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AntiSec and Anonymous release 860,000 Accounts and 75,000 stolen Credit Cards from STRATFOR hack

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posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 03:40 AM
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I'm guessing Anonymous is a shadow division of the NSA. Don't fall for this staged release of info people. This is a classic false flag event designed to get public opinion behind the new internet laws now in front of congress. FFS you have to start to think people before it's too late!




posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 03:47 AM
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Originally posted by AnonyWarp
A lot of surprises are about to come soon
but as usual, nones listen the sent warnings, even on ATSn nones listen


What Anon should do now is some data mining.

Not releasing just everything, but releasing targeted, pertinent data.

Who cares if its honeypot data. Make use of it to cause embarrassment and division in the government.

I couldn't care less about the US government poisoning their own internet with SOPA. Cut off its free access to knowledge, dumb down its populace and be pushed aside by technologically superior countries. Oh yeah...!

It's already the end of the American Empire, this will just grease the downward slide.

Whoosh...


edit on 30/12/2011 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 04:21 AM
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Originally posted by ErroneousDylan
reply to post by sarra1833
 


If this is Anonymous and not some group in the government hiding under the "Anonymous" name then they don't give two hoots about the credit card numbers.

Their main reason is to send a message and to do it for the lulz (do it for laughs). Also, it will create a bit of havoc which is part of the whole sceme. It is exactly what they want if they have thought it out far enough.
edit on 30-12-2011 by ErroneousDylan because: Green and italic.


Exactly and by releasing ccs it also gets maximum media exposure which is their aim here in getting out the message about Manning. These guys are good, if youve read any of the leaked emails from the past there are statements like "We cant stop these guys, they go where they like" I think that was Infraguard

At least by leaking the ccs they can get blocked by the card issuers? O yeah we've seen this happen before and they don't give a sh1t enough to act and will just deny anything was compromised to protect their image. Bottom line these details were there for the taking and now they are out. Security failed again.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 04:30 AM
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reply to post by trustnothing
 


Well, many people believe (and it is a pretty good theory) that it was a bait. I mean, how could a global intelligence company not encrypt their user-data? That is completely amateur and not something anyone would expect. So, perhaps they were idiots and allowed their precious data to get robbed from them. Or, perhaps AntiSec foolishly retrieved the information and created a catalyst to usher in SOPA. Maybe they were paid by the government to do this for SOPA. Or.. maybe they are actually the government. Who knows? Not I.
edit on 30-12-2011 by ErroneousDylan because: Look at this text... it is green and italic. How silly.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 04:34 AM
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Originally posted by ErroneousDylan
reply to post by trustnothing
 


Well, many people believe (and it is a pretty good theory) that it was a bait. I mean, how could a global intelligence company not encrypt their user-data? That is completely amateur and not something anyone would expect. So, perhaps they were idiots and allowed their precious data to get robbed from them. Or, perhaps AntiSec foolishly retrieved the information and created a catalyst to usher in SOPA. Maybe they were paid by the government to do this for SOPA. Or.. maybe they are actually the government. Who knows? Not I.
edit on 30-12-2011 by ErroneousDylan because: Look at this text... it is green and italic. How silly.


I think that anon should buy 75,000 $100 dinners and send them all to whatever holding facility has Bradley Manning.

Well, it's the least they can do. At least he's likely to get a good feed out of it.

edit on 30/12/2011 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 04:45 AM
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Originally posted by ErroneousDylan
reply to post by trustnothing
 


Well, many people believe (and it is a pretty good theory) that it was a bait. I mean, how could a global intelligence company not encrypt their user-data? That is completely amateur and not something anyone would expect. So, perhaps they were idiots and allowed their precious data to get robbed from them. Or, perhaps AntiSec foolishly retrieved the information and created a catalyst to usher in SOPA. Maybe they were paid by the government to do this for SOPA. Or.. maybe they are actually the government. Who knows? Not I.
edit on 30-12-2011 by ErroneousDylan because: Look at this text... it is green and italic. How silly.


Law enforcement and security specialist will not practice what they preach as they are arrogant and probably didn't believe any hacker could ever get past their windows firewalls lol Anyway, this is a point that has been getting made since the beginning, none of these companies/organisations are taking any steps to encrypt client data. It would involve increased costs and they cant have that, not Sony, not Straford, not Mastercard. If client data is not worth the increased costs to protect, it will not be protected. It frankly is completely amateur and id bet many companies this week have discussed increasing security only to decide not now on a cost basis, tough times after all.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 04:48 AM
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In any case did they not steal 2.7 million emails? Lets see if the emails encourage the public to support SOPA though I have a feeling anything contained is likely to swing things the opposite way.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 04:49 AM
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Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by zeeon
 

Information just wants to be free!
Before everyone starts screaming "Oh Noes!" aren't we so often told "If you've nothing to hide, you've nothing to fear."?



I am sorry, I am having a hard time making out all of the detailed personal information you volunteered to go with this. I mean, what kind of person would type that from behind an internet mask?



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 04:55 AM
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As a counter-argument to the "they will censor the internet" crowd... that's not going to happen. Ever. They need the internet to be open 24/7 for commerce and they need the internet to collect your data ie "spy on you".

They won't turn it off, they won't censor it, they can't do it. The internet was designed with open architectures and survivability which is the optimum in network design.

If they really wanted to "turn it off" they'd have to drop EMP's across every major node in the world which would be an act of terrorism. It is also way beyond their logistical capabilities to do it.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 09:09 AM
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So help me understand....What's the average Joe blow going to do with all this info anyway?
It's not like everyone knows how to hack or even know what to do with other people's accounts.

