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AntiSec and Anonymous release 860,000 Accounts and 75,000 stolen Credit Cards from STRATFOR hack

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posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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AntiSec and Anonymous release 860,000 CC's & Accounts


Twitter Hashtag Source


#AntiSec™ (wtf? we hate copyright...)
> Can I haz candy?
> :3

Greetings Global Pirates! Having fun riding the waves of the Global Financial Meltdown? We sure are.

Did Bradley Manning get his fancy LulzXmas dinner yet?

hm... guess not.

Still trying to lock him up for life?
Still think we're just joking around?
That's OK. The time for talk is over.

So now let's talk... about cocks:
It's time to dump the full 75,000 names, addresses, CCs and md5 hashed passwords to every customer that has ever
(visit the link for the full news article)


edit on 29-12-2011 by zeeon because: (no reason given)


The external clip above is from their "announcement" on pastebin, but I will not link that here because it has links to the said illegal data, so the best I can do for now until Mass media picks up on this quote it.

Update 1: First news channel it pick it up confirming story - Source


edit on 29-12-2011 by zeeon because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-12-2011 by zeeon because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:15 PM
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This has just been released. I won't paste the links to the data, or the leaks, but I have seen it and it is real. None of the Mass Media has reported on this, as it has just gone down on twitter.

This is crazy! These guys really do mean business. They are saying they released the info because the US Government didn't "comply" with there demands to give Private Bradley Manning a full Xmas dinner. Wow.

The implications of this are pretty bad. Full CC info for THOUSANDS of government employees, including data from the CIA, FBI and Military.

Twitter
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 29-12-2011 by zeeon because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-12-2011 by zeeon because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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The implications of this are pretty bad. Full CC info for THOUSANDS of government employees, including data from the CIA, FBI and Military.


They attacked the U.S. government." Pretty bad" is an understatement.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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Wow!! Things are certainly heating up!!



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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Originally posted by TsukiLunar



The implications of this are pretty bad. Full CC info for THOUSANDS of government employees, including data from the CIA, FBI and Military.


They attacked the U.S. government." Pretty bad" is an understatement.



I have to agree. They have some pretty big balls. I think their techniques at staying anonymous are truly going to be tested after this release. I bet the feds are starting the scramble to contain the exposure of the release as we speak. I wonder what the fallout is going to be from all this. This has to be one of the largest government (well technically government / intelligence related) hacks / releases of all time.


+6 more 
posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by zeeon
 

Information just wants to be free!
Before everyone starts screaming "Oh Noes!" aren't we so often told "If you've nothing to hide, you've nothing to fear."?



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:28 PM
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reply to post by zeeon
 


This has the potential to open a can of worms for all of us. I'm not completely sure if that's a good thing, or a bad thing. I don't really see how leaking info about Credit Cards is going to do any good for "We the people"



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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Get ready.

The commercials for ID theft protection insurance will be on soon !



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by princeguy
reply to post by zeeon
 


This has the potential to open a can of worms for all of us. I'm not completely sure if that's a good thing, or a bad thing. I don't really see how leaking info about Credit Cards is going to do any good for "We the people"


Yeah the blowback from this could possibly enable SOPA and other legislature that would hinder us, not help us. I really hope that doesn't happen.

What really boggles the mind is how could Stratfor REALLY store all this info unencrypted and plaintext? Clearly they have ties to the military industrial complex and intelligence agencies! Maybe it was arrogance? One wonders if other agencies, and corporations are doing business this way as well!?



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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How the hell is anon helping *the people*
when they are posting
*the peoples* private information?

Seems like just casualties in this
cyber war..

I just do not see how this
is helping *the people*
it is exposing *the people*
who anon says they are standing up for.
All smoke and mirrors.

I could care less either way.
Don't use credit cards//
edit on 29-12-2011 by popsmayhem because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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Hilarious, another security think tank that couldn't provide the simplest level of security for itself. As I understand it, these were stored unencrypted on their server, which technically is a violation of Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), that requires all CC data to AT LEAST be encrypted.

Stratfor is another chicken little anyhow, too many errors and overstatements in their 'reports'.


Yeah the blowback from this could possibly enable SOPA and other legislature that would hinder us, not help us. I really hope that doesn't happen


I can understand the concern, but SOPA or PIPA would not prevent hacking attacks in any way - they're only useful for stealing domain names away from their registrants. Groups like Anon, lulzsec, et. al. would be just as happy on TOR than the Web.
edit on 29-12-2011 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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Originally posted by zeeon

What really boggles the mind is how could Stratfor REALLY store all this info unencrypted and plaintext? Clearly they have ties to the military industrial complex and intelligence agencies! Maybe it was arrogance? One wonders if other agencies, and corporations are doing business this way as well!?


Could you please explain this for us uneducated folk, I don't understand any of it.
I'm not trying to be rude, its just over my head.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:38 PM
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WHOOT! This is HUGE!!!

Should have released this b4 Xmas...would have helped Xmas trade! heh heh

Wonder when the media will report it?



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:40 PM
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Okay. I saw on there a list of leaked e-mail addresses and their passwords. One person's account password was "password". Now, that is just asking to get hacked. Rofl.

I am pretty impressed by this. Look at all those CC#s and company names..



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:41 PM
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It looks like SOPA will pass with flying colors......



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by princeguy
 

Unencrypted basically means that in some file on that server it reads
John Smith, 42 Buckingham Palace Road, London
instead of
ASD!@#2343, SDFWER WER!!@#%(*&(*&(*&(FSD,DASDKASDX

Hope it helps. And to decrypt you need a password.

ETA And if that's not entirely clear, it is meant to prevent someone stealing your data even when they possibly steal your hardware. Even if I have your files, when encrypted they are useless without the correct password.

edit on 29/12/11 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:44 PM
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Wow I didn't know Anonymous was still doing this kind of scary that they are especially if you become a target of them. I do wonder what will come of it though since they did this to the military.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:45 PM
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Originally posted by princeguy

Originally posted by zeeon

What really boggles the mind is how could Stratfor REALLY store all this info unencrypted and plaintext? Clearly they have ties to the military industrial complex and intelligence agencies! Maybe it was arrogance? One wonders if other agencies, and corporations are doing business this way as well!?


Could you please explain this for us uneducated folk, I don't understand any of it.
I'm not trying to be rude, its just over my head.


Sure, like the poster above me said, it means coding data that is naturally readable by human beings into something unreadable. What you are reading now is considered "plain text", where as if I apply encryption it, it becomes unreadable without the secret key. Typically, you want to do this with sensitive data like contact info, credit card numbers, etc. What is shocking is that they DIDN'T encrypt their data, and left it clear and readable.
edit on 29-12-2011 by zeeon because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:45 PM
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Well Rasputin would be happy with a cinnamon girl.



posted on Dec, 29 2011 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


As I understand things like TOR would come under the purview of SOPA because it could be used for illicit activities. I think that's the premise behind the uproar of SOPA / PIPA etc.



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