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Dangerous Gas may be cause of super-charged weather, mass die-offs, quakes and more

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posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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What an awesome storm that can pick up all this ice off a lake and throw it on the shore? This freak storm hit Toronto




A freak weather system slammed into the GTA overnight. The rare “thundersnow” system brought heavy wind, rain, snow and the occasional flash of lightning. Gusts of 90 km/h toppled trees and traffic lights and a wind warning issued by Environment Canada remained in effect for much of southern Ontario Sunday morning. Fallen trees and hydro wires shut down Rosedale Valley Rd between Bayview Ave. and Park Rd. overnight. Toronto Hydro reported multiple pockets of power outages across the city, the largest being east of Yonge St. and south of Danforth Ave. Toronto Hydro spokesperson Thelma Hatzis said about 10,000 customers lost power overnight. Hatzsis said power should be restored across Toronto by the afternoon. A number of house fires are being pinned on the storm. In Vaughan, the attic of a home near Islington Ave. and Major Mackenzie Dr. caught fire after it was struck by lightning. The residents were at home sleeping when it hit, police said, but managed to escape unscathed. While parts of downtown Toronto got pounded by rain, suburban communities experienced heavy snowfall and, in the case of Brampton, golf-ball sized hail. According to Environment Canada winds in Toronto remained around 55 km/h with gusts of up to 70 km/h, as of 9 a.m. Sunday. Flurries are expected later in the day, the weather agency said.


Freak Storm hits Toronto




posted on Jan, 24 2013 @ 11:24 PM
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Sinkhole Update:

Grand Rapids, MI


A boil-water advisory will remain in effect at least into Saturday for homes near a sinkhole caused by a water main break at Adams Street and Gladstone Drive SE. Crews early Thursday, Jan. 24, reconnected 85 homes to water and were repairing the intersection where a break in a 30-inch pipe the previous day siphoned dirt down an incline on Gladstone and left a large sinkhole. The photos at right show some of today’s cleanup.


Source

DeLand, FL


Officials are investigating a "good-sized" sinkhole in DeLand that has swallowed a large tree and a portion of a fence. The Volusia County Sheriff's Office said the sinkhole opened near Mill Road and State Road 17. Officials estimated the hole to be 32 feet and 30 feet deep. Local 6 News helicopter Sky 6 flew over the hole, which is located in a rural area of DeLand. A home is located about 50 yards from the sinkhole.


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Salisbury, NC


An 18-inch deep sink hole in the middle of the 1200 block of West Bank Street may not have, “swallowed a car,” as heard on emergency scanner traffic, but it did require a city crew to patch it. The sinkhole, which measured 2 feet by 3 feet, was in the middle of the road in front of a 1217 West Bank Street home. Just after 4:15 p.m., a Salisbury Police officer was flagged by a motorist and parked his patrol vehicle in the middle of the road. The officer alerted motorists to move over slightly to either side of the road, around the hole.


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Oxford, AL


A sinkhole is not expected to delay the opening of the new Publix store in Oxford. The sinkhole appeared this week on the grounds of a retail development called "Oxford Commons," located on Leon Smith Parkway at I-20. The site was once part of the old antebellum "Davis Farm" and archaeologists say it was a Native American village before that.


Source

Springfield, TN


A detention basin at Springfield’s water treatment plant has partially collapsed, dumping sludge held within the basin into the Red River. The collapse was caused by a sinkhole at the base of the detention basin. Springfield’s Water/Wastewater Director Roger Lemasters said the 150-foot square basin emptied on or around Jan. 5 when a worker noticed the water from that basin was gone. “It’s causing some big issues,” Lemasters said. “We have the two basins, but can only use one now.” Meg Lockhart, a spokesperson with Tennessee’s Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), said in an email on Thursday, Jan. 17, that the wastewater is not raw sewage.


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Utah


A sink-hole was found in the Holladay area Saturday. The giant hole is 10 feet deep and about 20 feet wide. It's located at 4525 South Wasatch Boulevard. Police say they're not sure what caused it, but rushing water was heard beneath the surface. It could take days for crews to repair the hole.


Source

Charlotte, NC


Charlotte-Mecklenburg Utilities crews have repaired a 12-inch broken water pipe under Tyvola Centre Drive that had shut off water to nearby apartments all day Monday.