Was this info just published for other simple hackers, to let them play around with numbers and test their abilities to hack?
I'm just not sure what the purpose of all this is for. Yes, It's impressive that they could find all this info, but it just shows how lacking security really is. I just hope it doesn't backfire on all of us.... so that we will all be considered terrorists.... unless we get a specific security mark stamped on our foreheads or something.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by blue_fish
Yes, It's impressive that they could find all this info, but it just shows how lacking security really is


That is the whole point, security is "not" really lacking in a firm like this. With the clients on this list, if the feds don't have them arrested in days, it is even further proof that a) anonymous is that good or b) it's all a big stage.

If we have two more of these types of attacks in the near future and nobody is caught, then my vote is definitely B without a doubt. If the drug cartel can catch one of anonymous your telling me the Feds can't catch this one? Only time will tell though. It's a lose/lose situation for the feds in the eyes of the conspiracy crowd, and should be in the public's eye too, but the sheep won't see the incompetence of the Feds the way we do if they aren't caught.
edit on 30-12-2011 by Awoken4Ever because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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check it out below - pretty neat

http:///QSX0XYiD

and here is the raw data they released
edit on 30-12-2011 by MrRottenTreats because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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oh dear. check this out

excerpt from an email

We have discovered that Care2.com servers were attacked,
resulting in a security breach. The hackers were able to
access login information for Care2 member accounts. Our
team has worked to secure Care2.com against this type of
attack from recurring.

/end

now why in the sam hill would someone hack care2.com? wikipedia even has a brief note about it on the bottom of care2's wiki entry

en.wikipedia.org...

and here is their official statement on their website
www.care2.com...

this is getting out of hand.
edit on 30-12-2011 by undo because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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Just a perspective, from a network security viewpoint:

I'll keep my opinions to myself, for the moment. I really don't think this will amount to much. It's probably some dog vs dog battle. The hype outweighs any relevant truths which would make me think this is something "major" to watch.

Too much hype and trial balloons to make me think otherwise.


edit on 30-12-2011 by trekwebmaster because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:03 PM
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People doing their deeds under the catch-all banner of Anonymous have done some crazy things in the past months..but this one takes the cake. Well, those saying they will be put to the test couldn't have said it better.

Stratfor is a place I've used myself for quite some time and it wasn't really on the wrong side of things. It wasn't the CIA by any means...but it did count among it's members the intelligence professionals of most nations around the world. So...The men who Anonymous would least like taking this all personally and making a crusade out of putting Anonymous down for good are exactly who they went after.

I still don't get the point. What was gained here?? Stratfor didn't produce any juicy intelligence, apparently, or Anonymous would be crowing about that instead of logins and passwords that were all invalidated almost immediately anyway. Why start a full blown world cyber war with the people BEST educated and trained to fight it....for what I simply can't see ANY real gain to at all?? It makes no sense....



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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I just can't wrap my brain around this. Something just does not add up.

I'm a free member of Stratfor, have been for about 3 or 4 years. Their intel reports are pretty non-biased and don't always jive with what US power brokers would want to have released or assessed.

I can't see how it benefits Anon to release the email info of insiders who are willing to give information to Stratfor, possibly even whistleblowers.

If anything, this reads more like a ruse to justify steeper internet controls.

ETA:

reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Yeah, what you said!

edit on 30/12/2011 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:14 PM
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HACK THE PLANET!!!



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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Originally posted by undo
oh dear. check this out

excerpt from an email

We have discovered that Care2.com servers were attacked,
resulting in a security breach. The hackers were able to
access login information for Care2 member accounts. Our
team has worked to secure Care2.com against this type of
attack from recurring.

/end

now why in the sam hill would someone hack care2.com? wikipedia even has a brief note about it on the bottom of care2's wiki entry

en.wikipedia.org...

and here is their official statement on their website
www.care2.com...

this is getting out of hand.
edit on 30-12-2011 by undo because: (no reason given)


Both a co-worker and I just got this email this morning!

Is this related to the hack? Jeez. I never even joined that site.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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Originally posted by Algernonsmouse

Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by zeeon
 

Information just wants to be free!
Before everyone starts screaming "Oh Noes!" aren't we so often told "If you've nothing to hide, you've nothing to fear."?



I am sorry, I am having a hard time making out all of the detailed personal information you volunteered to go with this. I mean, what kind of person would type that from behind an internet mask?


Maybe because it's possibly not the drama everyone thinks it is.
A credit card number is not much good for stealing I would think. Order something on the net and you will need an address to have it delivered to. In other words, traceable. A lot of places refuse to ship to PO boxes, possibly for this very reason. At worst people will have a little inconvenience while they get new credit cards. They will not lose money as this scenario is covered by the CC company. My CC has an extra 3 digit code on the back, plus I have a passphrase for extra security although not all sites ask for the passphrase yet.



posted on Dec, 30 2011 @ 02:32 PM
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Anonymous screwed up really bad this time. I used to subscribe to the Stratfor service. For those of you who don't know, it was basically a CNN for people who make military decisions. Stratfor wasn't waging war, they weren't overcharging customers, and they didn't have any real "damning" information like a blueprint for 9/11. It was basically just a news service. Some of their big customers however were part of the US Government. I'm not sure why Anonymous would do this. It would be like hacking into the financial database of New York Times subscribers. But now that they have targeted people who are true "professionals" you can expect a lot of collateral.




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