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Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

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posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: 00nunya00
You're way ahead of me.



Well, you've been reading and updating all day, and I got a few hours break to see my lawyer and take my son for an autism appt, so I'm just a little fresher at this hour.
Threads like these are why I always come to ATS first when something big happens; the crowdsourced research is unlike any other site, anywhere. We all actually WANT to share our findings, instead of holding them back until we can copyright and sell our theories. ATS is the future of news media, IMHO.




posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: Destinyone

Or they kept staff to a minimum.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: Zebra501

I live 4 miles from Dobbins and sat there (and at the Marietta diner) for a few hours. Missed it by a minute it seems because when I got home it was landing.

Why do you think they used a Grady ambulance...with as bloody as Grady is. Doesn't Emory, a BSL-4 facility, have a BSL-4 ambulance?


Oh...maybe because it wasn't Brantly in it??? Just a paranoid guess on my part.

Des



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:00 PM
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originally posted by: adnanmuf

originally posted by: 00nunya00

originally posted by: adnanmuf
Well if he is Maine that's good news considering the American reston can't live in animal and plant Flora because it's cold. Remember Ebola is Tropical!! In origin.
Mind you all germwarfare agents are Tropical diseases agent. They shouldn't call it biowarfare they should call it tropical disease. Easier to phathom.


Ebola doesn't live in plants at all, and last I looked, mammals are warm-blooded, even in the winter time. And there's no reason to think they would have kept him in Maine. That was the shell-game switch place, not the final destination.
I know for sure it's in the Flora. Add the dirt to that.


Dude, cite this $#!t or stop posting. EBOLA IS NOT IN OR ON PLANTS UNLESS A SYMPTOMATIC VICTIM HAS SNEEZED OR BLED ON IT. Seriously, back up your claims or please quit cluttering the thread with nonsense.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

Someone else at least thought of this and looked into it: Are Plants Ebola's Natural Reservoir?

Experimental Inoculation of Plants and Animals with Ebola Virus
edit on 8/4/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:05 PM
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I'll be at work during tomorrow's arrival...closer to Emory than Dobbins
But I'll check in at lunch! Have a good night, all.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:05 PM
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If you look in the dirt you find 1000 different types of viruses. Viruses can live dormant. Especially the tropical kind.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:07 PM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

Thanks for your time and dedication Lucid. Sweet Dreams.

Des



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:09 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: 00nunya00

Someone else at least thought of this and looked into it: Are Plants Ebola's Natural Reservoir?


A couple of easy answers to their questions:
1) Flowering cycles feed both insects and fruit bats, as well as non-fruit-bats. Bats are known reservoirs of Marburg, which is very similar to ebola. Bats are kept as pets in Africa and also eaten. The more there are, the likelier it is to eat an infected one.

2) Bats bite. They bite humans and animals, usually by mistake. The bite transmits the virus easily.

3)Insects that bite multiple hosts is a much more likely method of transfer, because they actually suck the blood of their hosts and sometimes regurgitate it into another host.

That page is just an undergrad report project. Nothing more. And just because the question was asked, it's obvious from the page the answer has never been "yes" or even "probably".

ETA: in the second link, concerning the plants:

Thirteen plants either wilted or developed lesions on the leaves ascribed to mechanical injury during the inoculation process, but no infectivity could be recovered from the tissues, and no evidence of virus infection was observed by electron microscopy.


edit on 4-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:10 PM
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For every pathogen it have a specific reservoir a specific host and the occasional randevo. They only visit humans but they their own homes year round.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:15 PM
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originally posted by: adnanmuf
If you look in the dirt you find 1000 different types of viruses. Viruses can live dormant. Especially the tropical kind.


Please cite your source that allows you to say "I KNOW it's in plants and dirt." If you know it, you must have a body of research you're drawing from. You can even take a pic of the page of the book you're getting it from, if you have one. Just something other than your word.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:16 PM
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viruses are not alive or LIVE like humans etc. They alter their host alter the code of its make up etc. The debate still remains if viruses are even alive....

Gotta think like a virus to try and understand one...



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:17 PM
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originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: NoAngel2u

That was a question I had too. As in why did they not offer to test on Africans if they had it? Hell who knows maybe they have been, and maybe without all the legality squared away or maybe the legality is a stumbling block. Could be a lot of reasons.


I actually addressed this in one of the other threads. Ethically, do you use an untested (on humans anyway) serum that may not work and potentially be deadly (graft vs host disease) on a person without understanding or a volunteer with the medical knowledge to give fully informed consent on something that may kill him?


With all due respect, that does not square with the fact that there were other medical professionals of other nationalities that would have just as much of an understanding as the good Dr Brantly, and became ill before he did.
edit on 8/4/1414 by NoAngel2u because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:23 PM
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Just saw this on CNN.

3 hospitals in new york... wonder if these doctors know about the false negatives?

www.nytimes.com...