Source

Smithtown, NY


A giant sinkhole that swallowed up an SUV has closed a portion of roadway in Smithtown early Tuesday morning. According to police, a 911 call was received indicating that an SUV had driven into the sinkhole. Police said the Suffolk County Water Authority is working on the problem. Mount Pleasant Road remians closed in both directions between Cambridge Road and Daisy Lane in Smithtown. Police said there were no reported injuries. The incident occurred at 3:39 a.m. on Tuesday.


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Worth County, GA


Worth County Public Works crews are barricading a hole that has formed under part of Jewell Crowe Road in Western Worth County. Only part of the road is affected, and they hope to fill it in tomorrow. For the time being however, you should avoid the area if possible.


Source

Giants sinkhole swallows car in Brazil



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 01:06 AM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


Wow, Sinkhole City! I looked around Google Maps and there are bodies of water near every one of those areas, except they didn't specify the exact area in Brazil for that one, so I couldn't look there. Biogenic sulfide corrosion eating away pipes and other infrastructure seems possible. Even if those bodies of water aren't directly emitting hydrogen sulfide themselves (yet), that'd be where any blowing by from the oceans or wherever would tend to accumulate, and then at least some would dissolve into the water, and then anything steel or copper or concrete near the water table (e.g. underground stuff) would start corroding and disintegrating. Whatever's causing these sinkholes, the problem is obviously getting widespread now!

Here's a story about a 'foul smell' blanketing Bridgeton (MO) now, coming from a landfill:

Foul smell in Bridgeton, Missouri
Bridgeton landfill emitting odor is near nuclear waste site

Quote: "Previous stenches have been caused by methane fires, deep inside a landfill located in Bridgeton. And next to the regular-trash landfill is one with illegally-dumped radioactive waste from the Manhattan Project."

I wonder if they're drilling wells there now BECAUSE that landfill is now emitting methane and/or hydrogen sulfide, so they can try to burn it off, or react it away, before it becomes a heavy emitter of either gas and starts seriously poisoning people there, or just plain explodes. And yuck, nuclear waste from the freakin' Manhattan Project right next door?! Yikes, and I bet most of the people downwind of that area - St. Louis (Missouri) and East St. Louis (Illinois) and surrounding areas - don't even have a clue about the potential danger.
edit on 25-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 02:16 AM
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Rezlooper, I have been reading all of your posts/threads of late relevant to the sinkholes and the dangerous gas theory. What a tremendous amount of work and thought and research you have presented. A great effort put forward and wanna say thanx. What you have presented sounds/feels right.

The last few days here in NW Louisiana there has been the most god-awful smell. It is concerning to me because of all the fracking here in the area but also because some folks here have been noticing "bubbling" in their swampy/woodsey yards as well. Too many oddities occurring here of late.

The recent ice/sleet/rain wintery mix we had in this area had me take notice of something else. 2 of our local news websites had articles like alerts/warnings in regard to the weather mess. It was mentioned that residents should cover up with boots/raincoats, etc. but to actually try and avoid being out in that weather altogether. Also, to shower immediately and wash all your clothes if caught in the wintery mix...for kids not to ingest the flurries and so on. To try and not come in contact with the mess while wiping off cars and such...never saw articles like that before because of wintery mix.? The fact that radioactive material has been reported to have been dumped into some of these salt domes makes me wonder too....though, you can't wash that out so am confused about the entire dealy

The bad odors here lately gives one pause. I agree with your dangerous gas theory. There are so many refineries and gas/oil wells around here and they use so many chemicals in the process of fracking, it is hard to know what smells are what anymore. I am worried that Louisiana may be in big trouble because of many of the reasons you have brought up...as well as many other parts of the world. The odors are sickening and make folks feel terrible but its not from the flu...I think it is what is in the air. Thanx again for your hard work!!



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 02:49 AM
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I usually check the usgs site before I turn in. There was a 4.1 earthquake in Eastern Texas tonite. Texas has a lot of problems too, same as Louisiana. More quakes this past 12 months and lots of fracking and weird weather, in Texas, so your theories can tie in for there, I would think. I"ve been having a feeling that Texas AND Louisiana are in for a lot of trouble. The gulf of Mexico oil spill and Bayou Corne and tremblors there and the Camp Minden troubles and more....to much "stuff" going on. I feel like your dangerous gas theory can really fit the bill relevant to these 2 areas and others as well. I think Louisiana is going to have a decent "shaker" soon as well.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 06:41 AM
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Kudos for your continued awesome work on this theory.

