Where is your Apron? The significance at the very end...

page: 1
25
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
+25 more 
posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 12:11 PM
link   
Tuesday night my grandfather passed away at the age of 92. He was just shy of reaching his 70th year in the Craft. I was able to spend some time with him over the last month, but his lucid moments were short lived. I wish I could say that our last conversation was an esoteric one, but alas it was the sweatshirt I was wearing.

I made it clear to my family that his Apron was to be found, and included with him in his final disposition on this Earth. He didn't want any kind of service, not even a Masonic one, and those wishes have been honored. The Apron was found, and the funeral home that was making the arrangements was founded by a Freemason so they were quite familiar with the proper protocol regarding his Apron.

For those unfamiliar with this aspect of Freemasonry:



When a man is initiated as a Mason, the new Brother is presented with a white lambskin apron, which he usually keeps at home in a special box or a dresser drawer, just as Bill did. In all ages, the color white has been associated with purity and the lamb with innocence. This symbolism is universal, and the Christian Mason notes that the Bible speaks of a person’s sins as being “washed white as snow” and refers to the Master of Nazareth as the “Lamb of God.” In Masonic Lodges today, Masons who are not officers wear undecorated aprons of white cloth or white lambskin.

It is suggested that a Brother’s Masonic apron, such as Bill’s, should be buried with him or burned, if the service is a cremation. His name is on it, so it would be of no use to anyone else except, perhaps, to a family member who is a Mason. Alternatively, you may wish to give Bill’s apron to his Lodge, where his Brothers will archive it in honor of your husband’s longtime service to Freemasonry.

www2.srmason.net...


I've always made it a point to be the one to deliver the Apron Lecture to the newly Initiated Entered Apprentices. It is the first lecture they receive, and I've always felt that it sets the tone for what is to come on their Journey towards Light. My delivery has left more than one EA wide eyed (and a Grand Master in tears once). Like much of Freemasonry's morals veiled in allegory and illustrated by symbols, our passing from this crude existence to a celestial one is one of the key lessons. A Sprig of Acacia is all I need to comfort myself when thinking of my grandfather, as is the that he stood before the Great Architect clothed as Mason who had labored well, and is now ready to labor anew in a far greater endeavor.

I know that different Jurisdictions have different requirements regarding Aprons. In mine, an Apron is provided to all members and visitors to as Lodge as well as the Officers having the appropriate Apron for their Station. When we would go to the Prince Hall Lodge on visitation, we would have to take our own, as they didn't provide any.

So I ask, do you know where your Apron is, and do the right people know what to do with it?


[edit on 8/4/2010 by Mirthful Me]




posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 12:25 PM
link   
reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


Thank you, and congratulations on honoring your Grandfather. In my Lodge, we use cheap cotton aprons for the ceremony and most meetings. The White Leather or Lambskin apron is presented at the return of the 3rd catechism, but I have never heard an "Apron Lecture" outside of the part contained within the EA catechism. I would love to hear it from you. Please U2U me if you have a chance.

Unfortunately, most Masons that I know where their Lambskin apron only once or twice. Once upon presentation, and once again for their funeral. It is a prized possession, and I guess we choose to harbor it safely away, but it seems kind of sad?



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 12:28 PM
link   
The Apron is truly a magical item. I am not a mason, but I have had family who has been. When my Great Great Grandfather passed he gave all his Masonic treasures to his son, except for the Apron. Then when my Great Grandfather passed he gave his Masonic treasures and his fathers down as well.

No one else has joined the Masons in my family, so we donated his medals and few other items to Masonic Hall in our area. Ive always wondered what was done with the apron, now I know. Thank you.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 12:46 PM
link   
reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


I am sure the Father spoke to your Grandfather and Told him "well done, good and faithful servant".

I am sorry for your loss, but I am happy for your grandfather to be able to spend time with His lost loved ones and passed brethren. We recently had a question pop up at our school of instruction. Since the apron is given to a mason during his EA degree, and he is told at that moment, that should he die, his apron will be placed upon his earthly remains, would an entered apprentice be able to have a masonic funeral? Most of the wording in the code for NC stated that masonic funerals were for master masons. I am not sure if this has ever happened, but it is a question that needs an answer.

My apron in in the closet with my other prized possessions and my family does have instructions in the event of my departure. Make sure the apron is with me when I am cremated, and have a party to celebrate my life, not a funeral to lament about my death.

[edit on 8-4-2010 by network dude]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 12:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by getreadyalready
The White Leather or Lambskin apron is presented at the return of the 3rd catechism, but I have never heard an "Apron Lecture" outside of the part contained within the EA catechism.


Ahhh... The variations of Freemasonry... My Grand Lodge has three Apron Lectures to choose from. The one I use is the longest, most complete, and and eloquent... In my opinion at least (It's the longest without a doubt).

An excerpt of the Lecture is available here.

