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UFO in my pond

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posted on Aug, 29 2008 @ 06:19 AM
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Hi LunarLooney1,

Thanks for your post. Certianly a very interesting rock you have there.

I was just curious if the sample is attracted to water?

Thanks

C-BuZz




posted on Aug, 29 2008 @ 06:45 AM
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reply to post by LordThumbs
 


Please put your posts in EX Quotes, other wise it is classed as plagarism.

thanks

snoopyuk



posted on Aug, 29 2008 @ 07:26 AM
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ok not sure if anyones already asked this... but...
you say that all metals will stick to it like a magnet... have u tried aluminium?
if that does too... then you've got something amazing.. im not saying that it screwing with your appliances isnt amazing but yeah. as for what to do with it... i say take a few photos for good memories, send it off to a few labs and get it tested and ge them to inform you incase it doesn't come back. then go buy some more fish



posted on Aug, 29 2008 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by C-BuZz
 


Thank you C-Buz. I'm not sure if it is attracted to water other than landing in my pond; and I think it likes it in there because when I play with it... I get a headache. When I leave it at the bottom of the pond, I have no problems with anything weird... it just sits down there harmless I hope. Until I bring it to the college, I'll just leave it in the pond. It bothers me now that I know it is a strange acting rock/ most likely a small meteroite that is magnetic and nothing more, but odd nonetheless that I have no clue. I have no clue where it came from or why I found it in my small backyard pond... that was almost completely emptied for the first time since setting it up three years ago. I have no clue where it may have come from and nothing in my life has changed as a result other than having it. I have no new good luck or bad luck and have yet to develop any special powers as a result. The only thing I can guess is that maybe it is a small meteorite that only has a magnetic attraction and is most likely metal itself... maybe one strong enough to consistantly give me a headache when I play with it. It does not look like anything else other than a metal rock with many brilliant colors and that is very heavy to hold... I guessed 7 pounds and I could be wrong, but the darn thing won't give me a weight on my scale as it fluctuates... most likely because there is a magnet or other metals interfering. I'll keep you posted of coming tests and emails I'm waiting for that I have not done myself. Thanks for responding.



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 03:14 PM
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If you say it has bubbles coming from it when it is immersed in water,then some form of electrolysis is going on.The bubbles are hydrogen and oxygen being separated from the H2O.
Put the object in a glass jar filled with water, 3/4 full add a small amount of baking soda and see if the water bubbles.Video all your tests if possible.
Also you can weight the object by constructing a simple balance beam scale.
No springs or magnets involved.It should give you a fairly accurate weight.

[edit on 30-8-2008 by calcoastseeker]

[edit on 30-8-2008 by calcoastseeker]

[edit on 30-8-2008 by calcoastseeker]



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by calcoastseeker
 


Not necessarily, when you put one of those effervescent Aspirins in water it does not make any electrolyse and it releases bubbles.



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by LunarLooney1
 



I guessed 7 pounds and I could be wrong, but the darn thing won't give me a weight on my scale as it fluctuates... most likely because there is a magnet or other metals interfering.


Why don't you weight yourself first, then weigh yourself holding the rock? That might give you a weight on it. It's worth a try.



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 04:45 PM
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very cool rock. I found one that has a slight iron content to it when i take my metal detector over it. Never thought of trying to stick any metal on it, but mines proly nothing special other than a larger size meteorite. Strange that gold sticks to yours, is that even possible? I thought gold was non magnetic.



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Then it dissipates until it is gone. It is very heavy.It has a magnetic field.It ain't getting smaller.Pretty sure there is a electrolysis process being created.
Do some research before you post silly answers.
Google Youtube for HHO converter and learn something.
Here watch this video on youtube.
magnetic electrolysis


[edit on 30-8-2008 by calcoastseeker]



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 06:38 PM
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reply to post by LunarLooney1
 


This is fascinating. Thanks so much for sharing. I can't wait to see the college video. I showed my family your gallery of 16 pictures and one said 'See the face?' - it's in picture 9 and seems to be raised and looks part human (above nose) and part animal - almost cat-like.

When is the date for the professor's class? Sorry if you already told us this.



posted on Aug, 30 2008 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by calcoastseeker
Then it dissipates until it is gone.
If it's changing by decomposing in some other elements, like my example of the aspirin, yes, but that was just one example of things that create bubbles in water and are not electrolysis.

The most obvious (so obvious that I thought that it was not necessary to talk about it, but apparently I was wrong) is that the bubbles are air inside the rock that are expelled by the water entering the rock.


It is very heavy.It has a magnetic field.It ain't getting smaller.Pretty sure there is a electrolysis process being created.
That is the problem, now you say that you are "pretty sure", in your first post you said that "some form of electrolysis is going on", like there wasn't any other possibility, so I tried to show that there are other possibilities.