Just wanted to add a little tidbit. SE Michigan here, been stuck in the cold for almost twenty years now. At least five times in the last month we have had a very strong sulphuric odor that has lasted for about a half hour. Kids, neighbors, and ex wife have all smelled. Definitely not a gas leak, and in my 20 years here, have never smelled it.

Smelled it last night around 9 pm, as I was adding some windshield wiper fluid to the car getting ready for the small snow we are getting today.

Anywho, thought I would share. Keep up the good work man.

Peace



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 07:32 AM
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The sinkholes and sulfur dioxide connection is very worrying for me, I am about to email this page to the city water department. We have had a water line broken and leaking for over a month, a steady stream of water is coming from the neighbors yard and flowing down the road into a storm drain. I have called twice and pointed out water leaks can lead to sinkholes but all they have done is spray paint around the area marking the break, we are not even under a boil order. Funny thing is, the break is about 200 feet from a stormdrain that regularly smells like sulfur dioxide. I know that smell well because I interned at a wastewater plant in college. In the last 10 years we have had fish kills in all surrounding lakes, and for a while the beach at one lake was closed after people swimming started getting a mystery rash, that was around 4 years ago. Fracking here is on the increase, and with all the guys coming in from out of state it has made housing costs skyrocket making it hard for locals to afford housing. We have an injection well across the street from the walmart and it has caused cracks in the floor of the store. Some basic history of this area, we have lots of natural gas, and coal was our main industry until the 70s with high sulfur content coal being stripmined. Most of my family were miners until the mines started shutting down.

As foe the bees,I may also post this in the thread about bees, besides the risk of toxic gases, gmos, and herbicides, I have friends involved in studies pointing to the lack on native vegetation causing their demise as well. An area they worked to reclaimed with all native vegetation saw a 200% increase in pollinator species including bees in 5 years while surrounding areas were still losing them.

Just to add, jonnymnemonic if you have a chance I sent you a pm and would really appreciate a replay



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by shrevegal
 


Thanks for the post Shrevegal. There sure has been a lot of activity down there in LA and Texas. A 4.1 mag is pretty good size I would say for Texas, a little too big I'd say to be blamed on fracking.

Like Johnny pointed out in his hypothesis, a lot of the oceanic heating began right there in the Gulf. You've got anoxic waters, the BP spill, fracking and oil and gas throughout your region and the sinkhole occasionally burping. All these things are contributing to the rapid release of methane. There is a lot of activity as well all the way up to KY and TN, with tremors, booms, sky noise and the animal die-offs. There was also the hydrogen sulfide smells down south of New Orleans that happened not once but twice, first a month ago and then again last week. They blame these leaks on a chem plant in the area, but the chem plant still denies having anything to do with it, and I believe them.

And then there are your concerns for the area you live in. Bad smells, swamps are bubbling, and then your local news warning you about the snowflakes, not to ingest, take showers immediately. Man, that's creepy. I don't even know what to say about that one. Sure would like to see some pics of the swamps bubbling. If you or your neighbors could get pics you should post them. With all this going on I have to agree with you that something may be in store for the region, and unfortunately, I think LA is right smack in the middle of the highest risk area.
edit on 25-1-2013 by Rezlooper because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 05:04 PM
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Originally posted by lasertaglover
Kudos for your continued awesome work on this theory.

Just wanted to add a little tidbit. SE Michigan here, been stuck in the cold for almost twenty years now. At least five times in the last month we have had a very strong sulphuric odor that has lasted for about a half hour. Kids, neighbors, and ex wife have all smelled. Definitely not a gas leak, and in my 20 years here, have never smelled it.

Smelled it last night around 9 pm, as I was adding some windshield wiper fluid to the car getting ready for the small snow we are getting today.

Anywho, thought I would share. Keep up the good work man.

Peace


As I posted in reply to Shrevegal, there has been a lot of activity with quakes, the sinkhole, smells, booms and shakes, along the Gulf Coast in East Texas, LA, and MS. Then you have the rise in booms, shakes, sky noise and animal die-offs throughout Arkansas, KY and Tennessee. I might ad that Missouri also has had some activities along the MS River and with recent smells. If you look at the trends, most activity is in these regions but Indiana and Ohio have also had their share of mysterious booms, explosions and sink holes lately. So, it doesn't surprise me that next would be Michigan to start having bad smells and a Grand Rapids sinkhole this week. Also, PA has had some activity lately to. Not to discount that there has been reports of all kinds (sinkholes, die-offs, booms, quakes, smells) all over the place, especially as Johnny points it in his hypothesis, along the east and west coasts. It just seems that this zone moving north from those Gulf Coast states seems to have the most activity lately. I base that opinion after following all of the reports over the past couple of months. I don't have any graphs made up or anything like that, but i do collect and save all news reports and threads here at ATS and the zone I just mentioned is definitely the hot spot for most of the sinkholes, die-offs, small out of the ordinary quakes and tremors, mysterious booms and smells.

