Moon Landing Hoax - The Space Suit

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posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:07 AM
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Im off to bed anyway so i'll have a look at the info wen I get up.. Peace..




posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:12 AM
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I actually thought the same as you and was talking with a friend about this, neither of us knew the details and after looking further into it and understanding the physics of blackbody radiation in space one understand how this is done.

en.wikipedia.org...

Space applications Astronauts commonly wear a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment in order to maintain a comfortable core body temperature during extra-vehicular activity (EVA). The LCVG accomplishes this task by circulating cool water through a network of flexible tubes in direct contact with the astronaut's skin. The water draws heat away from the body, resulting in a lower core temperature. The water then returns to the Primary Life Support System (PLSS), where it is cooled in a heat exchanger before being recirculated. In an independent space suit, the heat is ultimately transferred to a thin sheet of ice (formed by a separate feed water source). Due to the extremely low pressure in space, the heated ice sublimates directly to water vapor, which is then vented away from the suit. In a dependent space suit (such as the ones used in the Gemini program or within lunar orbit on the Apollo program), the heat is carried back to a host spacecraft through an umbilical connection, where it is ultimately radiated or sublimated via the spacecraft's own thermal control system. Because the space environment is essentially a vacuum, heat cannot be lost through heat convection, and can only be directly dissipated through thermal radiation, a much slower process. Thus, even though the environment of space can be extremely cold, excessive heat build-up is inevitable. Without an LCVG, there would be no means by which to expel this heat, and it would affect not only EVA performance, but the health of the suit occupant as well. The LCVG used with the Apollo/Skylab A7L suit could remove heat at a rate of approximately 586 watts.[1] The LCVG used with NASA's Extravehicular Mobility Unit is primarily constructed of spandex, with a nylon tricot liner.[2] The tubes are made of polyvinyl chloride.


I had learned more that day and admitted I was wrong, although there are still many things about space/NASA/physics that I think are not exactly the way they explain.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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Apparently, the cooling system in the space suits doesn't require an atmosphere. It uses the vacuum of space to sublimate, not evaproate, the ice. The ice used in the heat exchanger turns directly from sold to vapor

Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment

A Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG) is a form-fitting garment that is used to remove body heat from the wearer in environments where evaporative cooling from sweating and open air convection cooling does not work, or the wearer has a biological problem that hinders self-regulation of body temperature.


Space applications

Astronauts commonly wear a Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment in order to maintain a comfortable core body temperature during extra-vehicular activity (EVA). The LCVG accomplishes this task by circulating cool water through a network of flexible tubes in direct contact with the astronaut's skin. The water draws heat away from the body, resulting in a lower core temperature. The water then returns to the Primary Life Support System (PLSS), where it is cooled in a heat exchanger before being recirculated. In an independent space suit, the heat is ultimately transferred to a thin sheet of ice (formed by a separate feed water source). Due to the extremely low pressure in space, the heated ice sublimates directly to water vapor, which is then vented away from the suit. In a dependent space suit (such as the ones used in the Gemini program or within lunar orbit on the Apollo program), the heat is carried back to a host spacecraft through an umbilical connection, where it is ultimately radiated or sublimated via the spacecraft's own thermal control system.

Because the space environment is essentially a vacuum, heat cannot be lost through heat convection, and can only be directly dissipated through thermal radiation, a much slower process. Thus, even though the environment of space can be extremely cold, excessive heat build-up is inevitable. Without an LCVG, there would be no means by which to expel this heat, and it would affect not only EVA performance, but the health of the suit occupant as well. The LCVG used with the Apollo/Skylab A7L suit could remove heat at a rate of approximately 586 watts.[1]

The LCVG used with NASA's Extravehicular Mobility Unit is primarily constructed of spandex, with a nylon tricot liner.[2] The tubes are made of polyvinyl chloride.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:16 AM
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reply to post by Maslo
 


On Apollo 11-14 the PLSS carried 3.9 liters of water on 15-17 the PLSS carried 5.2 liters of water or 1.03 and 1.37gallons of water for us non-metric dummies


Fully charged PLSSs were loaded onto the LM before launch, which saved considerable time before the first EVA. For subsequent EVAs, the crews retrieved fresh batteries and lithium hydroxide canisters during EVA close-out activities for use the next day. Recharging the PLSS was a six-step process. Usually done as part of the EVA prep, a few crews used spare time at the end of their workday to replenish the PLSS consumables. The process took about 30 minutes for each suit, and each crewmember worked on their own equipment. By staggering tasks, the entire process took less than an hour.

