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Where is your Apron? The significance at the very end...

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posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 10:17 AM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
Did your grandfather have any reason to reject any ceremony? I've never seen the masonic ceremony at a funeral my self.


He didn't reject it as much as his humble nature eschewed it. He was from a different era... He didn't like anything flashy, he was a spartan man through and through. I think the idea of people "interrupting their schedule" just to see him off went directly against his grain. I could tell stories of how he would try to instill the same values on his "spoiled grandchildren" like taking me on a fishing trip (out in the Gulf Stream miles from any land) and when lunchtime came around the only option was the bait bucket. He'd partake... He could play it for all it was worth and of course I was horrified... Now I spend the big bucks in sushi restaurants to basically do the same thing... Guess he was crazy like a fox...

No, pomp and circumstance didn't suit him, and so his wishes were observed and he departed with barely a whisper.

On a side note, there is the fine art of the Masonic obituary. Take the time to write down your Lodge name and number, whether it is F&AM or AF&AM, any concordant bodies and any significant office held like Past master or Potentate. It's quite possible your family will have no idea as to these details... Your Lodge is always a great source of assistance.




posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by bushidomason
 


I know there are two of us receiving our first degree tonight. I asked my "Guide" if I can go first so I can witness what I go through, my request was granted. In turn I was asked if I was sure I wanted to go first. That made me a little nervous lol.

As for your question I'm not sure I will be able to answer that.


-Al



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 11:38 AM
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Sorry for you loss.

When I lost my father, I had not become a Freemason yet and I didn't understand that his apron should had gone with him. I now keep it with mine own and have instructed my family that when I pass that I should be wearing mine and have his in my hand. Hopfully we will all meet up again in the Great Lodge Above.



posted on Apr, 9 2010 @ 08:21 PM
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Sorry for your loss Brother. I am sure that you're granddad was an upstanding man, if your character is any barometer. I'll raise to a glass to him as well.

Our Grand Lodge does things a little different than yours it seems. We are only presented our lambskin Aprons during the initiation. They are returned at the end of the evening and after being raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, you are presented with your formal apron.

There are a few lambskin aprons kept on hand, as well as a few cloth ones, for visitors who may need them.

I had the honour of attending a masonic funeral about 6-7 months ago. It brought to the front of my mind the thought of what I want when I die. Although still relatively young, the Great Architect calls us at his pleasure, not ours. So I put in writing that I would like to be buried with my Apron. I don't want a full funeral, but my apron will go with me when I pass.

And yes, brother, I know exactly where my apron is. In the top of my closet, safely tucked away for the next several years as I make the trip the through the offices of the lodge. I won't be needing at unless I go visit for a while. A slightly relevant story. The secretary of my lodge retired this year after 25 years of holding the office. A few people joked with the old fella about having to track down his apron now that he will be back sitting amongst the Bretheren during meetings. He just smiled and said.. 'I always know where my apron is" This thread just brought this back to my mind.



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


I'm humbled. Your story brought so much more meaning to me. As I walked the path, I kept you and your family in my thoughts.

Thank you brother.

-Al



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by AlBeMet
 


Thank you... It demonstrates that even within an undesirable (though inevitable) event that some good can spring forth. Much like the Sprig of Acacia, Freemasonry renews itself as the years pass with the next generation who seeks Light. I have no doubt that my grandfather is pleased that the end of his Journey may have in a small way aided in the start of another's.

I know I have previously posted this in Brother Paul's Thread but it would seem appropriate here as well...



Echoes

Fine men have walked this way before,
Whatever Lodge your Lodge may be;
Whoever stands before the door,
The sacred arch of Masonry,
Stands where the wise, the great, the good,
In their own time and place have stood.

You are not Brother just with these,
Your friends and neighbors; you are kin
With Masons down the centuries;
This room that now you enter in
Has felt the tread of many feet,
For here all Masonry you meet.

You walk the path the great have trod,
The great in heart, the great in mind,
Who looked through Masonry to God,
And looked through God to all mankind
Learned more than word or sign or grip,
Learned Man's and God's relationship.

To him who sees, who understands,
How mighty Masonry appears!
A Brotherhood of many lands,
A fellowship of many years,
A Brotherhood so great, so vast,
Of all the Craft of all the past.

And so I say a sacred trust
Is yours to share, is yours to keep;
I hear the voice of men of dust,
I hear the step of men asleep;
And down the endless future, too,
Your own shall echo after you.

-Douglas Malloch



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 01:58 PM
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Mirthful Me, I wish your grandfather merry travels in the next life.

Luck to you and your family.



posted on Apr, 10 2010 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


it's ironic with the timing of things. Today, I took part in my first masonic funeral. The brother who passed was young. 47. I didn't know him, but I knew of him. His casket had a square and compass on it. Sadly, we placed a cloth apron on his casket as his true apron hadn't been brought by the family. We all placed a sprig of acacia on it and saluted him with grand honors. It was a unique experience. I will have the pleasure of initiating a good friend on the 20th of this month. I will make sure to let him know about the significance of the lambskin, or white leather apron during his training. Your family was in my prayers today as well as the brother who passed.



posted on Apr, 11 2010 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


Both you and your family are in my thoughts and prayers.

Your grandfather has cast a long shadow and help raise a good man. Without a doubt he will hear the words we all strive to hear at the end of our travels on this plain of existence.

