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BREAKING NEWS: Mandatory Evacuation In New Jersey

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posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 06:05 AM
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Not that I think this storm will top 1 story houses, but those of you in low lying areas that are refusing to leave ought to have an axe in the attic. It's a safety precaution.




posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 06:25 AM
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Originally posted by wingsfan
if mtv don't cancel jersey shore, god will.




That has to be the most stars gained by a reply I've ever seen.

Everyone hates that show.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 06:41 AM
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Little more info on Ocean City mandatory evacuation here


As a result of the projected path of Hurricane Irene, a mandatory evacuation has been ordered for Ocean City and the entire County of Cape May. You are encouraged to make final preparations, secure your property and leave Ocean City as soon as possible, but no later than Friday evening. If you have exhausted all options for obtaining transportation and lodging assistance from friends or family, please call 609-399-6111 during normal business hours on Friday. Check local television Channel 2 on the Comcast cable system or ocnj.us for continual updates as well as other information.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:06 AM
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reply to post by rogerstigers
 


edit on 26-8-2011 by wutz4tom because: correction



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by rogerstigers

Originally posted by topdog30
I would hope people would have enough common sense to make a decision and leave on their own. I don’t understand why people would have to wait to be told to evacuate.



Side effect of our economy and social construct.. If a person evacuates instead of showing up for work and nothing happens, they get fired. If they evacuate because the "officials" told them to, they are ok.
unless they are a Fed./State employee classified as Essential...



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:19 AM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere

Originally posted by Enlightenme1111
Irene is predicted to be a weak category 1 hurricane by the time it gets there. Why is this necessary?


Yet every Winter when we know with absolute certainty that a foot and a half of snow will fall onto a solid inch of ice nobody does anything at all to prepare and they die trying to heat their powerless homes with charcoal grills in the living room.


OMG!...Do they Really do that? Heat thier homes that way?



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:22 AM
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you had bette get out now...go ahead and give your homes to the thugs and looters...you dont have any guns or supplies to defend and support yourself with anyway...liberal utopia



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:25 AM
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Aw man, I am so sick and tired of media driven panic.
In the Boston area we always prepare for the worst hurricane or worst nor'easter EVER! Then we get some rain and wind or maybe a foot and a half of snow (if we're lucky). Seriously...



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:46 AM
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I bet it peters out by the time it hits the Carolina's....


I will be replenishing my water & toilet paper supply's just in case it doesn't...


I remember one[hurricane] some time back
screwed up the water supply for a couple a days here in Northern Va...


oh and a couple cases of beer.... almost forgot



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:47 AM
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Thanks for let us know, I am in NJ and preparing family fir an unusual weekend. Yesterday filled up the minivan gas tank, today we will hit that ATM really hard.

I am close to Branch Brook Park, so when it's over I'll try to grab the camera an make some shots if trees are down.

Good luck everybody !



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by Flying Sorcerer
 


Looks like the SHTF scenario.... if its not EQ's its Hurricanes.... and it looks like Irene is angry!!

Get your butts out of there and don't board yourself up in a wooden house as i've seen many times the house just get picked up and thrown around....



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:53 AM
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Originally posted by Trueman
Thanks for let us know, I am in NJ and preparing family fir an unusual weekend. Yesterday filled up the minivan gas tank, today we will hit that ATM really hard.

I am close to Branch Brook Park, so when it's over I'll try to grab the camera an make some shots if trees are down.

Good luck everybody !


Keep yourself and your family safe mate, not worth running the risk of hoping it will amount to nothing.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by spoonbender
I bet it peters out by the time it hits the Carolina's....


I will be replenishing my water & toilet paper supply's just in case it doesn't...


I remember one[hurricane] some time back
screwed up the water supply for a couple a days here in Northern Va...


oh and a couple cases of beer.... almost forgot


And don't forget to run to the grocery store to stock up on bread and milk. That way when the power goes out it can sit there and go bad...



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:05 AM
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For those of you taking the storm lightly, it is better to be safe than sorry. If you are ordered to evacuate and nothing more than a gust of wind happens, be thankful return home and clean up. If the worst case scenario happens, and you're still there, then I really do not know what to say. Hurricanes are powerful and very unpredictable, do not be fooled by Category 1, 2 etc.. etc... the conditions behind the hurricane, or even a tropical storm are what makes them deadly.

Dr. Jeff Masters, a well-respected and experienced meteorologist from Wunderground.com, has a blog that illustrates the clear and present danger very well. I have been reading his blog now for about 7 years and he's not a "fear monger", or one to overract and he knows what he's talking about.