First, the battery and the lithium hydroxide canister were exchanged for fresh units. Used batteries and canisters were stored in large bags that were thrown under the descent stage at the beginning of the next day's EVA, or jettisoned out the front hatch after the last EVA of the mission. Next, oxygen cylinders in the PLSSs were charged from the descent stage high-pressure oxygen supply in a two step process. First, a charge that filled the PLSS O2 cylinders to about 90% capacity was performed. After a few minutes (to allow the cylinders to cool), the O2 supply was "topped off" to about 95% to 98%. Finally, a three-step procedure was used to service the water management system. Step 1 was to recharge the cooling water supply. Draining the waste water was the second step, and the third step was to vent out the excess gas from the cooling water system. Bubbles formed by such gas could interfere with the flow of cooling water in the suit.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:22 AM
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Originally posted by OccamAssassin
Wow.....It seems that no one has even come close to investigating this for themselves and will gladly form their own view of reality based on a post in a conspiracy forum.

Deny ignorance people....please.

The space suits cooling system is fluid based. It requires no atmosphere to work as it cools the liquid in the shade created by the backpack enclosure on the space suits.

This is pretty well documented and if you check out the system used by the Russians.....you will find their system to be almost identical in principle.



NO NO NO NO NO!!!!!

Don't you know? Morpheous told NEO all about it man! I mean, how can you deny that evidence.

Morpheous, dude... MORPHEOUS!!!!

If that's enough evidence for some, then surely we have been wrong all along if we ever assumed we went to the moon.

Morpheous dude, are you insane?



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:23 AM
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Originally posted by strafgod
Reply to post by toocoolnc
 


Oh I don't disagree with you there. NASA (never a straight answer)



 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



NASA should change their name to NAGEA.

Never a good enough answer.

Because, even when it's laid out in front of people, it's not good enough because those pink unicorns just might exist you know.

Just might...



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by N3k9Ni
 


great minds think alike



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:28 AM
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So u believe it must be true because the data is from NASA?



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:29 AM
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reply to post by GhettoRice
 


I noticed that.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by toocoolnc
 


You need to quote who you're replying to, and also cite references when you include external text as it makes it easier to follow.



Me, if you mean, then I have no reason to doubt it. None. Cui bono? All that effort in hoaxing it, all the people silenced... so much energy in faking something that has absolutely no impact on anyone. Cui bono?

It makes more sense to me that man has been to the moon. Because if I believed otherwise, I would not have anything different in my life. It is a pointless argument.

I wonder if those university students who sent a mobile phone into the lower atmosphere using balloons, were also pulling a swifty on the public? At least they get to have 5 minutes of fame on youtube.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:44 AM
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Originally posted by toocoolnc
So u believe it must be true because the data is from NASA?


Not really that, it's more that it works on principals that you can see at work in the world on earth, like when you use a cO2 duster(gets cold) or when scientists use the cascading pressure effect to make liquid helium or bose einstein condensates.

It's not mere belief in NASA, it's things I can see and touch that allow me to conceptualize the effects at hand.

This is a good Documentary on heat that later on shows the effects I was talking about, and it's just damn cool.

edit on 6-4-2012 by GhettoRice because: clarification
edit on 6-4-2012 by GhettoRice because: (no reason given)
edit on 6-4-2012 by GhettoRice because: I swear I can't spell(wait is this right?)



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:54 AM
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Originally posted by toocoolnc
So u believe it must be true because the data is from NASA?


I'm inclined to believe that the people that work at NASA, with advanced degrees in chemistry, physics, engineering, biology and who knows what else, are better able to understand how space suits, space craft, and space flight work than the majority of the general public.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 02:25 AM
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Originally posted by toocoolnc
The physics explained by cooper seem logical.. Unless someone can decipher or conclude an alternative theory?


He's no engineer, that's for sure.

The rate at which solar energy will heat the suit depend on the reflectivity of the suit material, the thermal conductivity of the suit material, and the insulative qualities of the suit material. There's a reason the suits weren't a fashionable black. Cooper's rather simplistic assumption that everything in the open during daylight instantly becomes 270F is naive if not intentionally misleading.

Next, the sublimator works. His statement about trace ice in dark craters is meaningless: they're not sublimating because they're in the dark and the soil underneath is cold. It's a bit different story when the ice is formed on a heat exchanger that's got suit loop coolant running through it.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 02:29 AM
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So what if they did fake it, What does that proove? What difference would that make in what you believe... ?



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 02:30 AM
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Originally posted by LucidDreamer85
What temp is space then if it's not cold ? Would it be the perfect neutral temp and the only reason we think of space as cold is because of how close our ISS and Astronauts are still to earth.


