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The Templar Uprising

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posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by Xoanon
 


I don't think I could have a constructive conversation about Balphomet. My side would go much like it already has. It would start with "Bwahahahah", and end with me wiping the tears out of my eye from laughter. But I will say there are many groups that exist today and claim to be templars. Like the original ones. One group even has permission to meet at Rosslyn Chapel. There was a thread a while back where some of that information was presented. I don't know how much stock I would put into a secretive group with a website, but who knows.

If I find that thread, I will link it.




posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 





I don't think I could have a constructive conversation about Balphomet. My side would go much like it already has. It would start with "Bwahahahah", and end with me wiping the tears out of my eye from laughter.


Technically, since the winner of the debate would be based upon whom garnered the most popular support, they could very well be tears of frustration.

Please post the Rosslyn thing, sounds awesome.

Nice to meet you.

X.



posted on Jan, 27 2012 @ 06:15 PM
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Originally posted by network dude
reply to post by Xoanon
 


I don't think I could have a constructive conversation about Balphomet. My side would go much like it already has. It would start with "Bwahahahah", and end with me wiping the tears out of my eye from laughter. But I will say there are many groups that exist today and claim to be templars. Like the original ones. One group even has permission to meet at Rosslyn Chapel. There was a thread a while back where some of that information was presented. I don't know how much stock I would put into a secretive group with a website, but who knows.

If I find that thread, I will link it.


I know Rosslyn chapel also spelt Roslin located near Edinburgh in "Bonnie Scotland" - Beautiful Chapel and old castle near - also near is Roslin Institute where the famous "Dolly the Sheep" was cloned - I beleive poor Dolly suffered ill health and died - such is the stupidity of those interfering with natures laws.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


I found it. Here is the group I was talking about.

It came from this thread.



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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Bring me my sword forged in the stars
Protect me my brother's shield of Mars
Come sweet muse fly your gilded cage
Here by love's fountain we are strong

another verse from "Giuliano's Song"
by me
edit on 28-1-2012 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2012 @ 12:45 PM
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Yes,

All roads lead to the Templars and Rome

I also found myself the last few years compelled to research them...and learn more

bam...not only the 1st international bankers, but 1st global corporation

and of course, occult religious beliefs behind them...like this whole babylonian/sumer sun cult stuff too


Wait til you learn its very possible the Templars founded America many years before Columbus

your jaw will drop



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 04:20 AM
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Originally posted by SuperTripps
Yes,

All roads lead to the Templars and Rome


I think that you will find that while some roads lead to Rome, that there are plenty of routes out for those who, over centuries, sought freedom from that oppression. And as the Templars found, one of those roads goes to Britain.

The Templars were excommunicated by the Pope as part of their persecution, mainly at the insistence of Philip of France who was heavily indebted to the Templars and not only didn't want to pay back those loans, but also had his eye on all their wealth and territory. The Templars in Britain were protected by the people, not the King, of Britain, who respected and admired them, and also stood up in court and spoke in their favour against the Churches inquisitor. This of course was aided by the fact that, unlike everywhere else in Europe, torture was forbidden in English court proceedings.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by Biliverdin
 

The Templar Inquisition was really pushed by the French Crown and supported by the puppet Pope. In fact the Chinon Parchment shows that the Papacy dismissed the charges, but still dissolved the Templars. The Templars did own a lot of property, particularly in Southern France.

The Templars in Germany also weren't prosecuted too much. One particular instance was that a group of Templars showed up to trial in full armor, their presence was such that they were "miraculously" found not guilty.



posted on Jan, 30 2012 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by KSigMason
The Templars in Germany also weren't prosecuted too much. One particular instance was that a group of Templars showed up to trial in full armor, their presence was such that they were "miraculously" found not guilty.


Haha...I should imagine they were a formidable sight, and sound for that matter. At the Royal Armouries in Leeds (UK) they have a number of examples of German armour, and it is quite something to behold. As are the weaponry...incredibly beautiful too, but the helmets in particular are quite fierce looking, more so than any of the other nations...and generally blackened steel, so all the more menacing.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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Okay then. I've been looking at the battle of Marathon, and I suspect that the Templar equivalent in Islam may be taking the form of The Immortals والخالدون



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by Biliverdin
 




What i dont know yet is what side were the templars on and still on today?

Seems to have been some splits there with rome but at same time templars were the bankers

What if french king was doing the right thing forthe people



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 10:59 PM
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posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 11:18 PM
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Originally posted by SuperTripps
What if french king was doing the right thing forthe people


Oh wait. You were serious? "Philip the Fair" was Hitler, 600 years earlier. He expelled the Jews, taking all their money… He taxed the catholic monks 50% of their anual income. He was a greedy bastard that didn't give a flying # about his people.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 11:48 PM
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Originally posted by JoshNorton

Originally posted by SuperTripps
What if french king was doing the right thing forthe people


Oh wait. You were serious? "Philip the Fair" was Hitler, 600 years earlier. He expelled the Jews, taking all their money… He taxed the catholic monks 50% of their anual income. He was a greedy bastard that didn't give a flying # about his people.


