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Question about gravity.

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posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:41 PM
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Originally posted by spy66
reply to post by illuminated0ne
 






Are you aware that the sun is a star, and stars do collide with each other on occasion? Some stars in the sky are the result of two stars colliding.


Two suns wouldn't attract each other by gravity. Because gravity would push them apart. If they collide it is of different reasons. It would be like two jet engines tail to tail. They would hardly come close to each other.


OK, seriously, you're just trolling now aren't you? Is your next revelation going to involve some kind of incantation to appease Zeus and keep him from striking us with giant lightening bolts from Mt. Olympus? Do we need to send Hercules to kill the minotaur?

We are not going to participate in burning any witches at the stake, we are not going to have any blood sacrifices and we are not going fall off the edge of the world if we sail too far.




posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by spy66
 


Can you give me an example of gravity pushing two objects apart?


Yes i can. Heat pushes heat apart. That means a hot mass is not attracted to another hod mass. They will not interact physically by gravity. Only the heated particles moving away from the mass will interact with heated particles moving away from the other mass. Have you ever stood by a open fire and felt the heat? Heat moves away from its source.

When these heated particles interact with heated particles from the other mass you will have a compression of heated particles at that point. Like this:





posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


I guess Socrates was called a troll to because he had a better understanding than the crowed. He had to pay with he's life.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 09:00 PM
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Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by spy66
 


Can you give me an example of gravity pushing two objects apart?


Yes i can. Heat pushes heat apart. That means a hot mass is not attracted to another hod mass.


Wow, you are so confused.

First. Why do hot masses on EARTH push on each other?

Second. What does heat have to do with gravity? You have two separate forces here. Now show me an instance where GRAVITY pushes objects apart,



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 09:01 PM
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Originally posted by PurpleChiten

Originally posted by spy66
reply to post by illuminated0ne
 






Are you aware that the sun is a star, and stars do collide with each other on occasion? Some stars in the sky are the result of two stars colliding.


Two suns wouldn't attract each other by gravity. Because gravity would push them apart. If they collide it is of different reasons. It would be like two jet engines tail to tail. They would hardly come close to each other.


OK, seriously, you're just trolling now aren't you? Is your next revelation going to involve some kind of incantation to appease Zeus and keep him from striking us with giant lightening bolts from Mt. Olympus? Do we need to send Hercules to kill the minotaur?

We are not going to participate in burning any witches at the stake, we are not going to have any blood sacrifices and we are not going fall off the edge of the world if we sail too far.


He is obviously trolling, I called as such back on page 5 or something after some comments that a 5 year old would know better than to make.



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by spy66
 


If you have a infinite vacuum space. In witch direction would the solid travel in this vacuum space?
It depends, but assuming all things being equal, it would move toward the nearest, greatest mass.


If you have two solids within this vacuum space would they attract each other? Not necessarily right?
Yes, they would.


It all depends on their energy out put.
No. It doesn't.



Yes it would depend on the out put of the other mass or both masses. Two suns would never attract each other. Because their energy out put is to large.

Heat does not attract heat. A cold mass does not attract another cold mass.

If you take a bunch of soccer balls and spread them out in space. They will not bunch up on each other.


Oh come on, you MUST be trolling.

Do you mean that we have designed all this technology to propel us through space and we could have simply used temperature differences!

Doh!

Now all us scientists and engineers look silly, don't we.


(You just gotta be trollin')



posted on Oct, 31 2012 @ 11:23 PM
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Originally posted by spy66
If you take a bunch of soccer balls and spread them out in space. They will not bunch up on each other.


Actually, yes they will, so long as no other body is exerting more force on them. If you put them in their own separate universe with no other bodies in it, they eventually will bunch up.

Your lack of understanding is simply astounding.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:51 AM
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Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by spy66
 



Maybe you can tell me what exact force that is pulling the 10kg mass down.

Gravity. Remove the vacuum tunnel from the equation for a moment. Place the mass on the ground. Where does the mass go? It's not flying away just because the vacuum tunnel is gone, right? It stays on the ground, why? What is keeping it on the ground? If you think it's something other than gravity say so now. If you agree it's gravity holding it down then add the vacuum tunnel now. The same gravity is still there but the ground has been replaced by the vacuum tunnel enabling the mass to fall. This doesn't change the gravity pulling the mass down, you've only removed the earth that was supporting the mass. Are you with me so far?



Well if we remove the vacuum tunnel. It is the atmosphere that keeps the 10kg to the ground.

The atmosphere that keeps the 10kg mass down comes from particles/gasses produced from earths solids,water and plants. Earths mass in it self doesn't keep the 10kg mass on the ground.

