Air France Plane down

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:02 AM
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Originally posted by sy.gunson
reply to post by thebox
 





Actually this is abovetopsecret.com. Where's the harm in speculation? Be it supernatural or otherwise? As of this moment in time, this is a genuine mystery and should be treated as such.


Because to make a game of other people's tragedy is macabre and offensive.


Well, I suppose that in this age when so often things are not as they outwardly appear, a little respectful speculation is probably a healthy thing... with the word 'respectful' being primarily operative regardless of cause.




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:09 AM
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Where there any Australians onboard? My 21 yo daughter and her boyfriend are travelling in that vicinity. Last contact I had with her was 5 days ago from France. They were bound for Rio, Spain and Morocco in which order I do not know. This news is very disurbing.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:10 AM
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Wow. I hope everyone is okay. I can't imagine what it would be like for your own plane to crash.

My thoughts and positive energy to them.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:10 AM
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reply to post by dreamsrfree
 


The plane was travelling from Brazil to France. So if they were in France 5 days ago, they should be ok.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:13 AM
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Maybe off-topic but what about solar flares, anyone checked that NASA site if there was a spike in activity last night. Electromagnetic storms can offset electronics and a very famous physicist warned about the coming high intensity of the sun last year if i remember correct. Something to do with miscalculations and a 20 fold error.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:15 AM
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This makes no sense at all, if the plane failed to check in just after it left the brazilian coast (check route, it crosses an island) it would have reached a minimum altitude of at least 30.000 feet. At least. (30 minutes of climb at an average of 1500fpm)

With this kind of altitude they would have been well above any storm system and clear of turbulance.

With this kind of altitude nothing can happen that would at least give the crew time enough to locate an alternative runway, or clearly state a mayday and the exact nature of the problem.

Unless, again, something abrupt happened that did not give them that time.

Even with a short circuit, they would have been able to communicate through backup systems...

There must have been an abrupt event.

TH4



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:16 AM
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Air France PR director, François Brousse, states the aircraft was likely struck by lightning.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:21 AM
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Originally posted by Manouche
Air France PR director, François Brousse, states the aircraft was likely struck by lightning.


A modern airbus can be struck with lightning many times up in the air without anything happening, its made of aluminum.


Since the outer skin of most airplanes is primarily aluminum, which is a very good conductor of electricity; the secret to safe lightning hits is to allow the current to flow through the skin from the point of impact to some other point without interruption or diversion to the interior of the aircraft.


Source: www.physlink.com...


Then, during a 1980s lightning research project, NASA flew an F-106B jet into 1,400 thunderstorms and lightning hit it at least 700 times. The lightning didn't damage the airplane, but the data the jet collected showed that lighting could induce relatively small electrical currents that could damage electronic systems. This led to regulations that require aircraft electrical and electronic systems, as well as fuel tanks and lines, to have built-in lightning protection.


Source: www.usatoday.com...

[edit on 2009/6/1 by reugen]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by dreamsrfree
 


Calls for Emergency information can be made to these numbers:

Calls from the UK: 0800 800 812

Calls from outside France : +33 1 57 02 10 55



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:22 AM
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They only have 6 weeks left to travel and were going to Rio de Janiero, Spain, Portugal, Morooco, Switzerland and England so it's a good possiblity they may have gone to Rio for 5 days first considering all the places they have yet to see.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:24 AM
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Planes can still survive lightning strikes. Hopefully, the plane was able glide and land in the sea, and evacuate people onto rafts.

And it's not obscene to speculate possible "paranormal" activity, since planes have disappeared without a trace before. However, it is way too premature to speculate, since it seems more likely something more "mundane" has happened. Given reports of electrical shorts, bad weather, and other factors, it is likely something more "natural" has occurred here.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:25 AM
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hot news:


www.bangaloreaviation.com...

grounded march 22nd with major elecrical problems in the avionics bay


AND

a hydraulic problem when due to fly out


maybe a maintenance issue?



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:29 AM
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Air France said the plane sent an automatic message at 0214 GMT reporting a short circuit after turbulence, and may have been struck by lightning.

From the BBC: news.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by reugen
 


Yes, that is why I posted it. As far as I know, modern aircraft fuselage are built like a Faraday cage. But I, myself, don't have the knowledge to totally dismiss the possibility.
Besides, it is an official statement. But they might be trying to avoid any questions raised about the maintenance or else.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:32 AM
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are planes supposed to cope with

* electro-magnetic storm ? (wouldn't that break also back-up systems ?)

* HAARP activities ?

it seems strange that almost no information at all are coming in... just like if they were brainstorming now, looking for some kind of official story for the mass media



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:36 AM
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Live conference with Air France Chief on Sky News now: 03:30 was the last contact with missing plane.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:38 AM
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Is the plane flying anywhere over the Bermuda triangle?
This will be another mysterious case then.

If the jet has crashed in the ocean due to electronic failure, will it disintegrate immediately?



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by hitmen
 


No the bermuda triangle is far up north, north of cuba and east of florida, out in the north atlantic ocean, the air france airbus disappeared in the south atlantic ocean off the coast of brazil on its way to paris.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:46 AM
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Originally posted by hitmen
Is the plane flying anywhere over the Bermuda triangle?
This will be another mysterious case then.

If the jet has crashed in the ocean due to electronic failure, will it disintegrate immediately?


Pretty much, unless the pilot was able to perform some sort of landing on the water, but if he had enough time to run through the ditching procedure he would have had enough time to make a mayday call.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:46 AM
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Having lived in Rio for 4 years and flown in and out of GIG twice a year it pains me to see such a tragedy like this unfold


Like said earlier in the thread, flights tend to stick pretty close to the coast line before darting out over the Atlantic to re-connect with the coast of West Africa.

From my experience of flying in that area, I never really felt any turbulence until we reached North West Africa and the Bay of Biscay. (Which is on approach)
Not to say that there wouldn't be turbulence else where... Just my experiences.

But again, if they were flying at the right altitude they should presumably have avoided any large storms?

In any case, Ive been frantically calling close family friends out there to make sure no one was on the flight. Right now I'm just praying for the families and those on the plane





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