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Japan declares 'nuclear emergency' after quake

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posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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Unit 1 Sub-Drain Comparison



September 2011 - January 2012:
www.tepco.co.jp...

January 2012 - May 2012:
www.tepco.co.jp...

June 2012 - Oct. 2012:
www.tepco.co.jp...

So this is the highest reading of Unit 1 sub-drain since September 2011. I'm trying to find readings prior to September 2011....

- Purple Chive
edit on 7-10-2012 by Purplechive because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:36 PM
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A very good talk by the ambassador. Hopefully people will sit up and notice.


Japan Diplomat: Ground underneath Fukushima Unit 4 is sinking — More than 30 inches in some areas — Now in danger of collapse.
enenews.com...

And some new readings.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 08:21 PM
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The question is.... sinking into what?

If the whole site is sinking, is it waterlogged and like a big mud-pie? Or maybe like quicksand and one day it will just go sluuuuup and disappear under the surface?

The other more frightening scenario is that it could easily slide into the sea, opening up the area to the wind and waves and whatever was under the ground would be exposed to the sea washing it all into the ocean.

At least at the moment, we have a little time if we care to try to find a solution. As soon as the whole lot goes belly up, like a ship sinking, there will be no more time and everything (cores, nuke weapons, and anything else they had under there which is now covered up) will be washed into the sea.

Maybe this is what they are hoping, so that it is not their problem any more. They just rope it off, and call it a no-go area. Post a few army guards and then it is done and dusted.

Another thought. They are swiftly running out of human resources so they will have to do something within 6 months otherwise there will be no more Japanese available who are trained in working with nuclear materials. I see them already getting desperate to find new employees for the subcontractors (which is why they use subcontractors as you can shift blame and deny responsibility easily) It has to be Japanese people otherwise the world will know about their secrets...



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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Oct 7th. A current shot of #4.



Still hiding the truck bay opening.

And I'd say this is the same spot they pulled the unused fuel assembly out of.





posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 03:18 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

reply to post by Aircooled
 

That's a very significant video and well worth watching. It was not just the details about Fukushima that interested me, but also the Professor's insights into the "maternal" versus "paternal" cultures -- the latter being an underlying cause of nuclearization (both military and civilian).

In essence, he was saying that trying to solve the nuclear problems on a world-wide scale is virtually impossible as long as we have cultures that are driven by motivations of greed and in which disharmony and inequality are the norms. And yes, we know that in many cultures these days, these are the norms: a disaster occurs somewhere and often there is great discussion about the economic impact -- as if money is more important than people or the environment.

And so it is that disasters like Fukushima not only can happen, but will continue to happen.

Overall, the Professor's assessment of modern "westernized" society as a whole was pretty damning. It was also very realistic. The problem is not just the reactors, but why they were built in the first place -- and why even now, with this disaster still ongoing and with little hope it can ever be fully contained, there are still plans to build more of these things!

The problems of neutron irradiation embrittlement are well known to those who work in the field, and it is also well known that no containment we can devise can overcome this problem. But still, those in power are giving the go-ahead to build more plants that will create more waste that will need to be stored for generations. Why? Because the short-term matters more to them than the long-term.

We are faced with a very small number of very powerful people who have greater wealth and greater personal power as their primary motivation. Whatever horrors they may leave behind for future generations just doesn't seem to concern them at all.

If it did, then there would be many, many thousands working on Fukushima's multitude of serious problems. It would be taken for what it is -- potentially the single greatest threat to all of us in human history. Monetary costs and providing technological and human resources would not be an issue if those who truly make the decisions were willing to make the right ones. But no, they plod along as if they had almost an open-ended time schedule, and instead are using a relatively small number of workers on site and keeping them there beyond what is probably safe.

I don't see any way this is going to end well, even by the darkest definitions of what a good ending might be. We now have confirmation that Unit 4 is sinking, we already knew that Unit 1 is doing likewise (and forgive me if I missed any updates on 2 and 3).

What are the possible causes? There are several, but simply put, building very large, non-interlinked*** heavy structures that close to the coast in an earthquake zone was a recipe for disaster from day one. In fact, it would probably have been a blessing if last year's huge quake had hit some decades earlier when the Fukushima plants were still in the construction phase. At least then they probably would have delayed matters and revised their designs to allow for such a huge event.

