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is the sun cold?

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posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by coolottie
 


I don't think the sun is cold, but I think it is electrical in nature.

The electricity coming off of it illuminate our atmosphere, giving the blue hue to our atmosphere, like a neon will light up when electricity passes through the intern atmosphere.

The fact you could see it blue is, I would guess, the same effect that makes you see a far away mountain blue, or the Moon in grey...




posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by snowen20
reply to post by mkkkay
 


If you are in space, and you are facing the sun you are hot, while the opposite side is cold.
I do not see the contradiction in logic here.



I see where the OP is coming from. It's actually something I've never considered before, and makes the thread worthwhile. The space directly around the sun, anything that isn't the sun it's self, is freezing cold. The sun doesn't heat up the vacuum of space, and the only way the sun will be perceived as 'hot' is if there is physical matter absorbing the electromagnetic rays coming off of it. The actual heat from the sun isn't what is warming the matter up, so therefore, it doesn't really even matter that the sun is hot... it's sort of irrelevant.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 


Actually....


The sky is blue because of something called "Rayleigh scattering..


The blue color of the sky is due to Rayleigh scattering. As light moves through the atmosphere, most of the longer wavelengths pass straight through. Little of the red, orange and yellow light is affected by the air.

However, much of the shorter wavelength light is absorbed by the gas molecules. The absorbed blue light is then radiated in different directions. It gets scattered all around the sky. Whichever direction you look, some of this scattered blue light reaches you. Since you see the blue light from everywhere overhead, the sky looks blue.


source



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 03:50 PM
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Originally posted by thorazineshuffle
I have one. Why is our solar system dark?




Can light only be seen when it is reflected off particles? Is space dark because it is a vacuum and there are no particles for a light wave to reflect off of? How is it possible for light to travel through a vacuum? I am also puzzled whether light is emitted by photons, waves, or both?


The Answer
What an interesting set of questions. I'm going to explain light in terms of the visible spectrum and our eyes (our sensors of light), but it holds true for the entire electro-magnetic (em) spectrum.
Your eye has specialized cells (rods and cones) that detect the intensity (brightness) and color of visible light photons. When one of these photons enters your eye, these cells convert its energy into a nerve signal that registers in your brain.

So to see an object it must either:

1) Emit photons towards your eye;
(the Sun, a candle flame, a light bulb, a TV).

2) Deflect photons towards your eye;
(the Moon, a dog, a plant, a telephone).

As to the reason space is dark, you're right! It's because there is a vacuum in space, and no particles to reflect the Sun's light from space and into our eyes.

In respect to how light travels in a vacuum, I recommend that you check out Imagine the Universe! at:

imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov... which explains how light moves, and has a link to a definition of the particle/wave duality of light:



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by mkkkay

Originally posted by thorazineshuffle
I have one. Why is our solar system dark?




Can light only be seen when it is reflected off particles? Is space dark because it is a vacuum and there are no particles for a light wave to reflect off of? How is it possible for light to travel through a vacuum? I am also puzzled whether light is emitted by photons, waves, or both?


The Answer
What an interesting set of questions. I'm going to explain light in terms of the visible spectrum and our eyes (our sensors of light), but it holds true for the entire electro-magnetic (em) spectrum.
Your eye has specialized cells (rods and cones) that detect the intensity (brightness) and color of visible light photons. When one of these photons enters your eye, these cells convert its energy into a nerve signal that registers in your brain.

So to see an object it must either:

1) Emit photons towards your eye;
(the Sun, a candle flame, a light bulb, a TV).

2) Deflect photons towards your eye;
(the Moon, a dog, a plant, a telephone).

As to the reason space is dark, you're right! It's because there is a vacuum in space, and no particles to reflect the Sun's light from space and into our eyes.

In respect to how light travels in a vacuum, I recommend that you check out Imagine the Universe! at:

imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov... which explains how light moves, and has a link to a definition of the particle/wave duality of light:



Light can travel very good true vacuum, but it's particle and wave, dependent "if" someone is watching or not (quantum physics).



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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Damn it mkkkay, your twisted logic and what I thought was a drug induced reasoning has confounded me!
Now I am curious. Another poster here pointed out something that I was going to say in my post but didn't.

The reason being is that I didn't have a real way of countering the argument that would naturally arise, leaving me without ammo to fight. Well, I yield to this truth, that I am definitely intrigued now.

Amazing how you think you know something and a simple question trips you all up huh?
Star and flag because you got me!