I might have a PDF I made somewhere... It's never been reproduced on the internet as far as I know.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 03:09 PM
link   
reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


Sorry for your loss MM, your Grandfather is now sitting in the Grand Lodge on High and may he look down on all of human ity with compassion and understanding.

My apron is in my library in a special canister I purchased for it after seeing what happened to the apron of a Brother who passed away recently. When his wife brought it to us for the service in was in very poor shape and carried a rather unpleasent smell as the lamb skin had begun to decompose. I recommened keeping it with a dessicant material to keep the humidity in check and to prevent this problem from occuring for anyone else.

I will drink a beer in honor of your Grandfather at our next communication. Networkdude will do the same with some sweet tea. Just remember Network, it is the thought that counts, not the beverage.



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 04:05 PM
link   
This seemed appropriate for the thread. I know it has been up on ATS before, and I have read it a couple of times in lodge. It is always nice to hear again:

I See You've Traveled Some



Wherever you may chance to be--Wherever you may roam,

Far away in foreign lands; Or just at Home Sweet Home;

It always gives you pleasure, it makes your heart strings hum

Just to hear the words of cheer, "I see you've traveled some."



When you get a brother's greeting, And he takes you by the hand,

It thrills you with a feeling that you cannot understand,

You feel that bond of brotherhood that tie that's sure to come

When you hear him say in a friendly way, "I see you've traveled some."



And if you are a stranger, In strange lands all alone

If fate has left you stranded--Dead broke and far from home,

It thrills you--makes you numb, When he says with a grip of fellowship,

"I see you've traveled some."



And when your final summons comes, To take that last long trip,

Adorned with Lambskins Apron White and gems of fellowship--

The Tiler at the Golden Gate, With Square and Level and Plumb

Will size up your pin and say "Walk In",

"I see you've traveled some."



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 11:00 PM
link   
Mirthful Me,

I am truely sorry for you and your family's loss. In my prayers I will remember him tonight. I have also received news of another Brother's passing this evening from a member of my lodge. I guess tonight I will be saying my goodbyes and asking the GAOU to welcome and comfort them both.

I do know where my apron is and I have made it known to my children that I want my son to have it if he wishes.

We have only one Apron Lecture in my jurisdiction, that I am aware of, but it is of the greatest importance and sets the stage for the newly intiated brother as he begins to be introduced to our craft and its tenets and purposes.

My thoughts this evening will be on your Grandfather and your loss.

[edit on 8-4-2010 by sharkman]



posted on Apr, 8 2010 @ 11:15 PM
link   
Hi, and sorry for your loss.


I will have all this to go through soon. I have my initiation near the end of this month.

getting nervous/excited at the same time!



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 12:08 AM
link   
I'm sorry to hear about this loss. It's always hard to lose loved ones.

I keep my Lambskin with my Past Master's Apron that my Lodge presented me after my year as Master. If I travel I have a cylinder I keep my PM apron in so I don't have to carry the case around (its not exactly small or compact).

[edit on 9-4-2010 by KSigMason]



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 12:36 AM
link   
Sorry for you loss MM.. but


wow.. in an age when people bag so many 'cults' like religion for their pomp and bombast... weeehoo..

Just bury me with a bottle of wild turkey, and let the worms at it all.

No disrespect intended mind you.. Your loss is felt.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 12:46 AM
link   
Our departed brother is in the Celestial Lodge above where the Supreme Architect of the Universe presides. My condolences to you and your family brother. I just recently lost a family member who was a brother as well. It is a real heart lugger to hear the ceremony and the ritual used for the showing. Some of the same ritual is used as when you receive your apron and it is just emotional to hear that the last time that lecture was given to him he was the youngest entered apprentice in the lodge and now he is at the grave receiving the same speech he heard.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 06:20 AM
link   
Thank you for the heartfelt words and reminder of duties promised, MirthfulMe.

Wet with sweat he smiles
The trowel cleaned; the bond set
New Work to be done


The Work
By Montford C. Holley

The gavel sounds and all is still:
The Master speaks, proclaims his will:
Each one obeys, takes up his tools.
Inspects the plan, consults the rules:
With trowel and level, plumb and square,
Each stone is set exactly where
The plan provides, the drawing shows
And day by day the Temple grows:
The porch is finished, pillars placed;
The strands of net-work interlaced;
The chambers furnished, pavement laid,
The sacred vessels all displayed:
The walls are standing straight and true;
The roof is on, the labor through:
The Master speaks, The work is done:
The gavel sounds, God calls us home.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 07:59 AM
link   
Sorry to hear about your grandpa mate.. but from the sounds of it he lived a long life, which deserves a proper raising of the glass (which at this time is orange juice...
)

I know exactly where my apron is.. it's in the trunk of my car. I have no idea why.. it's the only thing in there actually, and when my fiance told me to move it somewhere safer I thought about it, and thats where I want it.