It doesn't have a temperature, since temperature is a measurement of molecular motion. Nothing much in space to have a temperature.

What you've got to ask is, what are the sinks and sources for radiative transfer.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 04:01 AM
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Actually space has a temperature. You can calculate it from the background radiation spectrum. It is 2.725K.

This means any object in the vacuum of the space will approach this value, cool by radiation(see black-body radiation). There is no need for a medium.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 04:27 AM
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In an independent space suit, the heat is ultimately transferred to a thin sheet of ice (formed by a separate feed water source). Due to the extremely low pressure in space, the heated ice sublimates directly to water vapor, which is then vented away from the suit.


So where the heck does the thin sheet of ice come from?
It says it is formed by a separate feed water source. How?????????????????
How does the ice form in the first place?
Ice is formed by cooling water, but in the vacuum of space the water would sublimate before turning to ice. Furthermore, how the heck would the water be cooled enough to turn to ice in the first place? If there is something that can cool the water down enough to form ice, then what's the point of the sublimator in the first place?

Do they take the ice up with them? That doesn't seem very likely.

I've checked out the NASA link that one of the posters provided but it does not go into any meaningful detail on the sublimator. It's a very vauge description that just doesn't provide enough detail on how the sublimator works.
I also checked around online for a description of how the sublimator works, but I keep finding the same type of vauge description as in the quote above.

There are also patents out there for sublimators for space applications, but again, they don't really give a good explanation of how they work.

Can anyone find a really good explanation of how the sublimators work? Specifically, where the heck does the ice come from? How does it form? Specifically in a vacuum.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 05:24 AM
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reply to post by totalperdition
 


There is a bit of assumed knowledge in a lot of tech. NASA descriptions are no exception.

In this case, it is the effect of taking a liquid or gas(our subject) from one pressure to another.

As we increase the pressure....our subject will get hotter.

As we decrease the pressure....our subject will get colder.

This principle is what meets modern man's refrigeration needs.

Now, if we look at the conditions of the water in the suit as it is sprayed onto the coils, we find that the water goes from a pressurised vessel to a near perfect vacuum. The water wants to immediately go from a liquid state to a vapour state.

The small amount of heat in the liquid water gets spread over a very large area due to the state change. This in turn means that the vapour exiting the valve inside the space suit onto the coil is very cold(WRT the initial temperature of the pressurised water).
edit on 6/4/2012 by OccamAssassin because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 05:45 AM
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Originally posted by totalperdition



In an independent space suit, the heat is ultimately transferred to a thin sheet of ice (formed by a separate feed water source). Due to the extremely low pressure in space, the heated ice sublimates directly to water vapor, which is then vented away from the suit.


So where the heck does the thin sheet of ice come from?
It says it is formed by a separate feed water source. How?????????????????
How does the ice form in the first place?
Ice is formed by cooling water, but in the vacuum of space the water would sublimate before turning to ice. Furthermore, how the heck would the water be cooled enough to turn to ice in the first place? If there is something that can cool the water down enough to form ice, then what's the point of the sublimator in the first place?

Do they take the ice up with them? That doesn't seem very likely.

I've checked out the NASA link that one of the posters provided but it does not go into any meaningful detail on the sublimator. It's a very vauge description that just doesn't provide enough detail on how the sublimator works.
I also checked around online for a description of how the sublimator works, but I keep finding the same type of vauge description as in the quote above.

There are also patents out there for sublimators for space applications, but again, they don't really give a good explanation of how they work.

Can anyone find a really good explanation of how the sublimators work? Specifically, where the heck does the ice come from? How does it form? Specifically in a vacuum.


Star for this, and exactly my question out of MANY I've had, to include the amount of oxygen needed for the entire trip, even with scrubbers/re-breathers, which were fairly new in the 60's .. the ocean is also a airless enviroment.. the hole gets MUCH deeper when you think about airless enviroments..

scubba diving ..now there's a subject NASA needs to study up on .. IMO !



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 06:09 AM
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reply to post by Komodo
 





Star for this, and exactly my question out of MANY I've had, to include the amount of oxygen needed for the entire trip, even with scrubbers/re-breathers, which were fairly new in the 60's

They were new in the forties.

.. the ocean is also a airless enviroment..

In complete contrast to what? An oxygen-deficient environment?

the hole gets MUCH deeper when you think about airless enviroments.. scubba diving ..now there's a subject NASA needs to study up on .. IMO !


NASA is home to one of the worlds most advanced SCUBA diving training and test facilities.

Everything is that has to be accomplished by humans in space is practised in a water tank with the astronauts surrounded by SCUBA divers.





 
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