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I am an Ukranian, and this video must be spread around the world. (video)

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posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 02:57 AM
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reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 


|That guy on frame 47 has reptilian eyes.




posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 03:01 AM
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Seriously, she's hot..so I liostened...it really does work



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 03:35 AM
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TritonTaranis

paddz420
reply to post by amfirst1
 


"Yea it piss me off when they call them neo nazi and ish. It's anarchists. Anarchists are people who hate their form of government, so they have to tear it down to recreate a better one."

What?? I'm an Anarchist. I don't hate my "form of Government" I hate Government. If it was Anarchists in Ukraine, they would not tear down the Government to recreate a better one, they would tear down the Government and never allow another Government to form.
So until they reject the USA, EU, Russia or a Ukrainian Government I would have to disagree that it's anarchists.

As Vendetta Kingz song goes "War never changes, Government is dangerous" That's all forms of Government, Leadership, Hierarchy.

edit on 18-3-2014 by paddz420 because: (no reason given)



So you're saying you'd rather the world have no government and no rules

That would be kaos and a far more dangerous world

I suggest the next time you're unhappy protest for change it does work

The world is still developing but going forward and progressing never the less, but im recent days it's 1938 all over again



Why are you attacking him for his political belief, but ignoring the very purpose of his post?

He posted the truth. So far I have yet to see anything about significant anarchist activity in the Ukraine. The coup was conducted by external actors and the players were the most radical minority that they could recruit: ultra-nationalist Ukrainians, with jingoist views of Russians and Jews. These people idolize WWII-era Nazi-sympathizers and have torn down Soviet monuments only to put up pan-European-style fascist symbols. They forced their way into national parliament, scared away any pro-Russian politicians and state-officials, and then the remaining parliamentarians "democratically" elected leaders from the fascist faction by voting for them on consoles belonging to the parliamentarians that ran off (photo evidence exists for this). Next, the president of Ukraine is somehow replaced by a self-imposed nobody, and recognized as a world leader of a legitimate revolution by the western world.

Then the new government started sacking state officials. They sacked the old navy chief because he was too-Russian, and his replacement defected in a matter of days. Why would a top military official defect so quickly? They also sacked the most important security force Ukraine had, Berkut, because Berkut just spent weeks pushing back the fascists.

Fascist gangs continue to roam around Ukraine, lynching and shooting people on the streets where there are anti-coup demonstrations. These gangs are now sent for training by the coup forces to become the national guard.

Meanwhile, the West cries about an imaginary Russian invasion that never happened. Crimea declared autonomy, held their own government elections, and then formed self-defence militias to keep out the fascists. In this process, dispossessed Ukrainians who were the target of fascists flocked the Crimea for protection. Crimea requested military assistance from Russia to help stabilize the crisis. Crimean forces captured airfields to ensure that pro-coup forces would not use them to deploy into Crimea before the Russians. Then the Russians sent in some spetsnaz groups to capture key Ukrainian assets (such as S-300 installations). There was no formal Russian invasion as Russia already had 16,000+ soldiers in Crimea as part of their Black Sea Fleet, and quite frankly they did not need to invade when the Crimean self-defence forces, composed of pro-Russian Ukrainians, were clearly efficient and well-liked by the local population.

As for Crimea proper, it was already Russian, culturally-speaking. Russia has an obligation to protect these people against genocide, just like they did in South Ossetia and Abkhazia when the Georgian government ordered its military to commit crimes against humanity by conducting collective punishment and wanton destruction that killed thousands of ethnic Russians. Russia invoked Responsibility to Protect while the West bemoaned Russian actions, essentially endorsing the genocide in the process.

The leader of "Right Sector", the primary fascist faction, has been outed as being an insurgent from Chechnya. There is clear video of him, from either the 1990s or early 2000s, interviewing this man as he describes how many Russian soldiers he has killed and how he cannot wait for the attacks to begin on Moscow. This man is identified as an international terrorist. Now, he has called on Chechens to commit terrorism against Russia. In response to the Crimean referendum, he has stated that Russian pipelines in Ukraine will be bombed. He claims that Ukraine's destiny is to control Russian territory all the way through the Caucasus and to the Caspian.