*** By non-interlinked I mean that we're looking at individual buildings, not a large and complex but interconnected structure like a suspension bridge, for example. Major bridges in high-seismicity regions are often designed to spread quake shocks over a greater part of the structure and may even have elements built in that can fail to some degree without the whole thing collapsing. These buildings, however, just stand in isolation from each other and when they shake, they have no backup structural system outside their own close confines to alleviate the stresses.

Picture this: get a brick and sit it on some sand in a sand box. Add a little water, then kick the edge of the box a few times. Watch what happens to the brick: it will begin to sink.

An over-simplified analogy, I know, but it's one aspect of what happened. Things have taken longer in the Fukushima case because the scale is different and also the amount of damage to the substrata can vary a great deal. Then there's ingress of ground water and erosion or saturation and so on.

That's why pumping in concrete won't necessarily help much. It can't offset the full effects of the damage that has already occurred, never mind what may still be ongoing.

Anyway I've written enough for now.

Thanks to all of your for your great work.


Mike

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.

edit on 8/10/12 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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Yes, Mike, he made some fantastic points. I just hope his words get out there.
Purple, I zoomed in on that satilite shot from the pdf. The arrow to the right, points to the area where they had the big white tent and orange crane, to load the lead shielded truck with those drums. All that's gone now. Not sure what's there now? More filtration tanks? They seem to go right over to the south end of the suppresion surge tanks, now. The right side of the tanks is where last weeks pump leak was.
Small arrow at the bottom points to what looks like a new road behind the csfp.


More film from Noda's visit.
Looking north across the west side of 5th floor of #4, we see the area in the foreground where they demo'd the blown out floor. The fuel pool would be directly to our right, and the truck bay, they love to hide is straight below us exiting to our left.
Wreckage in the distance is #3.

A nice zoom on #3



Talk on Tepco tapes “doesn’t seem fit to come out of the world’s worst nuclear accident” — Should I write IOU for batteries? asks Fukushima chief “Tomorrow we’re going to a home center to buy stuff.
enenews.com...

Watch: Kids run marathon on street with radioactivity of 134,000 Bq/m2
enenews.com...



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 08:10 PM
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Oct 7th 012. Koriyama city, straight west of fukushima.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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Reading through this topic as suggested in the other... why is this calamity in motion being ignored and buried? What can be done to prevent this from getting even further out of hand, and what must be done to protect those nearby from further ongoing exposure? What is the solution to this?

It's strange to me that for decades we were told that, after Chernobyl, if this ever happened again, it would be an unprecedented catastrophe. But now that it has, we're being told the opposite. That everything is just fine, or at least manageable. Reading through this topic, unless people are simply fabricating evidence (which does not appear to be the case,) it seems undeniable that things left fine a long, long time ago.

What can be done? Peace and best wishes to all.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 05:11 AM
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Originally posted by Purplechive

Unit 1 Sub-Drain Comparison



September 2011 - January 2012:
www.tepco.co.jp...

January 2012 - May 2012:
www.tepco.co.jp...

June 2012 - Oct. 2012:
www.tepco.co.jp...

So this is the highest reading of Unit 1 sub-drain since September 2011. I'm trying to find readings prior to September 2011....

- Purple Chive
edit on 7-10-2012 by Purplechive because: (no reason given)


Sub-drain readings down a little:
www.tepco.co.jp...

And temps down a little:
www.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 05:18 AM
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Radioactivity Density of the Seawater at the North of 1F Unit 5-6 Discharge Channel



A pretty good spike before the bad weather set in:


No sampling survey due to the bad weather on the following days: September 27, 28, 29, October 1, 2, 4, 5, 7


www.tepco.co.jp...

- Purple Chive



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 05:29 AM
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Dry Well? Storage Containers?



Not much success in translation...but looks interesting:
www.tepco.co.jp...

Hopefully will be English soon.

- Purple Chive



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 05:41 AM
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reply to post by Aircooled
 


Fabulous grabs AC!! The place still looks like one hell of a mess.