I've told my ma that I was to be buried with it.. I think that freaked her out. I told my fiance and she looked like she thought I was insane that of all the request I could make it would be to have my apron (which no one has ever seen me wear even). That.. and whiskey is to be served liberally at my wake. So I will have to hope that when my time comes someone remembers a brief akward conversation they had about me regarding my blank, unadorned white apron sitting in the trunk of my car.

I have however heard many moving stories about aprons .. a few years ago I met a guy in one of my philosophy classes that was in the Marines. He told me that when he joined he met several others that were Masons as well, and made a pact that should any one of them die as soon as possible their aprons would be placed on their corpse. He said they went to great lengths to make sure it happened, they traded their aprons amongst themselves, so that when one died, another had his apron with him, to place on his corpse.. that way it wouldn't be bloodied, or destroyed depending on the grisly way they died. As far as I know no one he knew did die.. but I thought it was interesting.

I've also seen on one occasion an apron being sold in a box at a garage sale.. I didn't ask why, how or anything, just the site was slightly disturbing.. it's kinda like used Masonic rings, it creeps me out.. but I guess some people really don't care about such things.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:50 AM
link   
Sorry for your loss.
Tonight I receive my first degree, thank you for sharing.

-Al



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:57 AM
link   
reply to post by Rockpuck
 


Thanks RP.


The trunk of your car sounds odd, and maybe not as "safe" as some other locations... Just my opinion.

As far as your wishes... All of them should be written down. Sure, you can tell people what you want, but nothing beats the written word when you can no longer speak for yourself.

You might want to print the SRSJ article I quoted and linked to, and have your family read it. It may remove the "mystery" of your "insane request."

As for Masonic items at garage sales and in antique stores... I'm a sucker for them... I just can't feel comfortable with the thought of them being in the hands of the profane, especially if they aren't even related family. If there are Masonic items and there are no remaining Masonic members in the family, it is certainly appropriate to return the items to the Lodge where they will be kept in an dignified and appropriate manner.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by AlBeMet
Sorry for your loss.
Tonight I receive my first degree, thank you for sharing.

-Al


Thank you as well.


Perhaps this thread will give you greater cause to focus in on your Apron Lecture. I sometimes fear that at so early a moment in the Journey towards Light, that true meaning and significance of the presentation of your Apron is lost. When properly conveyed, it is a truly sobering moment. I would hazard a guess that most people never have a tangible object that is inextricably tied to their mortality save their own body. Tonight you will be given an honor that cannot be equaled this side of the Celestial Lodge. What you will hold in your hands, and wear when properly instructed, will be with you at the very end. Few have such an item... Revere it, take care of it, and when the time comes, it will adorn you on your greatest travel.

Congratulations on your first Step.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by Mirthful Me

Originally posted by AlBeMet
Sorry for your loss.
Tonight I receive my first degree, thank you for sharing.

-Al


Thank you as well.


Perhaps this thread will give you greater cause to focus in on your Apron Lecture. I sometimes fear that at so early a moment in the Journey towards Light, that true meaning and significance of the presentation of your Apron is lost. When properly conveyed, it is a truly sobering moment. I would hazard a guess that most people never have a tangible object that is inextricably tied to their mortality save their own body. Tonight you will be given an honor that cannot be equaled this side of the Celestial Lodge. What you will hold in your hands, and wear when properly instructed, will be with you at the very end. Few have such an item... Revere it, take care of it, and when the time comes, it will adorn you on your greatest travel.

Congratulations on your first Step.


Thank you for the well wishes. To be honest I don't know what to expect tonight. I was just told to be clean of mind and body (and underwear).
I'm sure your story will have more meaning to me tomorrow. I will keep your post in my thoughts as I go through.

-Al



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:29 AM
link   
reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


Well if you saw my interm appartment at the moment.. or my tiny appartments in the past.. things get lost. And I like to travel, visit other lodges, can't loose my apron if my lady can't clean (ie, loose) where I put it.
few weeks I'll have my house, and perhaps a home for it. Hell.. my bible and certificates are in a box, god knows where..

I have no written instructions for my death.. far to morbid for a young lad like me... awkward enough having to get life insurance lol.

Did your grandfather have any reason to reject any ceremony? I've never seen the masonic ceremony at a funeral my self.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 09:30 AM
link   
reply to post by AlBeMet
 


Ahhh well, an early congratulations on your first step in Masonry. I hope that you have a wonderful experience and that you are able to take in a lot regardless of the position that you will be in lol. My advice to you is that you should, as you have already been told, go in with a (very)open mind and just go with the flow and you will be alright. Some lodges who practice Traditional Observance/T.O or European Style lodge's will have a "Chamber of Reflection" room where you are able to reflect upon your life and journey. I am curious as to know if your lodge does this. After you receive your first degree would you be so kind as to inform me if they do or not?

And yes....clean underwear would be nice too.





top topics
 
25
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join


Haters, Bigots, Partisan Trolls, Propaganda Hacks, Racists, and LOL-tards: Time To Move On.
read more: Community Announcement re: Decorum