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by snowen20
Damn it mkkkay, your twisted logic and what I thought was a drug induced reasoning has confounded me!
Now I am curious. Another poster here pointed out something that I was going to say in my post but didn't.

The reason being is that I didn't have a real way of countering the argument that would naturally arise, leaving me without ammo to fight. Well, I yield to this truth, that I am definitely intrigued now.

Amazing how you think you know something and a simple question trips you all up huh?
Star and flag because you got me!


Balls of con fusion! thats what the world is today...
thanks for you star and flag but your mind change was enough

now you know.. that one question leeds to another

if you think of something else com back and share



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 11:04 PM
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And of course it is't true even on earth that the higher you go the colder it gets.

The temperature decreases with altitude through the troposhere - that part of the atmosphere closest to earth and varying in thickness from about 8km to 15km depending who you read, how close to the equator/poles, how you hold you G&T, etc.

Above that temperature INCREASES - the highest reaches of the stratosphere get up to almost 0 deg C at about 50km.

then in the Mesosphere temperatures decrease again, and above that in the Thermosphere it gets back up to perhaps 2500 deg C - and this is where the ISS orbits!!

Of course there's so little gas at this altitude that you'd still freeze to death if you could breathe...but what little gas there is get freakin' hot in daytime!

Above the thermosphere is the exosphere - a fairly ill defined region which is almsot a vacuum...but not quite.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 11:15 PM
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Originally posted by mkkkay

Originally posted by Helious
reply to post by mkkkay
 


I think the problem your having is that you fail to understand that space is a vacuum, there is no convection for heat because there is no air. That being said, it is the exact reason why space is still relevantly cold even in the habitable zone of a star.

So, as another person said, if you were in space right above earth and facing the sun, you would literally be fried on one side and frozen solid on the other.


is that why they leave for the moon only at night


it's fun to see all the diffrent ideas from members, who have diffrent views on this.
edit on 25-4-2011 by mkkkay because: (no reason given)


I am most definitely on the other side of the fence as far as main stream thinking goes! Hell, I believe the moon was manipulated into earth orbit, I also believe either aliens or ancient earth races inhabit the moon and mars. That being said, I can pretty much assure you that the sun is in fact........ Hot.

The sun produces energy from nuclear fusion. Nuclear fusion produces an incredible amount of heat! An object as large as the Sun, as dynamic and truth be told, ageless as far has humans are concerned produces heat on a scale that we as individuals have a hard time comprehending because we do not experience anything close to these temperatures in everyday life.

When people in the Australian outback are complaining because it is 115 degrees, it is kind of hard for humans to imagine 5500F. Rest assured, the sun is hot, it's very very hot. I can see were your coming from and it's an interesting thought but, it is just not possible the sun is cold, no way that fact could be hidden.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by cushycrux
It's cold like hell ^^



add.
hmm, but it's really not a dumb question. Take light, light is not bright, only the reflection of light is bright. And the space is cold, the radiation of the sun can not heat space without atmosphere. The Energy has to reflect to give it's energy to a body. Hmm, good brain op!

edit on 25-4-2011 by cushycrux because: (no reason given)


Excellent observation and something I had not thought about before exactly. This is the reason ATS is a great place and even topics you would not consider to be cutting edge can not only inform but excite and entertain the mind!



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 11:23 PM
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I have lots of reasons why the sun is hot, not cold.

The sun is orange, and orange things are hot.
In Greek myths if people went too close to the sun on their chariot they would burn.
The sun uses nuclear fission to produce energy which emits heat.

Hmm. I failed to convince myself against your argument that the sun is hot, not cold. Now I just don't know.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 11:24 PM
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Originally posted by Aloysius the Gaul
And of course it is't true even on earth that the higher you go the colder it gets.

The temperature decreases with altitude through the troposhere - that part of the atmosphere closest to earth and varying in thickness from about 8km to 15km depending who you read, how close to the equator/poles, how you hold you G&T, etc.

Above that temperature INCREASES - the highest reaches of the stratosphere get up to almost 0 deg C at about 50km.

then in the Mesosphere temperatures decrease again, and above that in the Thermosphere it gets back up to perhaps 2500 deg C - and this is where the ISS orbits!!

Of course there's so little gas at this altitude that you'd still freeze to death if you could breathe...but what little gas there is get freakin' hot in daytime!

Above the thermosphere is the exosphere - a fairly ill defined region which is almsot a vacuum...but not quite.