Think outside the box for a second and suspend the racism line
Miraculously jews become amazing bankers and merchants who dont have a home nation as they are so spread out
Every generation or 2 for 2000+ years this class of people pisses off a society

Whether jesus losing his mind and kicking out the money lenders
To king philip and vatican kicking out templars to hitler kicking out the jews
Its the same story this unending banker religion that manisfests seems to be a pattern
Does it not?
Today its the occupy wall st stuff and ron paul anti federal reserve folks speakibg up

What if there is a very good reason as bad as it sounds in all these cases that the actors are acting out on



So as evil as hitler was what if beyond the race hate he actually was trying to get the cabal bankers too?



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by SuperTripps
 

With the various perpetuation and continuation myths of the Knights Templar, you could say that the hypothetical Templars that still exist have various motives and ideologies. I'd really love to find some documentation to show more than just assumptions of what happened in the post Templar Inquisition years as well as the central archive of Templar documentation.

I'm currently researching the connection between Sufism, Druze, Rosicrucians, and the Templars.

reply to post by SuperTripps
 

Phillip the Fair was a tyrant.
edit on 31-1-2012 by KSigMason because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 08:05 AM
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Originally posted by SuperTripps
reply to post by Biliverdin
 




What i dont know yet is what side were the templars on and still on today?

Seems to have been some splits there with rome but at same time templars were the bankers

What if french king was doing the right thing forthe people


Well if you look at what happened to the Cathars in France you would very quickly have the answer to that question.



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by Biliverdin
 


Very interesting group.

And I believe a famous quote came from them:

"Kill em all, let God sort em out"


Arnold Aimery, the Papal Legate at the siege of Beziers, ordered his men: "Show mercy neither to order, nor to age, nor to sex....Cathar or Catholic, Kill them all... God will know his own....". Catharism finally vanished from the stage of history by the end of the 14th century. But, since the final, fateful siege of Monsegur in 1244, the Cathars, and their memory, continue to fascinate many people today.


interesting source article



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by Biliverdin
 

The study of the Albigensian Crusade is interesting. Living in Idaho we have the second largest community of Basque people in the world, and they have an interesting culture (and they were located near the same area the Cathars were).



posted on Feb, 1 2012 @ 11:03 AM
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Originally posted by Biliverdin

Originally posted by SuperTripps
reply to post by Biliverdin
 




What i dont know yet is what side were the templars on and still on today?

Seems to have been some splits there with rome but at same time templars were the bankers

What if french king was doing the right thing forthe people


Well if you look at what happened to the Cathars in France you would very quickly have the answer to that question.


everyone knows that story...there were also the teutonic knights and knights of malta/hospitalier

very easy to oversimplify



posted on Feb, 2 2012 @ 06:06 AM
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Originally posted by SuperTripps

Originally posted by Biliverdin

Originally posted by SuperTripps
reply to post by Biliverdin
 




What i dont know yet is what side were the templars on and still on today?

Seems to have been some splits there with rome but at same time templars were the bankers

What if french king was doing the right thing forthe people


Well if you look at what happened to the Cathars in France you would very quickly have the answer to that question.


everyone knows that story...there were also the teutonic knights and knights of malta/hospitalier

very easy to oversimplify


Yes, but Philip wasnt indebted to any of those groups, I don't see your point. There were a great number of orders, almost one for every state that participated in the various crusades, and that was an expansive motion over a number of centuries. The very point of the crusades was to claim new territories, and those claims led to new vassal states being created as reward for that service. Some of those gains were subsequently lost, and the orders automatically and responsively contracted. The Templars however were formed as guardians of pilgrimage routes, not exclusively, but that eventually became their primary role, and, as part of that role, they offered a credit system, that permitted pilgrims to deposit their possessions, or cash, with the Templars at their point of departure, for which they were issued a letter of credit. On reaching their destination, they could then redeem that letter of credt for the funds deposited. In doing so, they were protected from theft on their journey. It is likely, though I am not well enough informed to confirm, that this was extended to some traders too. Additionally, they served as tax and tythe collectors for the Papal lands in whichever territory they held. Hence why the Pope realised that backing Philip's persecution was a mistake, as many of the lands that the Templars had protected for the Pope were lost to local lords and Kings.

The Templars ceased to exist, those who wished to remain in service to the Papacy, as warrior monks, or just as monks, were absorbed by the other orders, most particularly the Order of St John, but many others were assimilated into the local laity and possibly, though again I do not know for certain, formed the basis of professional armies independent of the Church, as well as passing their banking expertise onto those who had defended and protected them.

I am sure that if you pop into your local library, or even search a little on-line you will be able to find historical sources that will enable you to answer your own questions in more detail.
edit on 2-2-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)





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