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is the sun cold?

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posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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"The higher we go the colder it gets, so we see even by logic that heat and light do not come from the Sun. Only lines of force come from the great Sun body."

The first body is the Sun (acting as a nucleus). Over one hundred years ago, in 1854 [sic] (2), the eminent astronomer Sir William Herschel suggested that the Sun may be inhabited and that the inhabitants may no more suffer from the intense heat than those who live in the tropical regions of Earth! He believed the Sun to be cool body, not a hot, flaming gas ball.

The Rosicrucian Order, AMORC, that is based on Ancient Wisdom, teaches that the sun's rays are neither hot nor cold and that it is during the interaction of the rays with a material object that heat is produced. Also that the sun's rays mixed with the magnetism of our Earth produce heat around us. This information was extracted by the author from a Rosicrucian monograph of a higher degree.

As actual proof, the outer space exposed to sun rays without any blockage from atmosphere is really extremely cold to approximately 3 oK (-273 oC), water freezes approximately at 4 oC. Why is it not then extremely hot, since when sun is resplendent, in summer for instance, and there are no clouds is hot outdoors? Heat is caused by a thermal reaction between sun rays and the electromagnetic planetary aura, the Van Allen lines or the morphogenetic fields of matter as taught in ancient arcane wisdom.

In a sense it is understandable to conclude that the Sun is hot since is the source of energy for our planet and when rises in the East the temperature of the Earth surface exposed to the Sun increases as a result of receiving the sun rays and cools off as the sun sets in the West. Also if we are close to a furnace we feel the heat and the colors of fire look like the colors of the sun. This drives to the obvious and logical conclusion that the sun is hot like a caldera. Ironically, by thinking in this mode, by empirical observation, people of the past believed that Earth was flat or created the concept of a geocentric universe. But what looks obvious may not be so.

www.luisprada.com...

What say you! is the sun cold...




posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by mkkkay
"The higher we go the colder it gets, so we see even by logic that heat and light do not come from the Sun. Only lines of force come from the great Sun body."


Ummm.. Nooooo!

Temp of the Moon

The temperature on the moon varies from -387 Fahrenheit (-233 Celsius), at night, to 253 Fahrenheit (123 Celsius) during the day. Because the moon has no atmosphere to block some of the sun's rays or to help trap heat at night, its temperature varies greatly between day and night.

For the Kids


Temp of the Sun

The Sun's stellar classification, based on spectral class, is G2V, and is informally designated as a yellow dwarf, because its visible radiation is most intense in the yellow-green portion of the spectrum and although its color is white, from the surface of the Earth it may appear yellow because of atmospheric scattering of blue light.[14][15] In the spectral class label, G2 indicates its surface temperature of approximately 5778 K (5505 °C)

Linky


IRM



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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It only gets colder as we go higher because we are leaving our atmosphere, which is what keeps the heat from the sun in...you wont experience any warmth in space.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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So it's similar to "If a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?"

The sun isn't hot unless you're there as matter to experience it?



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:39 PM
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Yes, the sun is cold. Very cold...



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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"All the three-brained beings of that planet who have reached responsible age, under the influence of the many and various wiseacrings they call 'sciences,' are without exception categorically convinced that these phenomena [daylight, darkness, heat, and cold] arrive on their planet completely ready-made, as it were, directly from their own sun..."

The above quote is from a chapter titled "The Arch-Absurd: According to the assertion of Beelzebub, our Sun Neither Lights nor Heats." The book is Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson: An Objectively Impartial Criticism of the Life of Man. It may be of interest to you.

My personal take on this assertion is that it is a means to challenge our automatically accepted world-views. Who ever thinks to question that the sun doesn't bring light and heat to our planet? It's just accepted that that is the way it is and it couldn't possibly be otherwise. It's good to question things and verify them for ourselves, by ourselves.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by ReVoLuTiOn76
It only gets colder as we go higher because we are leaving our atmosphere, which is what keeps the heat from the sun in...you wont experience any warmth in space.


Is that even if we go near the sun, if we hade wings could we get to the sun or would it be to hot?



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


No offense.. But are you high right now?



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by snowen20
reply to post by mkkkay
 


No offense.. But are you high right now?


none taken! i just think that what we know of the nature of the sun is not what we are told, how can it be dark and
cold in space, the more we get high



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:06 PM
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Originally posted by mkkkay

Originally posted by ReVoLuTiOn76
It only gets colder as we go higher because we are leaving our atmosphere, which is what keeps the heat from the sun in...you wont experience any warmth in space.


Is that even if we go near the sun, if we hade wings could we get to the sun or would it be to hot?


Nope you'd never be able to break free of the atmosphere. That's why there are no birds in space.

IRM



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


If you are in space, and you are facing the sun you are hot, while the opposite side is cold.
I do not see the contradiction in logic here.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:13 PM
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I have one. Why is our solar system dark?



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


I think the problem your having is that you fail to understand that space is a vacuum, there is no convection for heat because there is no air. That being said, it is the exact reason why space is still relevantly cold even in the habitable zone of a star.

So, as another person said, if you were in space right above earth and facing the sun, you would literally be fried on one side and frozen solid on the other.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:26 PM
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Cold? Yes it is. But only at night.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:27 PM
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Originally posted by Helious
reply to post by mkkkay
 


I think the problem your having is that you fail to understand that space is a vacuum, there is no convection for heat because there is no air. That being said, it is the exact reason why space is still relevantly cold even in the habitable zone of a star.

So, as another person said, if you were in space right above earth and facing the sun, you would literally be fried on one side and frozen solid on the other.


is that why they leave for the moon only at night


it's fun to see all the diffrent ideas from members, who have diffrent views on this.
edit on 25-4-2011 by mkkkay because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by thorazineshuffle
I have one. Why is our solar system dark?


Because our pupils is the exact same substance matter as it, therefore our eyes cancel it out as "unseeable". Hence dark


Just my own opinion...Science my have something different to say, they'll make it more scientific and difficult to understand



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


Here is a thread I did on a Star almost room temp... Good question.

Dubbed CFBDSIR 1458 10b, the star is what's called a brown dwarf. These oddball objects are often called failed stars, because they have starlike heat and chemical properties but don't have enough mass for the crush of gravity to ignite nuclear fusion at their cores.

With surface temperatures hovering around 206 degrees F (97 degrees C), the newfound star is the coldest brown dwarf seen to date. (Related: "Dimmest Stars in Universe Spotted?")


www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 4/25/11 by Ophiuchus 13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


"The Sun Is Cold"

Is that why the closer a planet is to the sun, The colder they seem to be?

I hear Mercury would be like living in the deepest most isolated places in space itself. Bring an anorak or two!



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 02:38 PM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 
I say you are absolutely Right. I just brought this up the other day on a thread. When you focus your eyes in a certain way you can see the Sun without any glare coming off of it at all. It is Blue, a beautiful Royal Blue. We have been told a lot of falsehoods about the sun, moon and planets around us. Very good thread,SF



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 02:41 PM
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It's cold like hell ^^



add.
hmm, but it's really not a dumb question. Take light, light is not bright, only the reflection of light is bright. And the space is cold, the radiation of the sun can not heat space without atmosphere. The Energy has to reflect to give it's energy to a body. Hmm, good brain op!

edit on 25-4-2011 by cushycrux because: (no reason given)



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