UFO in my pond

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posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 11:23 AM
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Wow man, the odds of that happening!

I've seen one smash into a farmers field near my dads place but we couldn't find it...


Apparently they are worth a pretty penny, so I wouldn't be too eager to give it away... or sell it right away without first locating a specialist in the field or something..

I don't know what people are expecting with comments like.. it just looks like a rock.. well of course.. it's not going to be super shiny or anything after-all it had to go through the atmosphere and whatnot.

Truly remarkable, I wonder if it has any other odd properties other than being magnetic, does it cause any discomfort when you hold onto it for a long period of time?

I wonder how the rock would effect the human "aura" or the field around us...

[edit on 8/27/2008 by PuRe EnErGy]




posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 11:40 AM
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WOW if that is a meteorite you are so lucky, what are the chances of
that happening? worth a fair bit as well, I'm glad your taking it to get sampled
and hope it turns out to be from out of space for you. very cool. shame about the fish tho.look foward to the rest of the story.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 12:09 PM
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Given the way this rock behaves...it does not necessarily have to magnetic. It could be electro-static, as it's attracting gold(unless you got duped when your purchased the rings).

I'm awaiting further info from you. But, I must say, this is a remarkable story.

If the geologist rules out any radioactive activity taking place...I have a hunch on what it is exactly...but I'll share that later, depending on the outcome of the study done on the rock.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by GodForbid
 


I don't know how these things are measured, but seeing people jump into the water on a pool we can see that the effect on the water is a result of the surface that hits the water, when someone hits the water with their belly they spread lots of water, when they enter the water like a professional diver the water moves just a little.

A bullet shot to water does not displace much water, despite the speed, so I think it's really a result of the surface that hits the water.

Unless it was a much larger object, and the only thing that survived was the rock. If that was the case then the rock must show signs of having been broken recently.

Evaporating does not look possible either, the rock is too small for such a volume of water, the water would cool the rock before evaporating.

And as the pond was refilled without any problem the rock did not made any crack by which the water could disappear, so to me, the biggest mystery is what happened to the water.

PS: thanks for liking my posts.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 12:27 PM
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I don't understand how a magnetic meteorite attracts GOLD which is non-ferrous. That is really odd.

Edit to add that it looks like glass is stuck to it as well. I think you have more than an "ordinary" meteorite and it may be part of, or fuel for, a ufo.

[edit on 8-27-2008 by groingrinder]



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Thanks a lot for the clarification. Definitely sounds correct to me, had mostly taken into consideration speed and weight, but I think you're correct regarding surface area being most important.

Thanks again.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 12:55 PM
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Could you define "pond" please? When I think of a "pond", I think of a fairly large body of water, i.e., somewhere between the size of a lake and a puddle. "Ponds" around here range in size from small "duck ponds" which are usually at least 100 feet across to larger natural ponds that are nearly as large as a lake. But you said:

I only have a rock that displaced about 90 gallons of water in my pond

90 gallons of water isn't much. That's like the capacity of a large hot water heater. So if losing 90 gallons of water emptied your pond, then I'm assuming your pond is very small and manmade?



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Thank you ArMap... I will do this and we will find out what type of rock... I'm not going anywhere and have been updating this post as much as possible. The humming may have been coming from a malfunctuning filter I'm not sure and I don't think anything here that happened in the pond can't be explained; and I don't think this rock is magical... just magnetic and or something else that attracts metals. I also have solar-powered lights around the pool that work okay with no problems from the rock... it just seems like the rock only interferes with stuff that is plugged in??? In any case, I'm all over this thing and hope to have some answers soon as to what type of metal this is. I had mentioned that I see gold sparkles on the rock but never said I knew for sure that it was gold... I know nothing about rocks, metals, or minerals and this is just an observation from my perspective of what it looks like. Again... thank you all for helping me and I'll return the favor with more information as I get it. As far as the pictures, the closer I get to the rock to take them the more fuzz I get and so they are not fake at all. I have a digital camera 2 years now and still don't understand all the features as I know nothing about camera's as well. But I shared with you from Kodak where I upload family pictures to be developed right from my camera... I wouldn't know how to fake taking a picture on my camera and sending it to Kodak... I'm just not familiar with the technology that can do this... I'm still trying to figure out how to get red eyeballs off my kids pictures. My son helped me put a picture next to my name on ATS as that took 3 weeks cause I'm stupid to this stuff. Moreover, my son said he can upload my video from my digital camera to this site as well when he visits this weekend because although he gave me directions, I could not do what he said I could do and told me that I was one French fry short of a Happy Meal.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 01:44 PM
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An average garden pong here in England where I'm from, would fit his description. 90 gallons doesn't sound unreasonable.

Most garden ponds are only a few feet wide and long. Maybe one or two feet deep. I don't think he's talking about a lake.