Irene an extremely dangerous storm surge threat to the mid-Atlantic and New England


Today, we have a hurricane over the Bahamas--Hurricane Irene--that threatens to be the Northeast's most dangerous storm since the 1938 hurricane. We've all been watching the computer models, which have been steadily moving their forecast tracks for Irene more to the east--first into Florida, then Georgia, then South Carolina, then North Carolina, then offshore of North Carolina--and it seemed that this storm would do what so many many storms have done in the past, brush the Outer Banks of North Carolina, then head out to sea. Irene will not do that. Irene will likely hit Eastern North Carolina, but the storm is going northwards after that, and may deliver an extremely destructive blow to the mid-Atlantic and New England states. I am most concerned about the storm surge danger to North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and the rest of the New England coast. Irene is capable of inundating portions of the coast under 10 - 15 feet of water, to the highest storm surge depths ever recorded. I strongly recommend that all residents of the mid-Atlantic and New England coast familiarize themselves with their storm surge risk.



The threat to the coasts of New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine is less certain, but evacuations may be ordered in those states, as well. Irene is an extremely dangerous storm for an area that has no experience with hurricanes, and I strongly urge you to evacuate from the coast if an evacuation is ordered by local officials. My area of greatest concern is the coast from Ocean City, Maryland, to Atlantic City, New Jersey. It is possible that this stretch of coast will receive a direct hit from a slow-moving Category 2 hurricane hitting during the highest tide of the month, bringing a 10 - 15 foot storm surge.



Irene's large size, slow motion, arrival at high tide, and Category 3 strength at landfall in North Carolina will likely drive a storm surge of 8 - 10 feet into the heads of bays in Pamlico Sound, and 3 - 6 feet in Albemarle Sound. As the storm progresses northwards, potential storm surge heights grow due to the shape of the coast and depth of the ocean, though the storm will be weakening. If Irene is a Category 1 storm as it crosses into Virginia, it can send a storm surge of 4 - 8 feet into Chesapeake Bay and Norfolk. I give a 50% chance that the surge from Irene in those locations will exceed the record surges observed in 2003 during Hurricane Isabel. The region I am most concerned about, though, is the stretch of coast running from southern Maryland to Central New Jersey, including Delaware and the cities of Ocean City and Atlantic City. A Category 1 hurricane can bring a storm surge of 5 - 9 feet here. Irene's large size, slow movement, and arrival at the highest tide of the month could easily bring a surge one Category higher than the storm's winds might suggest, resulting in a Category 2 type inundation along the coast, near 10 - 15 feet. This portion of the coast has no hurricane experience, and loss of life could be heavy if evacuation orders are not heeded. I give a 30% chance that the storm surge from Irene will bring water depths in excess of 10 feet to the coasts of Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey.







However, the highest storm surge on record in New York City occurred during the September 3, 1821 hurricane, the only hurricane ever to make a direct hit on the city. The water rose 13 feet in just one hour at the Battery, and flooded lower Manhattan as far north as Canal Street, an area that now has the nation's financial center. The total surge is unknown from this greatest New York City hurricane, which was probably a Category 2 storm with 110 mph winds. NOAA's SLOSH model predicts that a mid-strength Category 2 hurricane with 100-mph winds could drive a 15 - 20 foot storm surge to Manhattan, Queens, Kings, and up the Hudson River. JFK airport could be swamped, southern Manhattan would flood north to Canal Street, and a surge traveling westwards down Long Island Sound might breach the sea walls that protect La Guardia Airport. Many of the power plants that supply the city with electricity might be knocked out, or their docks to supply them with fuel destroyed. The more likely case of a Category 1 hurricane hitting at high tide would still be plenty dangerous, with waters reaching 8 - 12 feet above ground level in Lower Manhattan. Given the spread in the models, I predict a 20% chance that New York City will experience a storm surge in excess of 8 feet that will over-top the flood walls in Manhattan and flood the subway system. This would most likely occur near 8 pm Sunday night, when high tide will occur and Irene should be near its point of closest approach. Such a storm surge could occur even if Irene weakens to a tropical storm on its closest approach to New York City.





The entire New England coast is at high danger of receiving its highest storm surge in the past 50 years from Irene, though the exact locations of most danger remain unclear. If North Carolina takes a bullet for us and reduces Irene below hurricane strength before the storm reaches New England, the surge will probably not cause major destruction. But if Irene misses North Carolina and arrives along the New England coast as a hurricane, the storm surge is likely to cause significant damage. I urge everyone along the coast to familiarize themselves with their storm surge risk and be prepared to evacuate should an evacuation order be issued.