This is mostly correct. We are getting into thermal dynamics here and it is a complicated science but one thing that is for sure, you can not have thermal dynamics without an atmosphere. Space is a vacuum and does not contain air and so is true there can be no thermal dynamics which leaves things that happen on earth decidedly different than things that happen in space.



posted on Apr, 25 2011 @ 11:25 PM
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Originally posted by Wang Tang
I have lots of reasons why the sun is hot, not cold.

The sun is orange, and orange things are hot.
In Greek myths if people went too close to the sun on their chariot they would burn.
The sun uses nuclear fission to produce energy which emits heat.

Hmm. I failed to convince myself against your argument that the sun is hot, not cold. Now I just don't know.


I detect sarcasm yet I feel compelled to tell you the actual color of the sun is really white as viewed from space. Only does it take a yellowish hue from under our atmosphere.



posted on Apr, 26 2011 @ 01:16 AM
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The physical Sun is not necessarily cold per-sé. However, the Illuminati, Rosicrucians, Hermetic-Kabbalists, etc. do affirm that the Sun is inhabitable (see the writings of Samael Aun Weor and Manly P. Hall 33°).


Two very interesting links:



SurfaceoftheSun.com

The Inhabitants of the Sun


Now, to address some issues that would no doubt arise after reading through the above two links (of which agree with one another only to a certain extent):

As far as I understand it, NASA takes black & white photos of phenomena in outer-space, and then colors them in later here on Earth, basically.

Also, if we were to take a picture of the Sun using Kirlian photography, it would of course look like an enormous ball of fire (to say the least), due to the massive amounts of Electronic-Solar energy that Stars emit; that would indeed be Solar "Fire" from an Etheric perspective.



Kirlian Photography and the Appearance of the Sun and Its Temperature




edit on 26-4-2011 by Tamahu because: punctuation



posted on Apr, 26 2011 @ 01:38 AM
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Originally posted by mkkkay

Originally posted by ReVoLuTiOn76
It only gets colder as we go higher because we are leaving our atmosphere, which is what keeps the heat from the sun in...you wont experience any warmth in space.


Is that even if we go near the sun, if we hade wings could we get to the sun or would it be to hot?


google Icarus,

in space, there is a lot of it.

between anything, particles, atoms, planets, molecules etc.


light is a wave and particle, the sun gives off a whole spectrum of electromagnetic radiation.

the earth has plenty of stuff to catch all that and reflect some, like tar on a roof and shade.

the magnetic field helps with some, the ozone layer with others, the aurora borealis is a visual of the former.

space is cold because nothing is there to stop and hold the suns rays.

now, the sun is hot but i think it is the other part of the spectrum's out put that will heat and light planets and such along with the composition of said objects.

a blow torch will get cooler the farther away you get from it, right?

simplistic, yes. wrong? probably, lol!!



posted on Apr, 26 2011 @ 05:27 AM
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reply to post by mkkkay
 


When I first read your title of the thread I thought "Here we go again" I mean the standard of threads has dropped IMHO recently however, I was surprised to see that after reading your opening post that I was completely wrong with this one and that you have now given me much food for thought.

The whole the higher you go the colder it gets, doesn't work for me in regards to 'is the sun cold' however, the fact that we can only measure the suns heat in our own atmosphere leads questions of what can be measured outside of it. Of course not trusting a word that NASA says it certainly has posed a few questions in my mind.

Wouldn't it be a surprise to learn that there are actual beings like us living on what we call a gigantic nuclear fireball only to discover later on that things are not always as they seem from the viewpoint of our earth.

There aren't many threads that grab my attention nowadays but this one truly did. Thank you.

edit on 26-4-2011 by franspeakfree because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by NowanKenubi
 
Yes, that makes a lot of sense, electric. That reminds me of a song, but I can't remember now.

I just thought of something today. It was not long ago, but on the Space Weather site, they said a large comet went right across the face of the Sun and left a gouge streak on the surface. Now if a comet did that and the sun was hot, that comet would have exploded. They did not in anyway explain how this could happen. When I heard that, then I knew I was right about my theory. And you are right, Electric Blue. Thanks



posted on Apr, 27 2011 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by coolottie
 


cool,hot e, and you are holding the sun


i just saw your name and avatar go very well with this thread.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 07:24 AM
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Interesting question. As Wikipedia claims, I think the Sun's surface temperature is many thousands of degrees Celsius, but whether that is "hot" is another thing. Certainly, I don't think humans would last long standing on the Sun's surface, even assuming we could get that far. The stuff of the universe is invisible radiation - our weakness.



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 07:27 AM
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reply to post by kalunom
 
Its hot damn hot erm hot sorry




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