Well, this is ATS and everybody likes data and statistics, so maybe I should put together a graph following all these reports. But, that's time consuming and it takes quite a bit of time just to follow all these google alerts! Although, it would be nice to have statistics on die-offs, strange sky noises, sinkholes, smells, etc., but they'd still be inaccurate when based solely on news reports. I'm sure lot's of things go unreported.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


Well, I did not think about the booms and humming. I have not heard them myself, but just across the river here in Windsor, I heard they just got funding to investigate the humming, its that bad there. Ill try to find a link for you.

Sulfur smell here, humming not too far away.

Peace

Edit...ok, I feel like a moron... I had no idea that it is called the Windsor Hum, and that a google search has tons of links about it. I saw the funding bit on local WXYZ news, but here is another link for it...

www.livescience.com...
edit on 25-1-2013 by lasertaglover because: Added link



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 05:53 PM
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reply to post by lasertaglover
 


Thanks for the read They've got quite a mystery on their hands, huh. Strong enough to shake homes! That's a little bit more than a hum.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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As I was just saying about Kentucky...here's a home explosion, 4:10 am, two people critically injured. Home was heated off of natural gas, but authorities aren't sure what caused the ignition. I'm sure Johnny will have this one updated on his website. Fits with what he was recently saying about the early morning hours being the time to beware.


Two people were critically injured and a Northern Kentucky home was destroyed after an explosion at the residence Friday morning. Newport fire officials say an explosion caused a large fire at the home located in the 1600 block of Waterworks Road in Newport at about 4:10 a.m. Witnesses said the explosion sounded like a “war zone.” Officials say natural gas was fueling the fire, but the cause of the actual explosion is being investigated. Read more: www.kypost.com...


2 critically injured in home explosion in Newport


Officials say Ida Neal and her son Dwayne Luttrell sustained critical burns in the explosion and emergency crews transported them to University of Cincinnati Medical Center for treatment. Neal suffered burns to her face and hands will be released from the hospital in the next 2-3 days. Luttrell suffered third degree burns over 78 percent of his body and will have to remain hospitalized for the next 2-4 months for treatment. He is now on a breathing tube, officials say. Police say Neal and her son were responsive and talking when they left the scene. A third victim, Neal's husband Paul, sustained a compressed fracture in his back and cuts on his hand. Newport resident, Andy Crail said he heard the explosion from his neighboring house and ran outside to see what happened. “I sounded like a bomb went off, I didn’t know what to think,” Crail said. Read more: www.kypost.com...


And then there's this, "the house fell into a pit."


The house went up in flames after the explosion and one officer said the house "fell into a pit" when it exploded. The frigid temperatures have made fighting the fire more difficult. The water quickly turned into ice, creating slick conditions for the firefighters. "We're dealing with fighting the fire, which is dealing with fighting with the heat, and those type of problems, and going to the extreme opposite, dealing with the cold and frostbite," Krogman said. Read more: www.kypost.com...



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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Another thing that been occurring, strangely enough, on a regular basis is fireballs. It just seemed that spotting large fireballs streaking across the sky was a rare thing, especially those that explode and flash so brightly they light up the entire sky. Here's another one in PA, another state I mentioned where strange activities have been on the rise, including tremors and sinkholes.


"They graze the top of the atmosphere and can stay for quite awhile," Cupillari said. "This fireball was so bright it lit up the entire sky around it. They usually burn up within one to three seconds. There was one I saw years ago that lasted for 5-20 seconds. It's very unusual for them to be so bright and last that long."


It would be nice to hear from FireballStorm on this phenomenon. Are they really occurring more than usual, or are we just receiving better reporting. I know there have been quite a few fireballs over recent months, even several threads here on ATS. I even spotted a fireball that fell straight down in the northern sky on Halloween night. It lasted a few seconds, had a long tail in the sky, but it didn't flash or explode.