If earth didn't have a atmosphere. Earth's center wouldn't read much pressure/mass. because there wouldn't be a force pushing the top layers down to the center.
edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)

If the atmosphere holds the mass down, then what holds the atmosphere down?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 01:54 AM
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Originally posted by PurpleChiten

Originally posted by renegadeloser
reply to post by PurpleChiten
 


"Because he was self trained, however, he had no grasp of mathematics and could therefore not understand a word of Ampère's papers."
wolfram
You saying that he had no formal backround in math, but could still do it, is good and all. Except that it simply is not true. That Faraday had little ability in math is a well documented, and well known, fact of science history. You want to ignore the fact, because in your world view a man can't be good at science, or as a thinker, unless he has a grasp of mathematics. You're blinded by your bias.

Go read a biography or ask an expert in science history. That Faraday had little ability in math is a fact.


As a professor of Mathematics, I disagree. Nomenclature is not what math is about, it's how math is communicated. He was very capable of mathematics and used it, he just didn't communicate in the language of mathematics. "little ability" and "no ability" are two very different things.
He used mathematical concepts on a regular basis, he didn't use mathematical notation to communicate his ideas. That doesn't mean he didn't use math, it just means he didn't write his findings with mathematical nomenclature.

Math is not a set of symbols and equations, it's a way of thinking. It is a science unto itself, actually the most pure of sciences. He didn't have a formal education in mathematics so he didn't use the nomenclature or equations. He DID use the concepts and ideas of mathematics. Not all math is formal, just as not all physics is formal nor is all of anything formal....except maybe formalities



touche



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 02:43 AM
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The sad thing is...I knew where OP was going with this the second he stated it the way he did.

I have known several people who thought that gravity was caused by atmospheric weight pushing them down to the planet. I don't know where that comes from. "People in space float around because there's no atmosphere"

Sheesh.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 05:06 AM
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Originally posted by renegadeloser

Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by DenyObfuscation
reply to post by spy66
 



Maybe you can tell me what exact force that is pulling the 10kg mass down.

Gravity. Remove the vacuum tunnel from the equation for a moment. Place the mass on the ground. Where does the mass go? It's not flying away just because the vacuum tunnel is gone, right? It stays on the ground, why? What is keeping it on the ground? If you think it's something other than gravity say so now. If you agree it's gravity holding it down then add the vacuum tunnel now. The same gravity is still there but the ground has been replaced by the vacuum tunnel enabling the mass to fall. This doesn't change the gravity pulling the mass down, you've only removed the earth that was supporting the mass. Are you with me so far?



Well if we remove the vacuum tunnel. It is the atmosphere that keeps the 10kg to the ground.

The atmosphere that keeps the 10kg mass down comes from particles/gasses produced from earths solids,water and plants. Earths mass in it self doesn't keep the 10kg mass on the ground.

If earth didn't have a atmosphere. Earth's center wouldn't read much pressure/mass. because there wouldn't be a force pushing the top layers down to the center.
edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)

If the atmosphere holds the mass down, then what holds the atmosphere down?


I have answered this one before.

Our atmosphere consists of gasses with different weight/mass. The lighter the gas is the further up it will be.
The lighter gasses keep heavier gasses from traveling up. Our atmosphere comes from particles emitted from earths solids, plants and water.

A weather balloon raises up because of the weight of the gas inside the balloon is lighter than the gases close to the surface. If you fill the balloon with air it will not raise unless it is heated up.




edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 05:18 AM
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reply to post by spy66
 


What prevents the gasses from floating off into space?

Does the moon have gravity? Does it have atmosphere?

How much atmosphere does Mars have? What is it's gravity like?
edit on 1-11-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 06:40 AM
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Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by renegadeloser
If the atmosphere holds the mass down, then what holds the atmosphere down?


The lighter gasses keep heavier gasses from traveling up.


So... what keeps the lighter gasses from travelling up?
(and please dont say even lighter gasses)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 07:10 AM
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reply to post by spy66
 



Our atmosphere consists of gasses with different weight/mass.

Why does mass have weight in the first place?

Why does that weight vary according to the intensity of the gravity exerted upon it? For example, why does something weigh less on the Moon than on Earth?

Why would anything remain on the Moon's surface with virtually no atmosphere to hold it down?

You seem pretty confident in your beliefs so it's pointless to tell you that you're wrong. If you're honest enough with yourself then you'll realize it yourself.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 07:19 AM
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reply to post by spy66
 


So !! This is why galaxies don't collide. I often wondered about that.

Oh! Wait!

They do. Oh well, never mind.

edit on 1-11-2012 by seriousskeptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by spy66


I have answered this one before.

Our atmosphere consists of gasses with different weight/mass. The lighter the gas is the further up it will be.
The lighter gasses keep heavier gasses from traveling up. Our atmosphere comes from particles emitted from earths solids, plants and water.

