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Question about gravity.

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posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 





If earth didn't have a atmosphere. Earth's center wouldn't read much pressure/mass. because there wouldn't be a force pushing the top layers down to the center.

I see. So atmospheric pressure keeps satellites in orbit?




posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by hellobruce

Originally posted by spy66
What gravity force exactly is pooling the mass down to the other end?


The force that causes the object to move of course!


Gravity can be a lot of things. And there is not a lot that can pull on the 10kg mass.


Except gravity...

You still have not explained why you think a vacuum somehow stops gravity....


If you have a infinite vacuum space. In witch direction would the solid travel in this vacuum space?

If you have two solids within this vacuum space would they attract each other? Not necessarily right?
It all depends on their energy out put.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by spy66
 





If earth didn't have a atmosphere. Earth's center wouldn't read much pressure/mass. because there wouldn't be a force pushing the top layers down to the center.

I see. So atmospheric pressure keeps satellites in orbit?


Yes. The satellites are kept in orbit by staying just above our atmosphere in a atmosphere that is close to a vacuum.
edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:21 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


If you have a infinite vacuum space. In witch direction would the solid travel in this vacuum space?
It depends, but assuming all things being equal, it would move toward the nearest, greatest mass.


If you have two solids within this vacuum space would they attract each other? Not necessarily right?
Yes, they would.


It all depends on their energy out put.
No. It doesn't.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:22 PM
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Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by spy66
 





If earth didn't have a atmosphere. Earth's center wouldn't read much pressure/mass. because there wouldn't be a force pushing the top layers down to the center.

I see. So atmospheric pressure keeps satellites in orbit?


Yes. The satellites are kept in orbit by staying just above our atmosphere in a atmosphere that is close to a vacuum.
edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)


The atmosphere acts as a cushion of sorts, keeping the satellites aloft?

What causes them to travel in a curved path rather than fly off into space? Oh, and what moves them?
edit on 31-10-2012 by DenyObfuscation because: sticky shift button



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 





Yes. The satellites are kept in orbit by staying just above our atmosphere in a atmosphere that is close to a vacuum.

Interesting. According to this source
www.globalcomsatphone.com... satellites vary in orbital altitude from 80 miles to over 22,000 miles. Do you still like that theory?



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by spy66
 


If you have a infinite vacuum space. In witch direction would the solid travel in this vacuum space?
It depends, but assuming all things being equal, it would move toward the nearest, greatest mass.


If you have two solids within this vacuum space would they attract each other? Not necessarily right?
Yes, they would.


It all depends on their energy out put.
No. It doesn't.



Yes it would depend on the out put of the other mass or both masses. Two suns would never attract each other. Because their energy out put is to large.

Heat does not attract heat. A cold mass does not attract another cold mass.

If you take a bunch of soccer balls and spread them out in space. They will not bunch up on each other.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by spy66
 





Yes. The satellites are kept in orbit by staying just above our atmosphere in a atmosphere that is close to a vacuum.

Interesting. According to this source
www.globalcomsatphone.com... satellites vary in orbital altitude from 80 miles to over 22,000 miles. Do you still like that theory?


Yeah. Why don't they put long lasting satellites within our atmosphere? Because they would fall faster to the ground.

There is a reason why some are higher than others. It has nothing to to with gravity.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 05:46 PM
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Originally posted by DenyObfuscation

Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by spy66
 





If earth didn't have a atmosphere. Earth's center wouldn't read much pressure/mass. because there wouldn't be a force pushing the top layers down to the center.

I see. So atmospheric pressure keeps satellites in orbit?


Yes. The satellites are kept in orbit by staying just above our atmosphere in a atmosphere that is close to a vacuum.
edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)


The atmosphere acts as a cushion of sorts, keeping the satellites aloft?