Flash in the Sky was a meteor

One thing I find odd about this story is that they say they had a video capture the fireball, but I couldn't find the video to view. Why wouldn't they post the video, and also, why wait till Friday when the flash happened on Monday night, to say the flash was a meteor and 'oh yeah, we have video."

Johnny has proposed that many of these booms and bright flashes are hydrogen sulfide or methane explosions in the atmosphere. This one on Monday could fit into this category if there are no witnesses to an actual fireball streaking across the sky.

But, my other question is why are we seeing these fireballs more commonly all of a sudden? The ones that are actually witnesses and recorded. I only bring it up in this thread because this theory is all about atmospheric heating, where fireballs have their home, and maybe I'm wrong, but it seems they are on the rise just as everything else we've discussed in this thread are.


"Regular meteors can be seen on clear nights and sometimes you can see several in one night, but fireballs aren't very common," Cupillari said. "One night our camera picked up 32 meteors and none of them were fireballs." He added that when virtually all meteors are captured, the sky is black, but the one on Monday night lit up the sky.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 08:41 PM
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One more post tonight


I found this article interesting. Maybe they are really looking for ways to burn off some of those methane hydrates as Johnny had suggested in an earlier post. If this is true they may know more than they are letting on, or they are simply looking for another fuel source.

UCI lab to investigate 'burning ice' fuel source


The two-story lab will duplicate the low-temperature, high-pressure conditions needed to probe the mysteries of methane hydrates. "We're trying to add to the scientific underpinning of what, exactly, it means to have a chunk of ice on fire," said Derek Dunn-Rankin, a UCI engineering professor and the project's lead investigator. Methane hydrates form naturally under freezing temperatures and pressures greater than 100 times that of Earth's atmosphere. They are known to form along continental shelves as well as beneath Arctic permafrost. "They're just cages of water molecules around methane molecules," Dunn-Rankin said. But those simple cages could become the next big thing in fossil fuel extraction.


It says here that they worry about the by-product of burning the hydrates...carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, but methane in the atmosphere is 72 times worse than CO2 over a 20 year period.


Attempts are under way around the world to try to mine methane hydrates, although getting them out of ocean sediments is extremely difficult. And a big worry is a by-product of burning them: carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas that scientists say is the main driver of global warming. In Dunn-Rankin's lab, scientists will explore the physics of using the energy from the methane in place, rather than trying to extract it – and leaving the carbon dioxide buried there. "Rather than potentially damaging that environment, we are re-creating it in the laboratory, so we can study the science associated with it," he said.



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by Rezlooper
 


I think some of these fireballs in the sky are us shooting at the plumes from orbit, using kinetic energy weapons. Lots of secret unknown-payload mongo launches the last few years. That might have been them setting things up. I would bet they're trying kinetic energy weapons and probably lasers or masers too. Kinetic energy weapons are basically 'rock-throwers' - toss a shaped projectile down into the atmosphere, let ablation (atmospheric friction) generate the heat necessary to ignite any gas plumes through which it passes. Make the projectiles too small to do much damage to anything on the ground. The lasers and masers would be rechargeable without reloading missions, but would have to shut down to recharge. So maybe they're using lasers/masers whenever possible, but when they run out of juice then they switch to kinetic energy weapons, occasionally launching a secret Delta IV package up to reload, maybe using that shuttle drone to do remote work. Kinetic energy weapons would also work better than lasers/masers when there's heavy cloud cover, so might have to use them in some situations regardless.

China is probably in on this too, along with every government involved with the International Space Station. There was some area in China that looked like it had been bombed from orbit. Sorry, not gonna look for a link to that, but I think I saw it on 'The Other Place'. That was probably accuracy-testing, and experimentation to get aiming down, and to fine-tune the size of the projectiles, and it's way easier to find a nice big out-of-the-way spot to do that sort of thing in China than in the US or Europe, in part because their military could just keep people away without much question.

Also, I bet the projectiles are copper, or at least the outer covering is, since that'd react with hydrogen sulfide as it ablates, even without the heat, and that means the 'fireballs' that are potentially kinetic energy weapons would burn green or greenish, and a lot of these fireballs ARE green or greenish.
edit on 25-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 10:25 PM
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reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


That's quite a theory. Would explain a lot of phenomenon with the booms and flashes, and the fireballs. If the government knows about the real levels of these dangerous gases and their potential threat to our existence, they most likely wouldn't share what they know. They would have an agenda to do what they could to fix the problem all the while telling us everything is okay. If what you've just posted could be correct, then we've got a secret war on our hands...man vs. mother nature. Can man win?



