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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

page: 57.htm
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posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by GullibleUnderlord
 


A somewhat large amount of forest here in Georgia was exposed to Cesium-137 due to the Lockheed Nuclear Aircraft Laboratory up in the northern part of the state. They ran all sorts of crazy tests with radiation and nuclear energy. This went on from the late 50s to the early 70's, I believe. Today, you can't tell much went on there. The forest is lush, and the wildlife seems to be fine. There is a chance of radiation sickness if too much accumulates. I'm not entirely sure about increased cancer risks or birth defects, since it's not absorbed by the body in the same manner as iodine is, for instance.
edit on 13-3-2011 by Highground because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by 00nunya00
 


I don't think i will sleep well after reading that.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:55 PM
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The russians are painting it slightly differently




Radiation levels around the Fukushima nuclear power plant's reactor No. 3 hit by a hydrogen explosion on Monday have slightly risen, Japanese government officials said. "The radiation background has increased insignificantly," an economics ministry official said.
en.rian.ru...
edit on 13-3-2011 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:57 PM
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Repost in right order.


Originally posted by Mianeye
Latest situation update Fukushima from:hisz.rsoe.hu...


Situation Update No. 22
On 14.03.2011 at 04:21 GMT+2

The second hydrogen explosion in three days rocked Japan's stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Monday, sending a massive column of smoke into the air and wounding six workers. It was not immediately clear how much — if any — radiation had been released. The explosion at the plant's Unit 3, which authorities have been frantically trying to cool following a system failure in the wake of a massive earthquake and tsunami, triggered an order for hundreds of people to stay indoors, said Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano. The blast follows a similar explosion Saturday that took place at the plant's Unit 1, which injured four workers and caused mass-evacuations. Japan's nuclear safety agency said six workers were injured in Monday's explosion but it was not immediately clear how, or whether they were exposed to radiation. They were all conscious, said the agency's Ryohei Shomi. Earlier, Tokyo Electric Power Co., which operates the reactor, said three workers were injured and seven missing.

The reactor's inner containment vessel holding nuclear rods was intact, Edano said, allaying some fears of the risk to the environment and public. TV footage of the building housing the reactor appeared to show similar damage to Monday's blast, with outer walls shorn off, leaving only a skeletal frame. More than 180,000 people have evacuated the area in recent days, and up to 160 may have been exposed to radiation. Earlier Monday, pressure had jumped inside Unit 3, forcing the evacuation of 21 workers. But they returned to work after levels appeared to ease. Associated Press journalists felt the explosion in the tsunami-devastated port town of Soma, some 25 miles (40 kilometers) north of the reactor. They reported feeling the faint rumble a blast and the ground shaking. At the time, sirens were wailing as rescue workers were in the midst of evacuating all those in the city

Situation Update No. 23
On 14.03.2011 at 04:25 GMT+2

A hydrogen explosion occurred Monday morning at the quake-hit Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant’s troubled No. 3 reactor, the government’s nuclear safety agency said. The 11:01 a.m. incident came after a hydrogen explosion hit the No. 1 reactor at the same plant Saturday, and prompted the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency to urge residents within a 20-kilometer radius to take shelter inside buildings. It also followed a report by Tokyo Electric Power Co., the plant’s operator, to the government earlier in the day that the radiation level at the plant had again exceeded the legal limit and pressure in the container of the No. 3 reactor had increased. The Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant has been shut down since a magnitude 9.0 quake struck northeastern and eastern Japan on Friday, but some of its reactors have lost their cooling functions, leading to brief rises in the radiation level over the weekend. On Monday, radiation at the plant’s premises rose over the benchmark limit of 500 micro sievert per hour at two locations, measuring 751 micro sievert at the first location at 2:20 a.m. and 650 at the second at 2:40 a.m., according to the report. The hourly amounts are more than half the 1,000 micro sievert to which people are usually exposed in one year.