Another possibility is that there is some chemical reaction between the rock and the water, and the bubbles are the result of that reaction.


Do some research before you post silly answers.
Google Youtube for HHO converter and learn something.
Your problem is that you are too sure about what you say.

You are assuming that I did not made any research and you are assuming that I will learn something with the result of a search in YouTube about HHO converters.

PS: I know how electrolysis works, and I have known it for 30 years.



posted on Sep, 1 2008 @ 01:59 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by calcoastseeker
Then it dissipates until it is gone.
If it's changing by decomposing in some other elements, like my example of the aspirin, yes, but that was just one example of things that create bubbles in water and are not electrolysis.

The most obvious (so obvious that I thought that it was not necessary to talk about it, but apparently I was wrong) is that the bubbles are air inside the rock that are expelled by the water entering the rock.


It is very heavy.It has a magnetic field.It ain't getting smaller.Pretty sure there is a electrolysis process being created.
That is the problem, now you say that you are "pretty sure", in your first post you said that "some form of electrolysis is going on", like there wasn't any other possibility, so I tried to show that there are other possibilities.

Another possibility is that there is some chemical reaction between the rock and the water, and the bubbles are the result of that reaction.


Do some research before you post silly answers.
Google Youtube for HHO converter and learn something.
Your problem is that you are too sure about what you say.

You are assuming that I did not made any research and you are assuming that I will learn something with the result of a search in YouTube about HHO converters.

PS: I know how electrolysis works, and I have known it for 30 years.


Then put a strong magnet in water in see what happens. He has already stated that it is magnetic and very heavy in composition. if you look at the size of the object and the weight of it(even though he can't get an accurate weight, he does say it is HEAVY) I truly doubt there are air pockets.When you eliminate the obvious. Then all that is left is the logical.

The pond had water in it.Now the water is all gone, and the fish and turtle.
If this object was strongly magnetic,and I mean a super strong magnetic field from coming through the ionosphere as it plunged to earth. Once it landed in the pond the electrical/magnetic reaction to the water would have literally shocked the fish out of the water. The turtle beat feet to but came back later if I remember right.

This is a cheap way to catch fish take a cheap hand cranked generator to the lake stick a couple of wires in the water and crank.Watch the fish jump out of the water.All you have to do is catch them.

Now if this object has a strong magnetic field it could literally cause a electrolysis process to the water and it would actually break down in to two gases oxygen or hydrogen and dissipate in the atmosphere.As long as the field states strong.

He says holding the object gives him a headache.Indicative of a strong magnetic field. There was no obvious large amount of water saturating the ground around the pool as if it had been tossed out. Maybe it was hot too when it landed so some may have evaporated.

You have to use the evidence that is presented and come to a logical conclusion. Hopefully he'll have more information available.



posted on Sep, 1 2008 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by calcoastseeker
Then put a strong magnet in water in see what happens.
The water, being a diamagnetic material, could be repelled by the magnet.


He has already stated that it is magnetic and very heavy in composition. if you look at the size of the object and the weight of it(even though he can't get an accurate weight, he does say it is HEAVY) I truly doubt there are air pockets.When you eliminate the obvious. Then all that is left is the logical.
The obvious may not be superfluous, I only eliminate anything when I can get guarantees that that anything can really be eliminated.

The fact that the rocks is heavy does not imply that it has not air pockets or that it is porous inside, that volume of something like gold would weigh some 6 Kg (around 12 pounds for the metric challenged
), so it could have many holes inside it and still weigh seven pounds. And gold is not the heaviest material known to man.

But I also doubt that there are air pockets, but the fact that it is a less likely possibility does not mean that it's not a possibility, and that was what I meant, we can not make definite statements about something unknown.


The pond had water in it.Now the water is all gone, and the fish and turtle.
If this object was strongly magnetic,and I mean a super strong magnetic field from coming through the ionosphere as it plunged to earth. Once it landed in the pond the electrical/magnetic reaction to the water would have literally shocked the fish out of the water. The turtle beat feet to but came back later if I remember right.
If it was as strongly magnetic as that there was no reason to loose its magnetism, and a strong magnet is not a strong current, it only creates electrical currents in conducting materials; as water is not a conductor of electricity it would not create an electrical current on the water.

Also, nothing happened when the rock was put back in the water.


Now if this object has a strong magnetic field it could literally cause a electrolysis process to the water and it would actually break down in to two gases oxygen or hydrogen and dissipate in the atmosphere.As long as the field states strong.
Magnetic fields do not make electrolysis, electrical currents do that, that is why it is call electrolysis and not magnetolysis.