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 10:47 PM
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Great thread, excellent information. I very much appreciate the time and energy you (all) have put in to this. Scary stuff though- Question on the ozone machines I read a disclaimer that ozone can be bad for people with asthma or breathing trouble anyone know if that is true?

Last night on the news there were 3 house fires here in Nebraska near the Omaha area at least 1 no one was home- no causes yet given.

Great work guys and Thank you!



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 10:48 PM
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Originally posted by Rezlooper
reply to post by JonnyMnemonic
 


That's quite a theory. Would explain a lot of phenomenon with the booms and flashes, and the fireballs. If the government knows about the real levels of these dangerous gases and their potential threat to our existence, they most likely wouldn't share what they know. They would have an agenda to do what they could to fix the problem all the while telling us everything is okay. If what you've just posted could be correct, then we've got a secret war on our hands...man vs. mother nature. Can man win?


Nope, don't think we can win. Buy some time, for some people, yes, I hope so. But how much time? Doesn't look like a whole lot more, just from observing the fires and explosions escalating.

And what I said there, it's completely unproveable. But it also does fit in. Once you accept that the gas problem is for real, then you ask yourself, 'What could be done to buy time, to mitigate or fight off the problem?' Well, orbital attacks on the gas plumes makes complete sense, so then you look for some sign of that, one of which would be green fireballs in the sky. Caffeine reacts with hydrogen sulfide, so has there been any weird caffeine stories? Yep, elevated levels of caffeine found in the waters off the Pacific Northwest, with no apparent reason for it. And in their position, I'd try anything and everything too, even bizarre and whacky-sounding stuff. There's really nothing to lose by trying stuff.

And they apparently are intent on hiding how dire our situation is from us for as long as possible, using Orwellian techniques if necessary. And I understand that...BUT there will come a time when that simply won't work, because the situation will have become just SO bad. And then what? Well, I dunno, but I figure it's about time to start getting ahead of that problem with some truth, so that's what I'm trying to do, as calmly as possible. It's like walking a tight-rope, aiming for the middle of the 'maximum surviving population' bell curve. Wake people too soon and the panic kills too many. Wait too long and everyone is dead. So somewhere in between is the right point. Being on the side of deception they will tend to err on the 'everyone is dead' side of the curve. Being on the side of truth, I might tend to err on the 'panic kills too many' side of the curve. So I'm hoping that equation kinda balances out somewhere in the middle, close to the optimum point which enables the most people to survive.
edit on 25-1-2013 by JonnyMnemonic because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 10:54 PM
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This goes back to that Toronto storm posted above...I forgot to point out how crazy this storm was. Picture this...the middle of January, Canada, a storm of both snow and rain, but with lightning that causes house fires. Absolutely nuts. Thundersnow! Anyone ever hear of this before or experience this. I know this winter here in northern WI in late November we experienced two of these strange Thunderstorms just two weeks apart. The second one went on for three hours from about 4:00 am till 7:00 am. It was dark out and lightning continue flashing for nearly three hours, and this was at the end of November. Unheard of for northern WI, but in this case, there wasn't any reports of house fires from the lightning.


A number of house fires are being pinned on the storm. In Vaughan, the attic of a home near Islington Ave. and Major Mackenzie Dr. caught fire after it was struck by lightning. The residents were at home sleeping when it hit, police said, but managed to escape unscathed.


Source



posted on Jan, 25 2013 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by byGRACE
Great thread, excellent information. I very much appreciate the time and energy you (all) have put in to this. Scary stuff though- Question on the ozone machines I read a disclaimer that ozone can be bad for people with asthma or breathing trouble anyone know if that is true?

Last night on the news there were 3 house fires here in Nebraska near the Omaha area at least 1 no one was home- no causes yet given.

Great work guys and Thank you!


Hah, yeah, they actually use ozone as an indicator of air quality on the ground, with more ozone being bad. But there's bad and there's BAD. Ozone might cause some respiratory distress for asthmatics and the like, yes. Hydrogen sulfide, though, might kill them. I'm not asthmatic and I've been running 3 ozone generators for two years now, and it hasn't bothered me (except when I get the electric bill). If I were asthmatic, would it have bothered me? I do not know. I still would have tried it though, even if I was asthmatic, just to see.





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