but rising costs and the depreciation of the country's rupiah currency against the US dollar have delayed such a move.

Airbus says the A320 used on flight QZ8501 had accumulated some 23,000 flight hours over 13,600 flights.

AirAsia's brand image is closely tied with its chief executive, Malaysian entrepreneur Tony Fernandes, who took over operations in 2001. Almost always in jeans and an AirAsia cap when interviewed, Mr Fernandes was seen as Malaysia's answer to Richard Branson.

In the same way that Mr Branson took on the dominance of British Airways in the 1980s, Mr Fernandes wanted to compete with established long-haul carriers in the region - like Malaysia's own flag carrier, Malaysian Airlines.

He's listed as one of the richest men in Malaysia and has always been adept at spinning his marketing message out to the media. With this plane's disappearance, he's wasted no time in tweeting out messages of support to the family and has already arrived in Surabaya along with members of the Indonesian affiliate of AirAsia.

edit on 28-12-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:35 AM
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originally posted by: angryhulk
A few people here are saying that "not everything can be found instantly, it takes time to find a plane", well I lost my iphone last year and using that simple bit of tech 'Find My Phone' I was able to track it to my friends house within minutes and recover it".

I get it, the scenario is a little different however, considering there are around 100 million iphones worldwide and most of which can be tracked instantly, and only around 30,000 planes I would expect that more time and effort would have been implemented into technology that enables you to track a plane. I bet most of the passengers on the plane have iphones aswell, which ironically we can track, better than the plane itself (apparently).


Of course, your iphone was in the midst of a dense network of microwave towers that need to be able to track individual phones in order to connect them. The airplane was hundreds of miles from the nearest radio tower, and was being tracked by a transponder that may only have been picked up by a single tracking station, making it possible to get a compass bearing but not an exact location. (Pings from two stations would be necessary for that.) It would then take time to organize a search party, which was probably delayed due to rough weather, which itself would make spotting any wreckage problematical.

It's not like walking down the street to pick up your phone at your friend's house.
edit on 28-12-2014 by DJW001 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:35 AM
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There are obviously conspiracies around the recent Malaysian plane incidents. Coincidence or not, the stats suggest there could be something at play.

www.economist.com...


Air-traffic controllers lost contact with flight QZ8501 a little less than 45 minutes after it took off from Surabaya, Indonesia's second-largest city, on a two-hour hop to Singapore. It is feared that the 162 people on board have died.

Information about the aircraft’s fate is still scant. One certainty is that it was caught in storms: Indonesian authorities say the pilot requested permission to rise above towering clouds shortly before contact was lost. Radar images circulating on social media—purportedly leaked from an air-traffic control screen—suggest that the plane then began to climb at a speed that may have been slow enough to cause it to stall. At the moment there is no evidence that the plane was deliberately brought down.

Tony Fernandes, AirAsia's British-Malaysian boss, has flown to Surabaya to meet the families of the passengers. Founded in 1996, AirAsia is a hugely popular low-cost carrier; for years it was among the world’s fastest growing airlines. From its headquarters in Kuala Lumpur it oversees a bevy of subsidiaries which fly to 22 countries (the group owns 49% of AirAsia Indonesia, which operates flight QZ8501). Its 170-odd red-liveried planes are all Airbus A320s, a reliable and safe model used by airlines around the world.

This has been a tragic year for South-East Asian air travel. Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 remains lost, nine months after it disappeared in the Indian Ocean; in September 298 people died when Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down over eastern Ukraine. The latest incident will probably not much dent booming demand for air travel in the region, as rising incomes encourage more people to ditch ferries for a seat in the skies. But it will doubtless weigh heavily on AirAsia, which has lately begun to struggle against growing competition and increasing costs.

edit on 28-12-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth

There could be, but at the same time, from 1952-2014, there have been 19 times a single airline has lost multiple aircraft in a short time. That includes five Comets from BOAC from 1952-54, and twice when Pan Am lost three 707-300s in less than a year (since this aircraft is from Malaysia too).

Airbus also has a history of pitot tubes freezing, leading to stalls and near stalls. If they did climb slowly that could be an indication of that.
edit on 12/28/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth

March 8s

Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 remains lost(239 people on board), nine months after it disappeared in the Indian Ocean;


Nine months??



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:52 AM
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New theory. All 3 of the missing airliners and their people are all alive, and the Antichrist will unveil them claiming he saved them or something of the like.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: SamsonStrength

Three? There are only two. MH370 and this one. The other Malaysian plane was shot down.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:58 AM
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a reply to: czariss

stay safe



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 09:05 AM
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I still can't belive after all this time not 1 body or scrap debris has washed up from MH370.







 
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