"At NYU Langone Medical Center last week, a patient who went to the emergency room with a fever and who mentioned a recent visit to West Africa was given a mask and moved to a secluded area, said Dr. Michael Phillips, the hospital’s director of Infection Prevention and Control. But further questioning revealed that the patient had not visited any of the affected countries, “so we stopped right there,” Dr. Phillips said."


edit on 4-8-2014 by JG1993 because: forgot that gem



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:24 PM
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Lucidity:
It was just dumb luck on my part...I thought I had more time and had intended on being around Dobbins so I went for a walk first. Luckily I always look up when planes go by!

According to Grady, they are in the process of covering the surfaces of the ambulance with sheets (forget the exact name they used) for tomorrow. Once they're done transporting her, they will decontaminate and put it back into general usage.

One other interesting tidbit mentioned, they duct taped all seals of their hazmat suits. Which I guess I would expect but if Ebola truly isn't that easy to catch like they're trying to tell us, you'd think that would be overkill.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:29 PM
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originally posted by: JG1993
Just saw this on CNN.

3 hospitals in new york... wonder if these doctors know about the false negatives?

www.nytimes.com...

"At NYU Langone Medical Center last week, a patient who went to the emergency room with a fever and who mentioned a recent visit to West Africa was given a mask and moved to a secluded area, said Dr. Michael Phillips, the hospital’s director of Infection Prevention and Control. But further questioning revealed that the patient had not visited any of the affected countries, “so we stopped right there,” Dr. Phillips said."



Anecdote about docs keeping up with research: when I wasn't able to get pregnant in a normal period of time, I researched why it might be. Came across a PCOS support forum with lots of well-researched normal people like ATS. Found out PCOS can occur in anyone, even skinny feminine-looking women, where the classical theory was that it's only found in women who are heavy and show abnormal facial and body hair growth (because of its effects on the endocrine system). I went to one of the best-rated OBGYNs in town, asked her for an insulin resistance test and maybe an ultrasound of my ovaries to rule out PCOS. She says to me "but you're not fat and hairy, you can't have PCOS." When I told her about my research, she promptly said "sigh, okay, here's a referral to a fertility specialist. Have a nice day."

Lo and behold, a few blood tests and an ultrasound later, I had confirmed PCOS. Go figure.
edit on 4-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: JG1993
Just saw this on CNN.

3 hospitals in new york... wonder if these doctors know about the false negatives?

www.nytimes.com...

"At NYU Langone Medical Center last week, a patient who went to the emergency room with a fever and who mentioned a recent visit to West Africa was given a mask and moved to a secluded area, said Dr. Michael Phillips, the hospital’s director of Infection Prevention and Control. But further questioning revealed that the patient had not visited any of the affected countries, “so we stopped right there,” Dr. Phillips said."



Thanks for the link and story. I found one part of the story very interesting. This part...


Following the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every patient entering one of the city’s hospitals who has fever, headache and other symptoms associated with Ebola (as well as countless other ailments), is asked two new questions.

“Have you traveled to or from West African countries in the last 10 days? Have you been in contact with an Ebola patient or with anyone who has been in contact with an Ebola patient?”

When someone is suspected of having the infection, there are three key things that doctors rely on to make the diagnosis, Dr. Wilson said.

First, the history of travel and contacts is critical. Second is whether the symptoms match those of Ebola.

Finally, there are blood tests. There are only two facilities in the country, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, that can perform these kinds of blood tests.

The blood tests are exceedingly complicated, he said, and there are different tests depending on the degree of sickness of the patient. Generally, he said, a 100 percent confirmation can take several days.www.nytimes.com...


That's all fine and dandy. BUT, it's all contingent on the person being questioned...being honest. I have trust issues when it comes to complete strangers, and life and death situations. It's becoming clear to me, there is no set protocol for dealing with the possibility of ebola walking into any hospital in our Country, except for a few with in house safe facilities and staff for them.

This is a learn as you go process for thousands of hospitals...that scares the crap out of me.

Des


edit on 4-8-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: JG1993


originally posted by: JG1993
But further questioning revealed that the patient had not visited any of the affected countries, “so we stopped right there,” Dr. Phillips said."



I bet the Nigerians regret making this very mistake after Sawyer.

a reply to: Destinyone

Yup.
edit on 4-8-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:38 PM
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originally posted by: loam

originally posted by: JG1993
But further questioning revealed that the patient had not visited any of the affected countries, “so we stopped right there,” Dr. Phillips said."



I bet the Nigerians regret making this very mistake after Sawyer.

a reply to: Destinyone

Yup.


Exactly. But at least this patient didn't take a leak on everyone, lol.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 10:47 PM
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originally posted by: 00nunya00

originally posted by: adnanmuf
If you look in the dirt you find 1000 different types of viruses. Viruses can live dormant. Especially the tropical kind.


Please cite your source that allows you to say "I KNOW it's in plants and dirt." If you know it, you must have a body of research you're drawing from. You can even take a pic of the page of the book you're getting it from, if you have one. Just something other than your word.


I know it because I read it!
the reston virus .
I cant remember where i read it.you google.
youd better not bother me again,
and stop talking abouit grady and bull Cd4 and crap.
nothing can stop the Flue.
The ebola is much infectious than the flue by a hundred times.
so please end the spell of grady on this thread.



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