The maximum level detected so far around the plant is 1,557.5 micro sievert logged Sunday. The utility had been pouring seawater into the plant’s No. 1 and No. 3 reactors to help cool their cores, which are believed to have partially melted after part of the fuel rods were no longer covered by coolant water when levels fell following the quake. The seawater injection stopped around 1 a.m. due to the shortage of water left in tanks, but resumed for No. 3 reactor at 3:20 a.m., according to the nuclear safety agency. The halt of coolant water injection apparently caused rising pressure in the reactor container and an increase in the radiation level at the plant, the agency said. TEPCO at one point planned to release radioactive steam from the No. 3 reactor container to depressurize it and ordered workers to vacate the site. But as the pressure later lowered, workers resumed operations at the site, according to the agency. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said pressure in the No. 1 reactor container has been stable and seawater injection for the reactor will resume later.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:57 PM
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these are brave people to be risking their
lives helping out in the quake stricken area.


TextMore than 60 governments offering to help with #quake search and rescue efforts in Japan on.cnn.com...



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by GullibleUnderlord
 


That's why I bought a rototiller today. I'm not trusting west coast food for a long time, and it's just healthier regardless. I'll be ready for whatever happens, even if nothing comes from Japan. Great investment, IMHO.



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:58 PM
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reply to post by GullibleUnderlord

Cesium 135 and 137 undergo beta decay, which is ionizing radiation... they would kill bacteria and probably cause some cancer rate increase after prolonged exposure. Acutely, enough might give you a sunburn. But to make much of a difference would take more cesium than is produced globally in several years time.

The significance of cesium 135 being detected is that under normal circumstances, there is almost none produced... the xenon-135 decays to xenon-136 instead of cesium-135. So detecting a large amount indicates a problem with the reaction controlling mechanisms.

The warnings of local radiation were triggered by the presence of iodine-131.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 13 2011 @ 11:59 PM
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From BBC:


0453: John Keeley from the Nuclear Energy Institute in Washington has told the BBC the hydrogen explosion was similar to the first blast at the plant: "Japanese officials to their credit have come out here quite quickly and suggested that at least at this moment they don't believe there has been any significant radiological release - we will cross our fingers and hope that's the case. It appears that was the case with Unit 1's explosion, we'll hope that's certainly the case with Unit 3."



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:01 AM
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Ok, here the 2nd release about the Daiichi #3 explosion ... it finally showed-up on Tepco's English-langage press-release page ...

(Mar 14,2011)White smoke around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 3 (2nd release)

Basically, it just confirms what I got from the in-line (Chrome/Iron) translate of the Japanese page earlier ...

At approximately 11:01am, an explosive sound followed by white smoke
occurred at the reactor building of the Unit 3. It was believed to be a
hydrogen explosion.

According to the parameter, it is estimated that the reactor containment
vessel remains intact
. However, the status of the plant and the impact of
radioactive materials to the outside environment are presently under
investigation. (previously announced)

As of 12:00 am, 4 TEPCO employees and 2 workers of related companies have
sustained injuries (all of them are conscious) and ambulances are on
their way to care for them.

As of 11:44 am, the measured value of radiation dose near MP6 is 20μSv/h
and the radiation level remains stable.

TEPCO continues to take all measures to restore the safety and security
of the site and are monitoring the site's immediate surroundings.

.. so basically, as far as Tepco releases go, they're still "working-on" reviewing the impact of the explosion.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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BBC updates:
0500: Singapore will be testing imported Japanese produce for possible radiation, officials say - Reuters.

Kyodo link to story
edit on 14-3-2011 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 





TextThe warnings of local radiation were triggered by the presence of iodine-131.

well even the man reporting (downplaying) the
trace amounts on the way to the u.s. said that
the celsium or whatever was apart of it . so trace
amounts of something that has 30 yr shelf life
what does that mean for us i do not know. do you ?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:04 AM
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Japanese utility says radiation levels at damaged reactor were well below level that prompts a govt report - AP http://(link tracking not allowed)/i7cGxw



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by EnhancedInterrogator
they're still "working-on" reviewing the impact of the explosion.