He says holding the object gives him a headache.Indicative of a strong magnetic field.
Not necessarily. First, a very strong magnetic field would not let him take the objects back from the stone, and headaches may have dozens of origins, one of the most common causes for strange headaches is a gas leak, for example, so, if the rock emits some gas it could create bubbles in the water and make him have headaches near it. It could also make animals run away from it.


There was no obvious large amount of water saturating the ground around the pool as if it had been tossed out. Maybe it was hot too when it landed so some may have evaporated.
That is why I said the most mysterious thing, to me, is the disappearance of the water.


You have to use the evidence that is presented and come to a logical conclusion. Hopefully he'll have more information available.
That is what I try to do, without ignoring any possibility, including the possibility of this being a hoax.
(I am not saying that this is a hoax, just that it is one of the possibilities)

PS: There is no need to quote the whole post if you are going to answer to everything in a block, you can just use the "REPLY TO:" button.



posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


forgive me for not using the external source tag, i didnt know how to do it, ignorant but thanks for the heads up.!! article came from www.earthfiles.com and ill be sure to post properly in the near future. peace



posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 02:43 PM
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Originally posted by calcoastseeker
If you say it has bubbles coming from it when it is immersed in water,then some form of electrolysis is going on.The bubbles are hydrogen and oxygen being separated from the H2O.
Put the object in a glass jar filled with water, 3/4 full add a small amount of baking soda and see if the water bubbles.Video all your tests if possible.
Also you can weight the object by constructing a simple balance beam scale.
No springs or magnets involved.It should give you a fairly accurate weight.

[edit on 30-8-2008 by calcoastseeker]

[edit on 30-8-2008 by calcoastseeker]

[edit on 30-8-2008 by calcoastseeker]


Doesn't putting Baking Soda in water and doing electolysis create chlorine gas? That's dangerous. If there's a chemical reaction going on, there's no need for Baking Soda. Just put two drops of dish soap on top of the water after the rock is submerged. You will get soapy bubbles. Try to light them with a grill lighter, and see if they go bang. Where eye protection and possibly ear protection, and keep your face away from the ignition point.



posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by Oreyeon
 


No putting chlorine in water creates chlorine gas.Dude,people brush their teeth with baking soda.It is an alkaloid you know like in alkaline batteries.You can use salt,baking soda lemon juice,pickle juice,vinegar. Baking soda is safe to use.Lot of people posting on this forum slept through chemistry class.

It creates HYDROGEN gas and oxygen you know, two parts hydrogen and one part oxygen H2O(water).It is only dangerous if contained in a small space and flame is induced.


Maybe it will be discussed next year when most of you attend high school.



[edit on 2-9-2008 by calcoastseeker]



posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 03:18 PM
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Originally posted by Oreyeon
Doesn't putting Baking Soda in water and doing electolysis create chlorine gas?
No.

Baking Soda does not have Chlorine, it has Sodium (as the name shows). As I do not know much about chemistry, I went to Wikipedia to see it's formula (NaHCO3) and in it you can see that it has Sodium (Na), Hydrogen (H), Carbon (C) and Oxygen (O), no Chlorine.

So, making the electrolysis of water with baking soda would release those elements (or combinations of those elements), none of which is harmful, and probably one or both electrodes will be covered with some material.

(I can not find my periodic table, it was very good and one of the things it had was the properties of the molecules of each element and their ionic properties, or something like that, the last time I used it was some 20 years ago).

Chlorine can be released if the water has salt (NaCl), in that case one of the electrodes will release the Chlorine while the other gets covered in Sodium (and I know that this is true because I tried it
)

Edit: I see I was too slow, as usual.


[edit on 2/9/2008 by ArMaP]



posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Water is not a conductor of electricity????

Maybe you should tell all those fish that get shocked out of the water when lighting strikes a lake.Or better yet go sit in a bathtub full of water and drop an electric radio in it while it is plugged in.

Maybe those brave soldiers in Iraq didn't get electrocuted while taking showers because of poorly grounded water pumps, because we all know,
Water is not a conductor of electricity????






[edit on 2-9-2008 by calcoastseeker]



posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by calcoastseeker
 


I should have said "a good conductor", because everything is a conductor.

And people are affected by electricity in environments with much water because water is a better conductor than air, but a person is an even better conductor.

And there is no need of shouting, your text is even hard to read in that way.

[edit on 2/9/2008 by ArMaP]



posted on Sep, 4 2008 @ 12:34 PM
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Ah, that's right, it's salt, not baking soda that creates chlorine gas when performing electrolysis. That is my bad.
I recall though that I was warned not to use baking soda either, because it produces something bad as a bi-product. I'll have to go back and find my notes on all of it. It's been over a year and a half since I stopped messing around with my hydrogen reactor stuff.





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