- Purple Chive



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by AceWombat04
Reading through this topic, unless people are simply fabricating evidence (which does not appear to be the case,) it seems undeniable that things left fine a long, long time ago.

What can be done? Peace and best wishes to all.


Hi AceWombat...

The folks on this thread have done an incredible job of getting to the hard-core evidence and facts about Fuku.

All fabrication of the evidence is attributed to TEPCO, METI and NISA.

- Purple Chive



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 06:07 AM
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Originally posted by JustMike
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

reply to post by Aircooled
 


...there would be many, many thousands working on Fukushima's multitude of serious problems. It would be taken for what it is -- potentially the single greatest threat to all of us in human history. Monetary costs and providing technological and human resources would not be an issue if those who truly make the decisions were willing to make the right ones.

Mike


Agreed Mike. And if there was a massive effort --- it would be hard to hide from everyone and all the folks I encounter wouldn't get a dumb look on their face when I mention this on-going disaster.

Tremendous thanks to ATS for allowing this thread to keep on going and allowing us folks to do the best we can to keep getting the info out there!!

If it wasn't for this thread --- to quote Z:


Truth is if it werent for all the nutcases on this thread Id have taken a long walk off a short pier clothed in a moon suit by now. Luv ya all. Hugs Z!!


www.abovetopsecret.com...

Miss ya Zworld, where ever ya are!!

- Purple Chive extra DIV



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by Purplechive
 


I concur. I only said that because I always take everything with a grain of salt. But the evidence seems quite overwhelming.

But my question remains: what is being done, and what can be done? And what can I do?



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by Purplechive

Dry Well? Storage Containers?



Not much success in translation...but looks interesting:
www.tepco.co.jp...

Hopefully will be English soon.

- Purple Chive



Thank you Enformable and Enenews!!

enformable.com...
enenews.com...

- Purple Chive



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 12:27 PM
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Wait! Isn't that the building with all those rods just sting in a pool on the top floor? if this thing falls isn't that like global extinction event?! Have they moved those rods yet? does anybody know?

Also,... I was realizing. If something were to happen, if like a large area were to be destroyed by a catastrophic war,.. the existing nuke plants could destroy the world. For instance... If the united states had a war like whats happening in Syria,... What happens if war goes through a nuke plant. if the workers themselves evacuate or are killed in too high a number. I'm assuming the military takes over, but if that happens it becomes a rebel target. and with out the personnel to man it and shut it down properly,... everything goes to #. If it happened in one spot, that would likely exasperate the odds of it happening else where due to the floor of refugees and or the arrival of its deadly radiation to another nearby N.plant. long-story short,... if a few of them went down, it would lead to a chain reaction (no pun intended) of plants allover not being serviced and a global extinction from the plants melting down. the only thing that could stop it is if the people at the plants are able to safely shut it down before they all die/disappear/evacuate. I think that society must be kept stable at all times so long as these energy sources are active.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 02:17 PM
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Oct 8th Koriyama City.

Yes the government can help if they are forced to help the kids, by concerned parents, instead of giving millions to tepco.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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Disposable Fukushima workers, “One person can only work for 30mins a day, 20 days a month, one month a life”
fukushima-diary.com...

I know, lets poison some foriegn kids as part of a PR campaign!

Ministry of foreign affairs to invite 10,000 youth from 41 countries to do tasks including removal of debris.
fukushima-diary.com...
A great read.
TEPCO’s lack of findings during Reactor 1 endoscope mission may cast doubt on cold shutdown status

First, the inability to locate the water obviously means that the water being pumped into the containment is escaping, either through a large hole in containment, or a series of smaller holes.
Secondly, if there is no accumulated water, than there is far less shielding and decay heat removal available than TEPCO has accounted for, which would also infer the melted fuel in the containment vessel may be exposed.

enformable.com...



posted on Oct, 10 2012 @ 01:35 AM
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acewombat04

Do you want to be reassured or frightened?
we can do both but neither do much good.
Personally I think things have got to the stage where we are on a 'watching brief' to just watch what goes on and to make comments and observations on them.
Most people outside (this thread) dont want to know anyway as there does not seem to be a solution at the moment to the cores which have fled their buildings which are at the moment sinking into the sea.

Not much we can do apart from try to raise awareness perhaps?
Q





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