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is the sun cold?

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posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 07:47 AM
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I have read that the sun is black and cold. Check out Living Energies - Viktor Schauberger its a brilliant book written by Callum Coats




posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 07:49 AM
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Following along the same logical lines as the OP...

Why does the universe go dark for 1/10th of a second, every few seconds? It's really weird - does anyone else experience this??

There! It happened again.. And there.

It's so wierd. Seems to coincide with the blinking of my eyes so I can't see what's happening... There MUST be some logical explanation to this incredible phenomena..

Whoa - and there again! Are you guys getting this too?
edit on 28-4-2011 by noonebutme because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 07:53 AM
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The fact that the night (when there is no sun in the sky) is colder than the day (when there is a sun in the sky) is a good give away that the sun is hot.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by coolottie
 


So I guess a blue flame is cold too?

Why don't you put your hand in one and find out.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by -PLB-
The fact that the night (when there is no sun in the sky) is colder than the day (when there is a sun in the sky) is a good give away that the sun is hot.


so thats their trick, they leave for the moon only at night,
now i get it. They leave when the sun sleeps.

thank you for your knowledge on this.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


Who are 'they'?

This thread is really confusing, I'm having a hard time trying to understand whether you are all being incredibly sarcastic, or if you actually believe that the Sun is cold.
edit on 28/4/2011 by splittheatom because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 09:39 AM
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Originally posted by splittheatom
reply to post by mkkkay
 


Who are 'they'?

This thread is really confusing, I'm having a hard time trying to understand whether you are all being incredibly sarcastic, or if you actually believe that the Sun is cold.
edit on 28/4/2011 by splittheatom because: (no reason given)


Sorry! THEY. would be nasa or any one who goes in space.... What do you believe...



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


I believe what I have been taught and what I have discovered for myself.

I am both a physics and chemistry student, so I have a good understanding on chemical reactions.

If you are to believe that the Sun does undergo nuclear fusion, that is, where the nuclei of atoms join, releasing energy, then it would be very clear why the Sun is in fact hot.

The sun releases electromagnetic waves which carry this energy, and these can be observed by anyone, not just by scientists.

Light is absorbed, particles get 'excited', move around a bit and create heat. Microwaves do the same thing, they cause water molecules to rotate, creating heat energy.

And surprise surprise the Sun emits light and microwaves.

Go and do a little experiment. Turn on a torch, and leave it on for 5 minutes. Put your hand on the end where the light comes out and you will see that it is hot.

Now when you can provide a theory backed by hard evidence that the Sun is cold, I might listen.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 10:08 AM
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Originally posted by mkkkay
"The higher we go the colder it gets,


Appreciate you're quoting someone else there, but this is totally wrong.

It does get colder for a time - until you pass through the tropopause which is around 10km above the Earth's surface (though it varies in altitude according to where you are and the time of year). After that, it starts getting warmer again ......



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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I must say I only looked at this thread because of how ridiculous it sounded and I couldn't believe somebody was asking such a stupid question. But I took the time to read the link given in the OP and now it's got me thinking. I'm not saying I believe the sun is cold now, but I try to remain as open-minded as possible and there is some food for thought there, including the information about how hard it is for us to recreate space plasmas for experimentation. A lot of the 'OMG you're talking nonsense' responses are relying on reasoning that is called into question by the link.

As far as I understand it spectral analysis measures light, not heat; heat levels are merely inferred from that. And if it's so obvious that the sun is hot because it's orange, how come when I touch my LCD panel on the orange picture of the sun it doesn't feel any warmer than the black page surrounding it? How come oranges aren't warmer than blackberries? (Please don't answer these questions I know how LCD displays work and understand at least the basics of how we see colours.)

Don't get me wrong, I'm far from convinced on this, just saying that I found the ideas raised in the link interesting, and that so far they aren't being countered here - of course that doesn't mean that they won't be countered soon so I'll continue reading!

Thanks for an interesting topic OP



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by morkington
Don't get me wrong, I'm far from convinced on this, just saying that I found the ideas raised in the link interesting, and that so far they aren't being countered here - of course that doesn't mean that they won't be countered soon so I'll continue reading!


Maybe you can do a little experiment yourself. On a sunny day, expose yourself to the sun for some time, after that block the path to the sun for some time (go in the shade). Now determine which was hotter. A more scientific experiment, place an object in the sun and place another (similar) object in the shadow, and measure its temperature.

Anyway, I think a 3 year old knows the answers. Not sure what this thread is really about to be honest.
edit on 28-4-2011 by -PLB- because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by -PLB-
 


Sure but the OP doesn't ask if the sun heats up things on earth, it asks if the sun is hot. These are two different questions, for comparison my microwave oven isn't hot but it heats things up.

Anyway as I say I'm not convinced, I just found the question interesting.



posted on May, 2 2011 @ 09:07 AM
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Originally posted by morkington
reply to post by -PLB-
 


Sure but the OP doesn't ask if the sun heats up things on earth, it asks if the sun is hot. These are two different questions, for comparison my microwave oven isn't hot but it heats things up.

Anyway as I say I'm not convinced, I just found the question interesting.


we can get burns from cold,
we can get burns from salt,
spices burn, don't make them hot.
and yes microwaves.. good call.



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