Meanwhile, people in the West cry about Russian invasion and weep at pretty little girls in high-production value PR videos like the one featured in this thread. I heard some blogger claimed that the Crimean referendum results did not add up, so I guess we should all flock around that weak PR as well.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 03:38 AM
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reply to post by Vovin
 



Yep, good sinthesys of the situation. Sadly the drama queens need awe so they keep posting images of putin and hitler, and trying to connect them, already told them that is more harm than good but meh, you cant heal stupid as they say.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 03:50 AM
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Palestinian engineer vanished from Ukrainian
United Nations agency confirms.
The U.N. agency believes he was abducted and
illegally transported by Israeli security forces,
Israeli secret service Mossad carried out the abduction
in order to sabotage a key electric power plant
in Gaza Strip where he worked as a senior manager.
www.kyivpost.com...

^ who is orchestrating the events in Ukraine ? ^
btw Ukrainian independence/nationalism is hated by zionists,
and marxists ever since Ukraine has become independent.

It's all theater/ dog and pony show

hamodia.com...

www.the-american-interest.com...

jewbellish.com...

www.bloomberg.com...
The world theater/colonization is run by the marxits elites

Israeli soldier who led a Kiev fighting unit ! ! :
www.haaretz.com...



edit on 18/3/14 by ToneDeaf because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 04:31 AM
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TritonTaranis
Russians we're aloud to vote in previous elections

Not Russia speaking Ukrainians but Actual Russian Russia's

Becomes more of a joke the more the facts come out

www.ctvnews.ca...

edit on 17-3-2014 by TritonTaranis because: (no reason given)


You should watch that again. First of all he is talking about that happening in Ukrainian elections, not on Crimea. It was still wrong, and yes it is known that the Ukranian President was a patsy of Putin, he even ran to Russia after being deposed, which is part of the reason that Russians who were not citizens of Ukraine were allowed to vote...

In Crimea, the laws make it illegal for people with other nationalities to vote. They have to be Crimean citizens to be able to vote.

The Russian journalist even explains this in the video I posted.


edit on 18-3-2014 by ElectricUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 04:45 AM
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edit on 18-3-2014 by paddz420 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 04:54 AM
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pheonix358
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 


Welcome to Western style Democracy where everyone gets a vote, citizens, military, illegal aliens, dogs, cats, just everyone. The US trend for allowing the dead to vote did not catch on in Crimea.

P


WRONG, Crimea was a sovereign nation. It has it's own Constitution, and it's own laws... Let's see how long it lasts, and what changes the pro-Russian government in Crimea will make to their Constitution, which I am certain they will do so.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 05:12 AM
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reply to post by Vovin
 


Wow...talk about real propaganda... You got your facts wrong buddy... All you did was make claims without presenting one iota of corroborating evidence, but there is evidence, some of which I have shown that the Russians used intimidation, first in the call for the referendum, then to use intimidation and threats among other tactics against minorities. The minorities themselves have stated that they fear the occupation of Russia in Crimea. Heck, there have been ethnic RUSSIANS who have also fled from Crimea because they did not want to live under a Russian oppressive power again. All you have done is twist the truth and even lie about the situation there.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 06:04 AM
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I couldn't resist, I had to come back and comment on this thread when I read some of the utter nonsense.

The automatic anti-Americanism is seemingly warping brains and destroying common sense. There's a notion (especially amongst conspiracy theorists) that because Snowden did good and went to Russia, or because America has been a hypocrite when it comes to foreign policy, or because the US has used influence in other countries (just as China does, the UK does, and just as Russia does too) that they should automatically ignore one simple fact...

Russia has invaded another country.

Forget the accusations of influencing through NGO's (which is really no different to any other group pushing for social change), forget Snowden, forget the fact that fascists were involved in the protests (and yet there has been no evidence of any minority group being attacked in Kiev), forget the fact that the democratically elected Kiev government fired their corrupt and violent leader, none of this changes the simple fact that Russia has invaded another country with military force, stolen a chunk of land under an illegal "referendum" at the end of a gun, and breached international law.

