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Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

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posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

I still don't think that was him and that the real transport happened elsewhere or at a different time.

If Brantley's story in Africa isn't true, why should we believe this one given all of the strange details?
edit on 4-8-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: gatorclay97
People, you need to read about this before you comment, he contracted it will working with a ministry helping with the Sierra Leone Ebola outbreak, he was flown on a medical jet, to the US, and has been in biosafety level 3 lock down since stepping off the plane. Level 3 biosafety lockdown basically is armed guards in a sealed bulletproof ambulance. We are relatively safe, besides, any major hospital has the capacity to deal with small ebola outbreaks, and if that doesn't work the CDC has contingency plans to lockdown an entire state if needed.


Ebola is BSL-4.

The ambulance was bulletproof? Um okay.


edit on 8/4/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

Yeah, these photos really make me feel like they really had that protocol buttoned down.





Freakin' gravel and piled lumber.....Just walking on his own with only one guy assisting.

And who vetted these guys?




edit on 4-8-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:11 PM
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With regard to the second patient, Writebol...is she coming tomorrow? Or any other weekday this week?

Because it's one thing to transport a patient through ATL on a Saturday morning. It's a helluva whole other thing to do so on a weekday, especially during the first week of school, in the metro area - total gridlock. Even on an average day .

Brantly's ambulance barely had an escort and was stopping at redlights.
By all means, let's add school busses to the mix.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:12 PM
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a reply to: loam

I'm waiting for tomorrow to see the FBI escort the second patient. I'm pretty damn sure that the backtalk about lack of security on the first transport fell on listening ears.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

Tomorrow around noon. Same route. Being broadcast again for all the world to hear.

originally posted by: ~Lucidity rush hour is ALL day. Good point about the buses. And now the FBI will be there. Gee I wonder why? A threat maybe, or the backtalk mentioned above?


edit on 8/4/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:16 PM
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I've been in ATL completing my PHD for the past few months and plan on bugging out if something goes wrong en route...I've lost out on a PHD before...I can do it again. :-)

a reply to: ~Lucidity



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko
I get that. We're ready to shelter in place...for a long while
A PhD in virology by any chance?



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:23 PM
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originally posted by: gatorclay97
People, you need to read about this before you comment, he contracted it will working with a ministry helping with the Sierra Leone Ebola outbreak, he was flown on a medical jet, to the US, and has been in biosafety level 3 lock down since stepping off the plane. Level 3 biosafety lockdown basically is armed guards in a sealed bulletproof ambulance. We are relatively safe, besides, any major hospital has the capacity to deal with small ebola outbreaks, and if that doesn't work the CDC has contingency plans to lockdown an entire state if needed. Oh and in a U.S. intensive care unit, (aka: a hospital) survivability is bumped from 90% deathrate, to about 50%, that means he has a good chance at surviving.


OK...then explain about the breaking story today (I posted it earlier in this thread) of the medi jet stopping over in Maine for refueling and the crew hopping out to stretch their legs, mingling and chatting with the ground crew, who were not in any protective gear at all.

Des



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:31 PM
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originally posted by: gatorclay97
People, you need to read about this before you comment, he contracted it will working with a ministry helping with the Sierra Leone Ebola outbreak, he was flown on a medical jet, to the US, and has been in biosafety level 3 lock down since stepping off the plane. Level 3 biosafety lockdown basically is armed guards in a sealed bulletproof ambulance. We are relatively safe, besides, any major hospital has the capacity to deal with small ebola outbreaks, and if that doesn't work the CDC has contingency plans to lockdown an entire state if needed. Oh and in a U.S. intensive care unit, (aka: a hospital) survivability is bumped from 90% deathrate, to about 50%, that means he has a good chance at surviving.


There's 68 pages before your post. What makes you think we haven't read everything we can find, and read it all again, in attempts to understand what is going on.

68 pages of research, discussion, postings by many medical professionals.

I suggest you may have missed a bit in those 68 pages you skipped over, to post what you did.

Des


edit on 4-8-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:41 PM
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originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: adnanmuf
You just Google pig is universal host or reservoir. And Google Ebola reston. I learned about pig in Med school before 1984 before there was internet. I am not gonna google for you. Do your research before you make silly statements like your no 2 fact crazyewok!


I'm a real MD with credentials. You cannot even speak English. Please enlighten me.

...this matters because real doctors speak English, right?


In Canada, certainly.

Don't get sick in Quebec, then. You might not make any friends.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: JohnnyCanuck
If he gets sick in Quebec, we'll come rescue him and bring him home!



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: JohnnyCanuck

Don't get sick in Quebec, then. You might not make any friends.


Don't get sick in Quebec unless you're from Quebec. They don't take any other provinces' health card.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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So poor Samaritan purse could have furnished 100. Volunteers. With the cost of the jet.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: NavyDoc

I understand that you wouldnt want positive pressure of a suit containing an infectious patient. Any small pinhole would blast potentially infectious air out into the external environment. If the michelin man had gotten out of the ambulance i would already be running for the hills (or in my case, the deep swamp...im in that third world country called New Orleans
) instead of just watching to see *when* I need to start building the clean room.

My issue is why risk using the suit at all? The mere act of a patient egressing the ambulance under their own power is a terrible risk. A snag on the metal step, a slip, hell, even a twist in the wrong direction could tear a zipper and congratulations, we now have a containment breach. If it had been me in charge, Brantley would have been in the suit, zipped up nice and snug inside of a gurney-mounted containment tent, escorted by gloved/masked/goggled nurses in sufficient number to maintain control in case of loss of stability (i.e a gurney wheel shearing off) until Brantley was safely secured inside of the isolation room.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: Destinyone


We are discussing ebola, and the ramifications of how, and when, and why it spreads. Not here to answer your repetitive questions.


Ebola: Ebola is a rare but deadly infection that causes bleeding inside and outside the body.

How is it Spread: By bodily fluids

When is it Spread: After patients are symptomatic, after patients die from the disease, and possibly for days after symptoms disappear.

Why is it Spread: Poor infectious disease protocols.

www.webmd.com...


Done...end of thread.

Everything else is simply doom porn.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:57 PM
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a reply to: kruphix

You must be so fun at parties.

Or did you just want to practice using that new phrase you just learned?

Des and I have both engaged you in a positive manner. Yet you come back with the same crap you started with without addressing a single thing either of us really said.

I'm voting you off the island.
edit on 8/4/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




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