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Greys - good or bad?

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posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 02:58 AM
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reply to post by Watcher-In-The-Shadows
 


Humans are not animals and it is foolish to compare the animal kingdom to the human condition.




posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:00 AM
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reply to post by Watcher-In-The-Shadows
 


Universal facts? What are those?
I am very calm thank you.

I only deal in universal truths.

[edit on 21-3-2009 by spacecowgirl]



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:04 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 


How are we not animals, pray tell? In your own words please. Seeing as to how your using this after I shot down your assertion that how we treat animals is not simular to how they are treating us.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:06 AM
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reply to post by Watcher-In-The-Shadows
 


Are you honestly asking how you are different to a cow? or a dog? or a rat? And you really don't know?



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:07 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 


*sighs and shakes his head*

fact (n)
Synonyms: piece of information, detail, datum, circumstance, statistic, element, point
Synonyms: truth, reality, actuality, verity
Antonym: fiction
Synonyms: happening, deed, occurrence, event, act, circumstance

I trust you know what a synonym is. You are confusing your beliefs with universal fact. You are welcome to your beliefs of course, but don't pretend I am required to agree.
And if your not I would hate to see you when you are.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:08 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 


Answer the question please.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:13 AM
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reply to post by Watcher-In-The-Shadows
 


You will need to find your own answers. Search for truths yourself. Look within. I cannot teach you. You must knock and the door will open, seek and you will find.

The entire universe is within you.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:16 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 


I have found what I think to be "my" answers. And they are quite different than what you believe I assure you.
But anyrate, going to answer my question or not?
How are we not animals?



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:24 AM
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Causality!

ok here is one tiny little thing for you to get your teeth into:

Causality in Non-Humans
Jennifer Vonk
We have recently argued that one fundamental difference between the conceptual systems of humans and other primates may be that humans alone are capable of reasoning about ‘imperceptibles’, defined as abstract theoretical constructs that can not be directly perceived through the senses. One particular class of ‘imperceptibles’ is the class of constructs that indexes causal forces. Although non-humans are extremely keen observers of perceptual features in the environment, and appear to understand the role of observable contingencies in the outcome of various events, we argue that they do not posit the existence of causal forces underlying these observable behaviors and events. Non-humans may not reason about ‘imperceptibles’, (including causal forces), because of a second key distinction between human and non-human conceptual systems; humans alone strive to explain as well as to predict events. This second distinction, which is inextricably tied to the first, may inspire a fruitful avenue of research in comparative psychology.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:28 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 

Firstly, how do we know what animals think? Secondly, here is an intresting article I found for you to chew over.

Think people are the only ones who can plan for the future? You may change your mind when you hear the story of Santino the chimpanzee, whose premeditated attacks on zoo visitors are described today in Current Biology.

When Santino was first transferred to Sweden's Furuvik Zoo in 1983 at the age of five, he was relatively calm and passive, lead study author Mathias Osvath, a postdoctoral student in cognitive sciences at Lund University in Sweden, tells ScientificAmerican.com. But by the time the primate reached sexual maturity at age 17, he had become so aggressive that he killed the only other male chimp at the zoo. (Oddly, Santino had saved the life of his comrade just five years earlier by untangling a play rope that had wrapped around his neck.)

It was shortly after this fatal attack that zookeepers began to notice that Santino had developed a habit of throwing stones at zoo visitors, who were safely situated behind a five-foot- (1.5-meter-) high fence. The fence was located some 30 feet (nine meters) from the enclosure's chimp island, which is surrounded by a water moat that prevents the chimps (which over the years have ranged between four and seven individuals of mixed ages and genders) from approaching them.

Every day around 11:00 A.M., Osvath says, Santino would put on a show of dominance (typical of male chimps), which entailed yelling and running around dragging branches. His macho display elicited laughter from zoo-goers, except, that is, when they became targets of Santino's rock missiles. Every so often, the chimp would pick up a stone and chuck it toward the crowd, causing it to disperse. Initially, Santino would only lob one rock at a time. But zoo workers in 1997 reported that the chimp had begun hurling "hailstorms" of stones.

Workers wondered where Santino was getting his ammunition (there weren't many stones just laying around the island) and decided to investigate. One morning, they discovered several piles of three to five stones carefully placed along the waterfront. They suspected that Santino must have been stockpiling them in anticipation of throwing them – and that they came from the water in the moat, because they were covered with algae. To confirm their suspicions, a zoo worker began watching the chimps from a building overlooking the island every morning, and discovered that Santino –the only one of the bunch that threw stones -- would routinely reach into the moat and scoop out rocks, placing them in piles along the waterfront. He would always scavenge before the zoo opened at 10:00 A.M., so that his arsenal was ready for his 11 A.M. show.