To the OP: I recommend changing the title of this thread from "UFO in my pond" to, "Strange meteor landed in my pond" or something similar. UFO isn't really a good description of what actually happened. You may get more people visiting the thread if it sounds more real, like a Meteor landing in your pond, rather than aliens in your pond, which is what the title may lead one to think.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by LunarLooney1
 


coool, looking forward to the updates,


as i said before it may be a bit of space junk or it could be a space rock, the one my dad got in norway was worth a lot of money.

snoopyuk



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:01 PM
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reply to post by MaximRecoil
 


Yes! The pond I bought from Lowes a few years ago says it's 120 gallons, it's all black and has a three foot deep section in the middle... probably only 10 feet in circumference. I think it is a standard pond as there were many on the shelf when I purchased mine... hope this helps! Moreover, I'm hearing a lot about the water vanishing but like it has been stated here, it is likely the water was blown out of the pond on impact and it evaporated before I noticed there was a problem... leaving the area looking dry. It may have been as long as two days before I noticed because I don't go to the pond every day; and it couldn't be any longer because I do visit the pond almost every other day. I also think birds got the fish and frogs when they were displaced like someone else said. The turtle found his way back and I guess he didn't go too far. For the gentelmen with the video camera that lives in PA, we can talk more and meet for ATS as well so I have more proof for you all. I'm open to anything as I have the rock and enjoy the insight. The rock is not for sale and I won't be looking for any money... it's not about that as I would much rather share the rock and story while making friends here with ATS members. Having this object, conversing with others about it and being able to go to college to have it tested is more exciting for me than to sell it and or get rid of it. I think we can all learn something here about where this stuff may have come from and that to me is way more interesting than money. I'll keep you posted all... thank you for all your help!
David



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:07 PM
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Very interesting ...thanks for sharing your story with us ..
I will be watching to see what you find out ......



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by Simplynoone
 


You are welcome... thank you for responding!



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by GodForbid
An average garden pong here in England where I'm from, would fit his description. 90 gallons doesn't sound unreasonable.

Most garden ponds are only a few feet wide and long. Maybe one or two feet deep. I don't think he's talking about a lake.



Originally posted by LunarLooney1
reply to post by MaximRecoil
 


Yes! The pond I bought from Lowes a few years ago says it's 120 gallons, it's all black and has a three foot deep section in the middle... probably only 10 feet in circumference. I think it is a standard pond as there were many on the shelf when I purchased mine... hope this helps!


Okay, that must be a regional thing then. We use the word "pond" differently around here. It is not something you buy, it is something that is natural or something you dig in the ground with a backhoe. Thanks for the clarification.



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:17 PM
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Looking at the photo of objects attracted to the stone, I noted that several things not normally magnetic are depicted as attracted.



Curious.

Looking forward to seeing the video of the analysis.

Thanks for posting.

Edit: (I tested my car keys and none of them are magnetic. Those screws are usually not magnetic, either (zinc?))




[edit on 27-8-2008 by Badge01]



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:19 PM
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reply to post by MaximRecoil
 


I understand. Went down south to order a pizza pie and just said pie... almost had me an apple pie with pepperoni on it



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:26 PM
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the bubbles that are produced by the rock while it is in the pond are due to a chemical reaction of some type but im not sure which. my guess is that it is caused by magnesium.

the possibility that what we are seeing is only the membrane to a more mysterious rock underneath could hold weight.

if your looking to find someone who could really help point you in the right direction. contact linda moulton howe at www.earthfiles.com shes world renouned and im sure you would get her attention.

congrats!



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:29 PM
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Lunar. I've notread your story yet mate... to be honest, I don't know if I will.

The thing is, it is very an extremely uninviting script. I'm sure you would get much more viewers if you would just add structure and paragraph to your writing.
It just makes it so much easier for us to read and I'm sure that is what you want.

Sorry not to be replying to your story. If I do read it, I will be sure to.

I hope you understand. By our nature, we are lazy (none more than me) and it would just be such a help if this was easier to read. I mean no disrespect, I only say this because I'm sure you want as many to read this as possible and there will be many who just think "ohh I can't be arsed reading all that!", just like I did


All the best



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by Badge01
Looking at the photo of objects attracted to the stone, I noted that several things not normally magnetic are depicted as attracted.

Curious.

Looking forward to seeing the video of the analysis.

Thanks for posting.

Edit: (I tested my car keys and none of them are magnetic. Those screws are usually not magnetic, either (zinc?))

I'm interested in what exactly is being attracted to that rock as well. For example, is that ring made of a solid gold alloy? If so, it certainly shouldn't be attracted to a magnet, being non-ferrous and all.

I have at least one key that is magnetic (a chrome-plated steel Nintendo key to an old Nintendo-manufactured coin-op arcade machine). However, most keys are not, as they are often made of "pot metal" or brass.

Most screws are magnetic, especially the type which is in that picture, which looks like a sheetrock or deck screw.

BTW, the thing you labeled as possibly being a piece of glass looks like a clear plastic thumb tack to me, in which case, the needle part would be attracted to a magnet.

If that rock is really attracting non-ferrous materials, then it is like the "magnetism" that the "crystal skulls" displayed in the new Indiana Jones movie, which I scoffed at.

[edit on 8/27/2008 by MaximRecoil]



posted on Aug, 27 2008 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by MaximRecoil
 


Thanks for your insight; that's clearly a plastic stick pin, now that you mention it, and the pin would be magnetic.

Most screws like the ones shown are probably magnetic - I just tested a few, so correction on that.

I tried a number of car keys and none of mine are magnetic nor is my wedding ring.

Thanks for the clarification.





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