There you have it. Be prepared and don't take any silly unnecessary risks.

ETA: Here is the URL for the latest blog and information from Dr. Masters and team.

www.wunderground.com...
edit on 26-8-2011 by majesticgent because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:06 AM
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Ouch. It looks like Virginia Beach and surrounding areas will be taking a direct CAT 3 hit from this one.

My mother and dad were camping down at Indian River, DE this week, she txtd last night that the park rangers were telling everyone they had to be out by 3pm today, they left last night around 8:30 or so.

Seems this one is really going to screw up the Chesapeake Bay ... just when it was finally getting back to where/what it was before the last one blew through.


batton down the hatches, those of you in the path of Irene. Stay safe and Be well.


My younger brother lives just outside of Ocean City [Willards, MD] and I've yet to get a hold of him to find out what their plans are.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by spikey
 
Last night was pretty stormy here in Daytona. Lots of rain and some pretty strong gusts.
That's passed us now, so the weather forcast is looking good here, due to the storm having already gone on it's way to the north.



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:25 AM
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To reiterate the point a Hurricane Warning has been issued!!!

More details:


HURRICANE WARNINGS: N. CAROLINA TO NEW JERSEY
Dire warnings are being issue in advance of Hurricane Irene. It will affect North Carolina tonight before moving to the Northeast with EXTRAORDINARY impacts expected.


www.weather.com...

If you live in or around the hurricane warned area and you're reading this, act now!!! Get your belongings make arrangements to move further inland. Do what you can to protect your house and then hastily go inland. Do not wait until tomorrow because the traffic will be insane and you might get caught stuck in the middle of the storm. I was involved in the largest peacetime evacuation in the US from Hurricane Floyd, but I have a feeling this one will trump it.

chps.sam.usace.army.mil...

Let me tell you. Traffic was horrible! Thankfully I had family further inland, those without anywhere to go had to stay in shelters, high school gyms, gracious people extending their homes, and wherever they could because all of the hotels were sold out in five or more states! Don't count on being able to get a hotel. Last thing you want is to be stuck in tropical storm force winds sitting in a car because you waited too late to evacuate!!!

If you live in the hurricane watch area be prepared to leave at a moments notice if the watch should change to a warning.

Be safe out there everyone.
edit on 26-8-2011 by majesticgent because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:37 AM
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reply to post by majesticgent
 


Superb contribution to the thread - thank you very much!

I can't believe that so many are taking the opinion of "it's only a cat 3 at best" - look at all the information provided and not just the category as there are other factors that are making this so dangerous.

As many have said - better to evacuate and still have a house to go back to rather than not evacuating and being trapped in a really dangerous situation

Stay safe people - do what you can to secure your homes (take everything upstairs for starters as the floods look to be devastating) and then get yourself to safer ground



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:37 AM
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Originally posted by 12m8keall2c
Ouch. It looks like Virginia Beach and surrounding areas will be taking a direct CAT 3 hit from this one.

My mother and dad were camping down at Indian River, DE this week, she txtd last night that the park rangers were telling everyone they had to be out by 3pm today, they left last night around 8:30 or so.

Seems this one is really going to screw up the Chesapeake Bay ... just when it was finally getting back to where/what it was before the last one blew through.


batton down the hatches, those of you in the path of Irene. Stay safe and Be well.


My younger brother lives just outside of Ocean City [Willards, MD] and I've yet to get a hold of him to find out what their plans are.

Im from this area in which you speak. We had a super strong storm last night..Unlike any Ive seen ...further than I can remember. Lightening and thunder almost back to back for more than an hour.within a couple seconds of each other.Wind and rain just off the hook.Then it all just stopped completely.Now we wait for Irene. im 30 minutes off the water.
Be Safe Folks.....Dont give in to the temptataions to not prepare hoping this monster will just peter out..



posted on Aug, 26 2011 @ 08:44 AM
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By the time it gets up there, it likely won't be much of a threatening storm (maybe Cat 1). Cat 1's and 2's aren't typically much worse than nasty thunderstorms for the majority of the impacted area. Still, for those who do actually experience the hurricane force winds, no fun. Tornadoes are another danger.

Of course, most of us already practice a mandatory evacuation of New Jersey...by not living there!


Sorry, I just have issues with that state (as do most people who have ever driven through it)....



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