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New Sunspot and this could be a big one.

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posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 
Well whaddyou think Phage,..'
' this one looks really mean,.. maybe a satellite exploding, grid burning, lights out kinda sunspot,...




posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks for the link.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:04 PM
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I can understand with everything going on in the news and here on ATS, that people are over-reading into things on the MSM.

But all this is a post about an established headline on Space Weather people. They are saying it might get big. Yes they are sometimes wrong, aren't we all.

Why can't we just go, hmm, interesting article and cool picture?

Instead we have the know-it-all Holiday scientists telling us that it is no big deal. Thanks everyone, but I think I rather look at the picute and go 'Wow', nature is really awesome.

If any sun spot gets big, I think it cool to track and watch. Occasionally, EQ activity seems to be affected by large solar spots and CME's. Remember, I used 'seems'. There is no solid proof. But it would be great to be able to collect more data and prove the connection. I don't care about CME's and the doom and gloom that goes with them.

Thanks, o mighty experts. But I think I'll just keep watching with a great respect for the sun, and the movement of the Earth.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I still think there is a correlation its just not one we know of exactly yet. Like x type of spots can produce y and we previously didn't know about y rays. When those rays are the highest so are big quakes.

Who knows though.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Cool thread Phage. It looks like you have spent a lot of time studying this stuff also. Are you a seismologist?



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:15 PM
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It's just nothing unusual to those who study these things. These people have to have something to write about. Phage wasn't pooh-poohing anybody or anything. He's just done some honest reaearch in the matter, as have I. This is my second time around in a Solar Cycle, and as an Amateur Radio operator, I've got 10 years now of reading and looking at these reports. Just wait till the Sun gets really wratcheded up in two years or so and you won't even remember this report. One reason something like this is reported as so "big" is because this Cycle hasn't been as active as many predicted so far. It doesn't mean it's impossible we will undergo a "kill shot" from a monster CME, just that these things are impossible to predict. These kinds of Scientists lead dull and boring daily lives, so you can't blame them for wanting a few headlines. Maybe it will cause someone to want to be a Solar Astronomer.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by lasertaglover
 

No. But I stayed in a Holiday Inn once.


The thing is, it's just a direct comparison of data that is freely available. More sunspots does not correlate with more, or stronger earthquakes.

I too find observing the Sun fascinating and awesome.

[edit on 7/19/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thanks Phage. I only snuck in and stole a free breakfast at Holiday Inn, so I am only halfway to not knowing much lol.

Anyway, it was some of the other people on this thread that were a little bit irritating.

The power of the sun is amazing to study, and the energy of Mother Earth is so impressive.

I am going to spend some time on your thread about EQ and solar activity. I am a complete EQ junkie, not for the sake of 'Doom and Gloom', but because the planet is so amazing, especially compared to anything we humans can do. I served in the Army for a few years in a Patriot battalion, and back than, we thought we could blow some stuff up.

Ah, the ignorance of youth. Our planet trumps anything that we can do. Thanks again.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by jazz10
 

spaceweather.com is a good resource but they sometimes get it wrong. The STEREO B image shows the whole sunspot, why say "It might be a big one"? We can see the whole thing.


Sunspots are numbered and measured by NOAA only after they come to the earth facing side of Sun. Yes we know how big it is already but if it is not on earth-facing side it´s not officialy sunspot yet.

So spaceweathers "It might be a big one" is 100% correct because we still dont know how big is it because nobody measured it yet.

And for OP: I dont think it´s necessary spamming this site with every new sunspot.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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I was reading the latest predictions of 2010 from the web bot
and it also spoke off a large solarspot in the months juli/august



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Zmurfix
 


Wow.
You're good!
But come on. Of course "they've" measured it.

They've been watching it since it came into view of STEREO B.