What causes them to travel in a curved path rather than fly off into space? Oh, and what moves them?
edit on 31-10-2012 by DenyObfuscation because: sticky shift button


Our atmosphere acts like a cushion if the satellite enters to fast. It is because of atmospheric friction.
But the satellite usually travel to slow to bounce of out into space. They will slow down, break up and fall to the ground.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 06:07 PM
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Originally posted by spy66
Yeah. Why don't they put long lasting satellites within our atmosphere? Because they would fall faster to the ground.

There is a reason why some are higher than others.


Read this en.wikipedia.org...

and you may understand you know nothing at all about gravity and physics.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 07:07 PM
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Originally posted by hellobruce

Originally posted by spy66
Yeah. Why don't they put long lasting satellites within our atmosphere? Because they would fall faster to the ground.

There is a reason why some are higher than others.


Read this en.wikipedia.org...

and you may understand you know nothing at all about gravity and physics.


Are you sure you understand what that link refers to. Read about point mass. All particles have them no matter how large or how small.

Earths atmosphere acts like a force field. The magnetic field acts like a force field. Our atmosphere surrounds earth. With the right speed a satellite can orbit close to earths atmosphere. If it travels to slow the satellite will lose altitude and sink into our atmosphere. If the satellite travels to fast it will gain altitude compare to the spherical angel of the atmosphere and leave earths orbit. Read about how a space shuttle docs a space station. It will explain this.

A satellite that is very far from earth, must travel at a slower speed than satellites close to earth atmosphere. If it travels to fast it will leave earths orbit. Earth atmosphere doesn't stop at a specific distance from earth. Earths atmosphere is gradually reduced as the distance from earth increases. We are using this atmosphere to keep satellits in orbit.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by spy66
Yes it would depend on the out put of the other mass or both masses. Two suns would never attract each other. Because their energy out put is to large.


Are you aware that the sun is a star, and stars do collide with each other on occasion? Some stars in the sky are the result of two stars colliding.


Originally posted by spy66
If you take a bunch of soccer balls and spread them out in space. They will not bunch up on each other.


Actually if they were close enough, and enough time had past, they would bunch up on each other because they all have mass, which bends space and time. So they each have gravity, and would each attract each other.

Your understanding and theory of gravity is so horribly wrong.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


This may save some time. SOHO is in a halo orbit about the L1 point 1,000,000 miles from Earth. Can you explain this without gravity?



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


Double
edit on 31-10-2012 by DenyObfuscation because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by spy66
 


This may save some time. SOHO is in a halo orbit about the L1 point 1,000,000 miles from Earth. Can you explain this without gravity?


This is far of topic. But if you understood what i have said to now, you should know what keeps the SOHO 1,5 million kilometers away from earth. SOHO is situated where earths energy field interacts with the suns energy field. A energy field is a type of atmosphere.
SOHO fallows right at the point where there these two atmospheres interact. I will illustrate with a image.




The SOHO should have traveled faster then earths is orbeting the sun. But since the SOHO is within this point of interaction between the two fields, and as long as it is suituated there it will falllow earths orbit speed around the sun.
edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


So now we have energy fields are a type of atmosphere, and gravity doesn't work in a vacuum. What school do you go to? I need to write them so you can receive some remedial instruction.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by illuminated0ne
 






Are you aware that the sun is a star, and stars do collide with each other on occasion? Some stars in the sky are the result of two stars colliding.


Two suns wouldn't attract each other by gravity. Because gravity would push them apart. If they collide it is of different reasons. It would be like two jet engines tail to tail. They would hardly come close to each other.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 





I will illustrate with a image.

Thanks for that but it shows nothing really.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


Can you give me an example of gravity pushing two objects apart?



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by spy66
Two suns wouldn't attract each other by gravity. Because gravity would push them apart.


So now gravity doesnt attract a object, it pushes it away.... that explains why people and things are constantly being flung away from the earth and moon!

You really have no clue at all, do you!
edit on 31-10-2012 by hellobruce because: (no reason given)



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