You cannot claim to support the rights and freedoms of people while expressing support for an illegal invasion and occupation of another country.

Putin had plenty of other avenues to go down to stabilize things. He wasn't losing his base in Crimea, he wasn't going to lose ties with Ukraine, he wasn't going to experience any real issues by sitting down with the Ukrainian government after the planned elections to further their partnership. Instead, he ignored all the legal and internationally accepted norms and took the opportunity to invade and annex part of Ukraine. He clearly used this as an excuse to steal back a part of another country he believes is rightfully Russian, regardless of international laws and regardless of the people of Ukraine and Crimea.

People can call the video propaganda all they like, it won't change the fact that Russia has invaded another country.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 06:07 AM
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Rocker2013
I couldn't resist, I had to come back and comment on this thread when I read some of the utter nonsense.


You cannot claim to support the rights and freedoms of people while expressing support for an illegal invasion and occupation of another country.


You mean like afghan? Iraq? Vietnam? Gitmo? Its not antiamericanism, its called common sense.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 06:32 AM
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I also want to point out a few things that the people of Crimea and the supporters of this invasion haven't really considered...

1. Crimea relies heavily on tourism, which has now ended. Within days of the invasion businesses were closing across the entire peninsula, with hotels, restaurants and bars all shutting down and fearful about their future. Most of these will not be opening again, because the increasing international tourism they had been experiencing since 2010 has completely dried up. The majority of tourism to the peninsula was from Ukraine, then a smaller % from Latvia, Belarus and Russia. Russia is now promoting Sochi as the single most vital tourist destination in Russia and their tourism would have diverted there without this invasion. All the other countries of the region have expressed support for Ukraine and are working on further distancing themselves from Russia. Ukrainians will no longer be holidaying in Crimea either. Cruise ships had started docking in Crimea, and they have now stopped and will probably not be returning. The young people employed in these businesses will have little option but to move along the coast to Ukraine for work, further reducing the income of Crimea.

2. Crimea needs an estimated $30bil a year in financial support. Putin is not going to be paying that. People who think he has any interest in financially supporting the people of Crimea as their economy collapses are naive at best. He wants his base, the other Ukrainian bases on Crimea, and the staging platform for further incursion. He doesn't give a rats behind about the economic security of the people living there and we all know this to be true. He doesn't give a damn about the many regions of his own country wallowing in poverty, so why would he care about the people of Crimea?

3. The younger generations are seemingly absent from most of the protests and news reports, why is that? In every other revolution movement the youth have been at the forefront, in Egypt, in Libya, in Kiev, they were on the front lines saying what they wanted. Yet in Crimea and other pro-Russian protests they seem to be 90% over the age of 40. The only news report on this issue I have seen where younger people were represented proportionally or more so (outside of the protests in Kiev) was a video from an E Ukrainian city, where they packed a theater to the rafters to debate the future of Ukraine. It was standing capacity only, and 90% of them were in their teens and 20's, all expressing their desire for an independent Ukraine with closer ties to Europe. This tells me that there is a clear age divide in the wishes of the people, and it means that all the younger people in Crimea will likely be fleeing for Ukraine.

4. Crimea will not be recognized and will not have a voice in the international community. As Russia is also now facing increasing exclusion from international affairs this will only impact the economic troubles the people there will be facing. Imports to the peninsula will have to rely on Russia, and imports to Russia will likely be hit too. Before sanctions were even announced business leaders in Russia were warning of an economic crisis they could clearly see developing.

All we need is a little common sense here. All the evidence suggests to me that the Crimean people , if they genuinely did vote to become part of Russia, have made a terrible mistake. Complete independence with ties to Ukraine after a recognized and internationally agree referendum would have better secured the economic stability of the peninsula. Continued ties to Kiev and the rest of Ukraine would have almost guaranteed them a better quality of life. Joining the Russian Federation instead has done nothing but increase the uncertainty and economic instability of the peninsula.