In government-speak, that translates to, "We have no friggin' idea what's going on in that nuclear disaster area. We are having a hard time getting volunteers to go in to inspect it because nobody wants to die. As far as we know the entire containment vessel could have launched into orbit!"



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:08 AM
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reply to post by GullibleUnderlord

Cesium is practically irrelevant. Even if a cloud did come here, cesium would barely move the background radiation levels. Now Iodine-131, as I said, is a different story... it also decays by the beta process, but at a much higher level, causing cancerous growths and cellular deformation/death.

Ironically, high doses of iodine-131 are apparently used in medical treatments of cancer to kill the targeted cancer cells according to our old friend, Wikipedia.


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:10 AM
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reply to post by harrytuttle

As far as we know the entire containment vessel could have launched into orbit!

That's not such a bad idea considering what's been going on over there!

Anyone got a spare rocketship we can borrow?


TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:12 AM
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found some interesting reading In case anyone is bored


Medical aspects of radiation incidents
edit on 14-3-2011 by okiecowboy because: typo



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Can I task you to become an armchair expert on the MOX fuel and its effects? Specifically, the plutonium in fallout (?) and how that will be different; will the plutonium be in the fallout or even these steam/explosion clouds? What difference, if any, will there be in what is released in these ventings and explosions than the #1 reactor?



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by TheRedneck
 


Ok i think i'm understanding now. The lower
half life stuff the worse it is on us correct? And
again what would be the first states impacted ?
i can't find the map . And could you give me your
personal overall evaluation of this situation? like
on a scale to one to ten what would you rate this
current situation concerning the radioactive aspect
and it's danger's to everyone. thankyou. for the input.



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:13 AM
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A very important feature of these results is that there is a very high probability of a melt-through
failure. The probability of an early melt-through failure given core damage is roughly 36% for all
cases. The probability of a failure in this mode is significantly higher than any of the other types


This dominance of the melt-through mode of containment failure was noted in NUREG-1150. It
stems from the fact that the Mark I containment is relatively small, so that if the core were to
melt, it would spread out over a relatively confined area, making it much less likely to cool off
before penetrating the containment than it would be in a larger containment.

www.nrc.gov...



While the authorities continue playing down the possibility of a breach of the primary containment at these reactors, I remain concerned. Fukushima Dai-Ichi reactor Units 1, 2, and 3 are boiling water reactors with Mark I containments. The Mark I is unusually vulnerable to containment failure in the event of a core-melt accident. A recent study by Sandia National Laboratories shows that the likelihood of containment failure in this case is nearly 42% (see Table 4-7 on page 97). The most likely failure scenario involves the molten fuel burning through the reactor vessel, spilling onto the containment floor, and spreading until it contacts and breeches the steel containment-vessel wall.

The Sandia report characterizes these probabilities as “quite high.” It’s not straightforward to interpret these results in the context of the very complicated and uncertain situation at Fukushima. But they are a clear indication of a worrisome vulnerability of the Mark I containment should the core completely melt and escape the reactor vessel.

allthingsnuclear.org...



posted on Mar, 14 2011 @ 12:17 AM
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TextWhile the authorities continue playing down the possibility of a breach of the primary containment at these reactors, I remain concerned. Fukushima Dai-Ichi reactor Units 1, 2, and 3 are boiling water reactors with Mark I containments. The Mark I is unusually vulnerable to containment failure in the event of a core-melt accident. A recent study by Sandia National Laboratories shows



that the likelihood of containment failure in this case is nearly 42% (see Table 4-7 on page 97). The most likely failure scenario involves the molten fuel burning through the reactor vessel, spilling onto the containment floor, and spreading until it contacts and breeches the steel containment-vessel wall.





Dam.



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