Over the years, Santino's operation has become increasingly sophisticated, Osvath says, progressing from simple gathering to fabrication. He has been observed chipping away at the concrete rocks on the island with his hands to sculpt dessert plate–size discs to launch at zoo visitors. In the past decade, zoo workers have witnessed him throwing stones on about 50 separate occasions. Santino has managed to hit a handful of gawkers during his assaults but, happily, none have been injured.

Osvath says Santino's behavior shows that chimpanzees—like people—can plan for the future. "He is not driven by an immediate physical or physiological need …[but]… by an image of his future mental and physiological state," he says. "He is extremely calm when collecting stones, and then becomes very agitated when throwing them." This indicates he can diligently take actions that will prepare him for future events.

Lisa Parr, a primatologist at Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta, Ga., says stonethrowing is common among chimps, gorillas and other primates. But stones aren't the only things they toss.

"I've seen chimps poop in their hand, wait, and then throw it at people," she says, noting that this is just another piece of a bounty of evidence showing that chimpanzees prepare for the future. "There are reports in the literature that chimps might even use medicinal plants" to treat ills, she says, adding that researchers have observed sickly wild chimps leave their packs and go off into the woods alone to eat certain plants, which chemists have shown to have medicinal properties. Parr says that even some birds appear capable of planning, noting that those in the crow family have been observed secretly hiding food from their feathered friends.

As for Santino, he was still hurling away as of last summer, but Osvath says he may have called it quits by this summer. The reason: the zoo castrated him in the hope of tamping down his aggression.

SOURCE:www.sciam.com...



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:33 AM
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Greys - good or bad?

Good: They remind me of little ants, farmers working together for the survival of their colony, carrying their little eggs and larvae away from water flooding underground.

Bad: Because these 'ants' run all over the place as pests. BUT, they do seem to clean house, taking crumbs and other fallen critters away to be eaten and recycled.

Overall, I don't know if 'greys' are robots or not.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:34 AM
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Great disrailing of an alien thread! Well done.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:35 AM
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reply to post by pikypiky
 


What experience have you had with aliens may I ask?



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:41 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 


Merely answering your statement.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:44 AM
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reply to post by Watcher-In-The-Shadows
 


No, not answering. Doing your whole ego trip on animals are the same as humans (even when you know they are not). It is not what the thread is about. It is disrailing. Start a new thread if that topic interests you so much. This thread is about greys.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:49 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 


Um no I know that we are animals. And we went off on this tangent at your prompting after I pointed the parrells between how they treat us *the Greys* with how we treat them, meaning animals.


[edit on 21-3-2009 by Watcher-In-The-Shadows]



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 03:52 AM
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Are you like 12 or something?



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 04:04 AM
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reply to post by spacecowgirl
 


One could ask you the same question.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 04:38 AM
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Back on topic please.

And no more 1 line snipes.

Thank you.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 07:13 AM
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Originally posted by spacecowgirl
reply to post by Watcher-In-The-Shadows
 


No, not answering. Doing your whole ego trip on animals are the same as humans (even when you know they are not). It is not what the thread is about. It is disrailing. Start a new thread if that topic interests you so much. This thread is about greys.


That's right. It is totally disrailing. Also a ridiculous argument. If "Watcher-In-The-Shadows" -- who obviously takes pride in his evil to flaunt it in his avatar -- thinks he is an animal, let him go bury his bone, go out sniffing people's butts, and start humping a table leg. True many people act as barbaric as animals, live for the moment, live by their instincts, have no conscience or restraint, which is why the Bible compares them to dumb animals in need of a bit in their mouth to control them.

But other people know there is more to life than getting the next meal or the next twinge in their genitals.

I for one would like to know anything you can tell about your experience being abducted and having your child stolen from you. Far as I can see, this is all black ops military, Nazi, Zionist, Fourth Reich stuff, beyond evil, even more evil than a cobra in its den (maybe that's why Jesus called the Pharisees a Den of Vipers).

Evil slinks around, abducts and 'disappears' people, which is why the Bible says that men-stealers will go to Hell and why up to the last moment before Jesus comes back the people "Wound not repent of their sorceries."

Sorcery: how to gain power over people by lies and stealth and force and deceit and by weakening them by poison and drugs. Those sorcerers who take pride in being like animals, or as Anton LaVay said, "Do as thou wilt."

Yeah, they are animals. Just like them, only worse. No animal could be as evil as they, not an alligator or a cobra or a scorpion or a black widow spider.



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