They have nothing to export, they have increasingly relied on tourism for income, their standing in the region has been all but destroyed. They have made a very bad decision here. If there's anyone other than elderly people and soldiers in Crimea in 20 years, expect to see another internal crisis when the people there rise up against their dictatorial pro-Russian puppet leadership. Their "dream" of becoming a part of Russia is going to become a nightmare, and they'll have no one to blame but themselves.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 06:35 AM
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reply to post by Yusomad
 


As I pointed out, several countries have been hypocrites, and I fully accept that it's pretty laughable to see the US standing on a soapbox about invasion when they (and the UK) have done it several times.

However (and this is the bit knee-jerk anti-American's absolutely hate being pointed out) RUSSIA HAS INVADED ANOTHER COUNTRY.

I saw a good analogy a few days ago... supporting Russia in this is like claiming it's okay for you to steal a car because someone else stole your friends bike ten years ago.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 07:27 AM
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greencmp
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 


I guess I shouldn't be surprised, the USSR got the most positive press when it was at its worst. I do not know why but, it seems that the more overt the totalitarianism, the more public sympathy is bestowed upon it, completely counterintuitive.

I believe that the Ukrainian people want freedom and liberty (in the American sense) and I am baffled by those who don't.
edit on 16-3-2014 by greencmp because: (no reason given)


You have to realize that there were a lot of fellow travelers in the west who were Marxist sympathizers and thus they supported the Soviets and Stalin. Putin, a former KGB officer, is the remnant of this and there are many fellow travelers in the west. Someone above posted "follow the money." That is correct. There is a lot of money in Russia and a lot of money to be made by Putin and his western allies if Ukrainian independence fails.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


because it was probably made by university students or something, these skills are like the basics that are taught in media courses.

I mean I see this sort of stuff in adds that are probably from a local add agency.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 


The evidence is easily found in the public domain.

As for "Russian invasion" I would like to see some real evidence of that. Crimea obtained its own independence in reaction to the radicals that took over Kiev, and then they requested assistance from Russia. All of it was legal under international law, which Putin strongly believes in following merely because western powers do not ( legitimacy).

Crimea asked Russia for two reasons: most of Crimea is already ethnic Russian and identify themselves as Russian- and Russia already had soldiers deployed in Crimea as per a legal lease that is good for the next few decades. The Russians wanted to secure Crimea for security, and the Crimean nation requested help from the Russians for security. It was symbiotic decision-making.

As for people leaving Crimea out of fear of the Russians? I wouldn't doubt it. I'm sure there were a lot of people there afraid that Crimea would blow up into the epicentre of a wide-ranging military conflict, and I'm also sure that there were many pro-coup citizens there as well. But there were a lot of Ukrainians who flocked to Crimea in fear of the fascists too. This is merely the reality of the situation: it is not black and white and there are no absolutes.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by ElectricUniverse
[more)

Even if the Russian Soldiers did vote, it wouldn't have affected much more than 3% of the total vote. All elections have fraud. The Crimean people have clearly spoken, get over it already.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 07:11 PM
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Rocker2013
I also want to point out a few things that the people of Crimea and the supporters of this invasion haven't really considered...

1. Crimea relies heavily on tourism, which has now ended. Within days of the invasion businesses were closing across the entire peninsula, with hotels, restaurants and bars all shutting down and fearful about their future. Most of these will not be opening again, because the increasing international tourism they had been experiencing since 2010 has completely dried up. The majority of tourism to the peninsula was from Ukraine, then a smaller % from Latvia, Belarus and Russia. Russia is now promoting Sochi as the single most vital tourist destination in Russia and their tourism would have diverted there without this invasion. All the other countries of the region have expressed support for Ukraine and are working on further distancing themselves from Russia. Ukrainians will no longer be holidaying in Crimea either. Cruise ships had started docking in Crimea, and they have now stopped and will probably not be returning. The young people employed in these businesses will have little option but to move along the coast to Ukraine for work, further reducing the income of Crimea.