I too can lay my hands on my white lambskin, but thank you for the advise about putting it in writing as to what should be done with it.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 04:09 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


*SNIP*

Just to stay on topic, I would love to hear from the posters that were about to be initiated. How did the initiation go? Were you presented "real" Aprons, or were they temporary cloth ones? Did you receive an "Apron Lecture" or only the EA lecture. Were you impressed or disappointed with the experience?

Mod note: Stay On Topic. Thanks.


[edit on 14/4/2010 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Apr, 15 2010 @ 08:34 PM
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First and foremost, well wishes to you and yours Mirthful. It is indeed a heavy hearted moment on this day we find ourselves in the springtime of our year. A physical journey has ended, yet it is joyous that a celestial journey to the great architect begins in this time of life on our material existence. It reminds us that life does truly spring eternal in the heavens as so below them. So mote it be. And so on this eve in service of you and yours mirthful I offer my reflection and prayer, and indeed i shall raise my drink with sup tonight in honor of a brothers continued journey.

reply to post by AlBeMet
 


AlBeMet I'd like to congratulate you on your first step in a lifelong journey and i hope you meet many brethren and fellows along the way. I myself have received the second degree and continue on my path to receive the sublime 3rd degree as full master within a months time. May you receive much light my brother. Something to consider as well, on the days/ night of the degree I fast the day of and bathe, meditate and reflect immediately before the degree ceremony. It leaves our material selves fresh, clean of both mind body and spirit, through fasting of self sacrifice( to make sacred) to wash and clean our earthly bonds, as well as reflection to cleanse or minds of any impure or unnecessary thoughts on that important eve of the ceremony.






[edit on 15-4-2010 by LurkingSleipner]



posted on May, 3 2010 @ 07:03 AM
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edit: on second thought, what I wrote was completely off topic.

[edit on 3/5/10 by B.Morrison]



posted on May, 23 2010 @ 06:19 AM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Funny, I was told something similar to this after entering an New Age store. The guy was like, "I see you've travelled seeking for something" or something like that. In hindsight, he was probably trying to offer me a five-pointed discount, if you know what I mean.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 12:51 AM
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reply to post by Mirthful Me
 


Great post!! Being at least the 4th generation of my family to join Freemasonry, I have come to love the teachings of the three degrees and all that Masonry has to offer. I have listened to the Apron lecture of the 1st degree countless times and always seem to get a chill when I hear it. The apron itself is just a symbol of the life every man should lead, Spotless and pure. My apron is right next to my bed, to remind me everyday to live a life worthy of being called a "good and faithfull servant".



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 01:21 AM
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I have a question for the freemasons on board.

My grandfather was a Mason, he died (and was buried in his apron). At his funeral though, local Freemasons arrived to preform their ceremony, and for some reason (probably misguided religious reason) my uncle without the consent of his siblings turned them away.

Would that be construed as offensive to you gentlemen? I thought it was very rude, and actually feel like I should contact my local lodge, and apologize for my uncle.



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 05:00 AM
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reply to post by FuZe7
 


In and of itself? No. It's possible that some of the brethren groused at not being able to bid farewell to your grandfather as a friend of however many years but the death of a loved one is always stressful and funerals can be chaotic.

HTH
Fitz



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by LurkingSleipner
 


I really liked the 2nd degree, it was like a movie but with me in it.


Others say it’s like they were watching from the highest point of a building, and now I understand.

-Al



posted on May, 24 2010 @ 08:07 AM
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Originally posted by FuZe7
I have a question for the freemasons on board.

My grandfather was a Mason, he died (and was buried in his apron). At his funeral though, local Freemasons arrived to preform their ceremony, and for some reason (probably misguided religious reason) my uncle without the consent of his siblings turned them away.

Would that be construed as offensive to you gentlemen? I thought it was very rude, and actually feel like I should contact my local lodge, and apologize for my uncle.


We don't usually show up at funerals unless requested by the family or the person that passed. If your grandfather was buried in his apron, then he probably requested a Masonic Funeral, so your uncle more than likely went against your grandfather's wishes, but I doubt if any feathers were majorly ruffled. Probably just at little grumbling for the members having left work and gone to the funeral for no reason.

The Masonic Last Rites are very pretty and somber and your family would have enjoyed the ceremony though.



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by FuZe7
I have a question for the freemasons on board.

My grandfather was a Mason, he died (and was buried in his apron). At his funeral though, local Freemasons arrived to preform their ceremony, and for some reason (probably misguided religious reason) my uncle without the consent of his siblings turned them away.

Would that be construed as offensive to you gentlemen? I thought it was very rude, and actually feel like I should contact my local lodge, and apologize for my uncle.


It depends on the circumstances... If your grandfather made any requests or arrangements for a Masonic ceremony then I think there should be some offense... By you and your family. I think that the wishes of the deceased are a right exclusively held by the decedent... Not anyone else. I have been down this road before with my father, and now my grandfather... My grandfather was quite specific about the disposition of his ashes... In writing and verbally... It was no secret... His wife, however, refuses to even go and collect the ashes from the funereal home! I'm livid that for reasons I won't even get into, his earthly remains are relegated to to an inglorious perch on a storage shelf. Alas, I and those that care, are currently powerless to remedy the situation. Each person's requests regarding their final and permanent resting should be respected by all... Regardless of personal beliefs and expectations.

I hope to soon resolve the issue...






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