[edit on 7/19/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:44 PM
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Sorry
I got used to trying to point things out to people years back and just getting a load of 'government scum' abuse back because it didn't agree with what they wanted. I don't even work for the Government

There does appear to be a pattern amongst a lot of people that they seem to want a disaster, but I should not assume that's everyone's attitude.
I'll try not to be so defensive I become offensive


Back to the subject though, I do believe when we have another major storm like the Carrington event in 1859 there will be far more major consequences than were felt back then. Our level of technology and our reliance on it will mean that any disruption will be particularly harsh to our everyday life.
When one considers the Carrington event caused telegraph stations to catch fire and they were the only buildings to have wires going into them, it should certainly be 'interesting' in our modern society considering how many wires for telephones and power go into buildings now.
A lot can be said for the immediate and repercussive effects, in fact there is a paper written about the subject here:

Severe Space Weather Events--Understanding Societal and Economic Impacts

Ignore the buy link, there is a 'Download free PDF' link below it



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Zmurfix
 


Wow.
You're good!
But come on. Of course "they've" measured it.

They've been watching it since it came into view of STEREO B.

[edit on 7/19/2010 by Phage]


I really believe that they aren´t measuring (area measures) sunspots visible only on stereo. I even think it´s not possible. But of course I can be wrong, it´s only my assumption.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 05:27 PM
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Well at least this is nothing like the largest sunspot ever debacle.
Ahh good times.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 07:04 AM
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Looks like it is a big one. This is what spaceweather are saying about the new emerging sunspot today:

"EMERGING SUNSPOT: On July 19th, a region of high magnetic activity rotated over the sun's southeastern limb. UV telescopes on the Solar Dynamics Observatory recorded these plumes of hot plasma heralding the approach:
White-light images of the emerging region reveal the dark cores of a large and complex sunspot, newly numbered AR1089. Although the sunspot is large, it has produced no flares of note during the first 24 hours of visibility. Readers with solar telescopes are encouraged to monitor the region as it turns to face Earth."

(spaceweather.com...)



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 07:28 AM
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reply to post by Aelfrede
 


Guess we will have to wait and see what happens over the next few days. If the last sunspot is anything to go by then it will be interesting to see the quake activity that will follow.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 11:24 AM
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Latest update by www.spaceweather.com:

UPDATE, JULY 20 @ 1400 UT: The sunspot is now growing even larger. It has a restless magnetic field that is crackling with B- and C-class eruptions, as shown in these movies from SDO. Readers with solar telescopes are encouraged to monitor the region as it turns to face Earth.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by jazz10
 


Earthquakes still being associated with sunspots? I have read the ATS threads on this - we have earthquakes regardless of Sun activity - I don't see the connection.



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 11:43 AM
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Originally posted by deadred
It's just nothing unusual to those who study these things. These people have to have something to write about. Phage wasn't pooh-poohing anybody or anything. He's just done some honest reaearch in the matter, as have I. This is my second time around in a Solar Cycle, and as an Amateur Radio operator, I've got 10 years now of reading and looking at these reports. Just wait till the Sun gets really wratcheded up in two years or so and you won't even remember this report. One reason something like this is reported as so "big" is because this Cycle hasn't been as active as many predicted so far. It doesn't mean it's impossible we will undergo a "kill shot" from a monster CME, just that these things are impossible to predict. These kinds of Scientists lead dull and boring daily lives, so you can't blame them for wanting a few headlines. Maybe it will cause someone to want to be a Solar Astronomer.


I agree whole heartedly, as the author of the 1087 thread, it was not my intent to alarm anyone. I was just interested that 1087 shrunk to almost nothing and then got bigger as it came back around. The sun is starting to wake up again after a nice long quiet period.

It may get more active before they predicted but I haven't noticed anything bigger than a C class flare so far. Earthquakes happen without them.

By the way Phage again, good work on that thread. I know it took you a lot of time and thought to put it together....



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 12:06 PM
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Earthquakes do indeed happen all of the time, regardless of solar activity.

However, a number of people have noticed that the intensity of seismic activity does seem to have some type of correlation when there is strong solar activity.

I am always reminded of the fact that hundreds of years ago, almost everyone on the planet thought that air travel was impossible. Or that there were atoms and molecules, let alone the possibility of splitting them open and harnessing their power.

Science is always evolving, and it would be great if there was research done on this topic. The study of seismic movement has only become mainstream in the last century.

As a species that is pretty fragile, doesn't it make sense to study anything that even has a remote possibility of understanding this planet that we live on?

Earthquakes are a natural process of our planet, and I think it is important to address anything that can give us more knowledge regarding this topic.



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