2. Crimea needs an estimated $30bil a year in financial support. Putin is not going to be paying that. People who think he has any interest in financially supporting the people of Crimea as their economy collapses are naive at best. He wants his base, the other Ukrainian bases on Crimea, and the staging platform for further incursion. He doesn't give a rats behind about the economic security of the people living there and we all know this to be true. He doesn't give a damn about the many regions of his own country wallowing in poverty, so why would he care about the people of Crimea?

3. The younger generations are seemingly absent from most of the protests and news reports, why is that? In every other revolution movement the youth have been at the forefront, in Egypt, in Libya, in Kiev, they were on the front lines saying what they wanted. Yet in Crimea and other pro-Russian protests they seem to be 90% over the age of 40. The only news report on this issue I have seen where younger people were represented proportionally or more so (outside of the protests in Kiev) was a video from an E Ukrainian city, where they packed a theater to the rafters to debate the future of Ukraine. It was standing capacity only, and 90% of them were in their teens and 20's, all expressing their desire for an independent Ukraine with closer ties to Europe. This tells me that there is a clear age divide in the wishes of the people, and it means that all the younger people in Crimea will likely be fleeing for Ukraine.

4. Crimea will not be recognized and will not have a voice in the international community. As Russia is also now facing increasing exclusion from international affairs this will only impact the economic troubles the people there will be facing. Imports to the peninsula will have to rely on Russia, and imports to Russia will likely be hit too. Before sanctions were even announced business leaders in Russia were warning of an economic crisis they could clearly see developing.

All we need is a little common sense here. All the evidence suggests to me that the Crimean people , if they genuinely did vote to become part of Russia, have made a terrible mistake. Complete independence with ties to Ukraine after a recognized and internationally agree referendum would have better secured the economic stability of the peninsula. Continued ties to Kiev and the rest of Ukraine would have almost guaranteed them a better quality of life. Joining the Russian Federation instead has done nothing but increase the uncertainty and economic instability of the peninsula.

They have nothing to export, they have increasingly relied on tourism for income, their standing in the region has been all but destroyed. They have made a very bad decision here. If there's anyone other than elderly people and soldiers in Crimea in 20 years, expect to see another internal crisis when the people there rise up against their dictatorial pro-Russian puppet leadership. Their "dream" of becoming a part of Russia is going to become a nightmare, and they'll have no one to blame but themselves. [/quote]

Well it is clear that you have an opinion on the matter, it's just too bad that much of it is incorrect.

First of all. The Ukraine has not had a working economy for a long time. Russia on the other hand is doing very well. They are the largest energy producer in the world. People seem to have this picture of Russia being some poor, almost third world nation. They are in fact, one of the fastest growing economies in the world.

As for your notion of people fleeing Crimea for the Ukraine. That doesn't make much sense either. Why would any Crimean leave a secure, stable region, to go live in a country with no job prospects, very little security and be amongst people who are hostile towards you? there is no logic to that what so ever.
edit on 18-3-2014 by Darkmask because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-3-2014 by Darkmask because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by Darkmask
 


I know, it's insane. A coup takes place, forcing out a democratically-elected president and some parliamentarians, and people clammer about a revolution. But when a region reacts against the coup and perform elections and referendums, it's an "invasion". The thought process behind this is dangerously absurd.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 09:19 PM
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reply to post by sosobad
 


Yeah now that's some propaganda right there! Straight from Russian FSB. Ukraine has been pushed around by Putin for many years and the entire world knows this but you.

Putin and Russia have ZERO right to annex Crimea. Absolutely not one percent!

If the people of Crimea really wanted this then they would have petitioned the UN along time ago. The Vote to join Russia only after Russian troops invade and beat people who speak out against them is a complete scam!

Russia is the only one breaking laws and treaty's here. Putin pulled the same crap with Georgia under the cover of the Olympics in China and if it were not for the Olympics being in Russia this time he would have did it again but he had to wait or everyone would have left and made him look like more of an ass.

Russia deserves the pain from the insurgency they are about to get and Putin will be very foolish to send anymore troops into mainland Ukraine because NATO is just waiting for him and his decrepit army to make anymore mistakes.



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