A weather balloon raises up because of the weight of the gas inside the balloon is lighter than the gases close to the surface. If you fill the balloon with air it will not raise unless it is heated up.




edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)


Now that we know the crux of the problem we can address it more directly.

The atmosphere is made up of gases and those gases are held close to the planet due to gravity. The atmosphere doesn't create gravity, gravity creates the atmosphere (to an extent by holding in the gases that make up the atmosphere).

The moon doesn't have an atmosphere due to it's small mass, but it does have gravity, 1/6 that of earth since it's mass is 1/6 that of the earth.

Another thing you'll have to keep in mind is volume. Volume and mass are not the same thing. Something can appear very large, such as Jupiter, yet the mass isn't in the same proportion to our mass as the volume is. It appears much much larger due to it's larger volume, about 1300 times the size of the earth, but its gravity is only about 300 times the gravity on earth because Jupiter is made primarily of gases. This makes its mass much lower. Gravity is determined by mass.

You can start here and then move on to look at the states of matter to help you gain a better understanding of the interactions. en.wikipedia.org...



edit on 1-11-2012 by PurpleChiten because: corrected my numerical errors



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:06 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by spy66
 


What prevents the gasses from floating off into space?

Does the moon have gravity? Does it have atmosphere?

How much atmosphere does Mars have? What is it's gravity like?
edit on 1-11-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)


The moon has a thin layer of atmosphere. Gravity at surface is 1.662m/s2 0.1654g

Mars has a atmosphere. If not it wouldn't have sand storms right?



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:12 AM
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Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by spy66
 


What prevents the gasses from floating off into space?

Does the moon have gravity? Does it have atmosphere?

How much atmosphere does Mars have? What is it's gravity like?
edit on 1-11-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)


The moon has a thin layer of atmosphere. Gravity at surface is 1.662m/s2 0.1654g

Mars has a atmosphere. If not it wouldn't have sand storms right?


It has a negligible atmosphere because it doesn't have enough mass to provide the gravitational force to sustain an atmosphere other than a light coating of gases at its surface



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:13 AM
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Originally posted by PurpleChiten

Originally posted by spy66


I have answered this one before.

Our atmosphere consists of gasses with different weight/mass. The lighter the gas is the further up it will be.
The lighter gasses keep heavier gasses from traveling up. Our atmosphere comes from particles emitted from earths solids, plants and water.

A weather balloon raises up because of the weight of the gas inside the balloon is lighter than the gases close to the surface. If you fill the balloon with air it will not raise unless it is heated up.




edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)


Now that we know the crux of the problem we can address it more directly.

The atmosphere is made up of gases and those gases are held close to the planet due to gravity. The atmosphere doesn't create gravity, gravity creates the atmosphere (to an extent by holding in the gases that make up the atmosphere).

The moon doesn't have an atmosphere due to it's small mass, but it does have gravity, 1/6 that of earth since it's mass is 1/6 that of the earth.

Another thing you'll have to keep in mind is volume. Volume and mass are not the same thing. Something can appear very large, such as Jupiter, yet the mass isn't in the same proportion to our mass as the volume is. It appears much much larger due to it's larger volume, about 1300 times the size of the earth, but its gravity is only about 300 times the gravity on earth because Jupiter is made primarily of gases. This makes its mass much lower. Gravity is determined by mass.

You can start here and then move on to look at the states of matter to help you gain a better understanding of the interactions. en.wikipedia.org...



edit on 1-11-2012 by PurpleChiten because: corrected my numerical errors


The Moon has a atmosphere. Look it up.

And you are wrong about earths atmosphere.
Earth emits energy outwards from the center and up through the layers and into the atmosphere. This creates a thin layer of atmosphere at the surface. Our sun heats up earths surface which makes the solid particles emit energies. The sun also heat up our atmosphere making our atmosphere expand upwards because of heated particles.



posted on Nov, 1 2012 @ 08:16 AM
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Originally posted by PurpleChiten

Originally posted by spy66

Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by spy66
 


What prevents the gasses from floating off into space?

Does the moon have gravity? Does it have atmosphere?

How much atmosphere does Mars have? What is it's gravity like?
edit on 1-11-2012 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)


The moon has a thin layer of atmosphere. Gravity at surface is 1.662m/s2 0.1654g

Mars has a atmosphere. If not it wouldn't have sand storms right?


It has a negligible atmosphere because it doesn't have enough mass to provide the gravitational force to sustain an atmosphere other than a light coating of gases at its surface


If the Moon had a thicker atmosphere. The Moons center would have more mass. Because of the pressure from the atmosphere above pushing on the surface.
edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)



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