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Asteroid 2007 TU24 has NASA concerned.

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posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by ats1629

www.space.com...



Nobody knows why Holmes erupted, but it underwent a similar explosive brightening in 1892. The recent display, which began Oct. 24, brought the comet from visual obscurity to being one of the brighter objects in the night sky. It has since dimmed somewhat as the material races outward from the nucleus at roughly 1,100 mph (0.5 km/sec).




lol. space.com=disinfo. They are the same ones that say "we have no idea what jupiters black dot was in fall 2003..." Hmm... didn't Galileo crash into jupiter in that same spot a month earlier, carrying more plutonium than the Hiroshima bomb?

(kinda like Cassini will do to Saturn this summer. google lucifer project)



[edit on 20-1-2008 by aaaauroraaaaa]




posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:05 PM
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Gladstone observatory:

DSS-14

Will be down from Jan. 25th - Feb. 15th... (During the most significant trajectory episode)

Reading their stats was kind of interesting to me as they speak about the known asteroid impact slated for 2029 , yet TU24 not being discovered until Oct. 22nd 2008.

Also they give the dates that Aricebo will be viewing, but that on the projected possible impact dates it will be too far North for them to view. I wonder if they will be going down for repairs too?



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:05 PM
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Just in case people forgot (or don't know), this is not expected to hit the Earth or even the Moon, it's expected to pass outside the Earth-Moon system (if we can call it a system).



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:06 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Yes it is expected to pass the moon, supposedly by .20 AU (or .0020 AU?).

However, the projected trajectory can differ from the actual trajectory, can it not?

We don't know where this thing is going for sure so why not keep an eye on it?



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:10 PM
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Just wondering, could a chunk of this be what was expected to hit Mars? Same group or something?



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by antar
Gladstone observatory:

DSS-14

Will be down from Jan. 25th - Feb. 15th... (During the most significant trajectory episode)


happen to have a link? I can't find "gladstone observatory" or DSS-14 using google.

Oh wait- it's goldstone observatory

Wiki has "mars" in parentheses under it.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by aaaauroraaaaa
 


Thankyou! I needed that as I found the link by accident and then when I went to do the link I had lost it! Excellent!

echo.jpl.nasa.gov...

I did not find it through wikipedia, but that link you provide is very informative.

[edit on 20-1-2008 by antar]



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:37 PM
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Well since we're talking about Earth's supposed cataclysm, thought that you all would like to see what Earth would be like after humanity is extinguished. sleep well! LifeAfterPeople-HistoryChannel



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:38 PM
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reply to post by antar
 


Gladstone!

They did some very high quality reprints of the classic Disney comics, until Disney got greedy under Eisner and pulled the plug.

Ahhh, the good old days...


on topic/

Weird how an observatory would be off-line during such an, if nothing else, interesting occurrence, don't you think?

Maybe they'll be hiding in the basement 'til it's all over...



Edit to add:

Wait maybe I missed something while I was reminiscing about the good old days:


Goldstone may be offline for maintenance from September 28, 2009 to March 28, 2010.
Source | Goldstone Asteroid Schedule

[edit on 20-1-2008 by goosdawg]



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:38 PM
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Originally posted by aaaauroraaaaa

Originally posted by antar
Gladstone observatory:

DSS-14

Will be down from Jan. 25th - Feb. 15th... (During the most significant trajectory episode)


happen to have a link? I can't find "gladstone observatory" or DSS-14 using google.

Oh wait- it's goldstone observatory

Wiki has "mars" in parentheses under it.
en.wikipedia.org...


i still can't see where the info that the DSS-14 will be down those dates lol.



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by antar
 



Apart from its absolute visual magnitude (H = 20.1, implying a
diameter ~0.3 km if it has a typical S-class albedo), nothing is known
about TU24's physical properties...


Thanks for that link, antar. Answered one of my questions.
I guess the scientists on this case know as much about the physical properties of TU24 as I do. Doesn't even seem as if they are certain about its size either. Hmm...



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by Springheel Jack
 


I wouldn't be too worried about the destruction of Earth.

If it happens we have no control over it anyway, so why worry.

I think we should be aware though of things coming towards us, regardless if we can influence them or not.

Let's just hope it misses us.



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:51 PM
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Please correct my math if I am wrong, but:

One AU = 93 million miles

Additional Information Earth MOID = .0012501 AU
Description: Earth MOID (Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance)




the distance percieved on the 29th = 116,259.3 miles


The mean distance between the earth and the moon

Mean 384,400 km = 240000 miles

This would mean that the intersection of the object to us, would actually be it passing between the earth and the moon, or if the moon is on the opposite side, the increase gravitational pull from the moon, and the earth, could alter the MOID?

I'm not an expert, but there has got to be a formula for a given mass of an object, whether or not it can impact other masses around it. Additionally, if the trajectory is modified what degree of modification are we talking, and at what speed. The slower the object is going the more time gravitional pull has to work on its trajectory.

Just some thoughts. I'm not saying its going to hit, but I definately think we should be able to see it, when it gets that close.

Cheers,

Camain



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by biggie smalls
reply to post by Springheel Jack
 


Let's just hope it misses us.


That has been agreed upon.

I'm more hoping it misses our magnetosphere.



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 07:56 PM
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Hey great work everyone!

I hope no one else posted this question, but is it possible for this thing to be caught by Earth's gravity?

And if so, how would that effect us?

Would the Earth be in serious trouble then?



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 08:10 PM
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I went and searched on the Nasa.gov site for TU24. To my surprise it didn't have anything, no results were found. If you see this video- TU24 and stop it at 27 seconds, you'll clearly see a Nasa.gov url. I copied it and attempted to go to the site. It gave me an error page and told me to search it on the site. What's going on here? I think they're trying to hide something from us...



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 08:13 PM
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reply to post by mungodave
 


Don't worry about asteroids hitting anything.
They are very easy to move around.
They grays can move them around with ease.
MJ-12 can also move them around with the starfleet we now have
thanks to all those Star Wars dollars spent a long time ago.



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by spidy
I went and searched on the Nasa.gov site for TU24. To my surprise it didn't have anything, no results were found. If you see this video- TU24 and stop it at 27 seconds, you'll clearly see a Nasa.gov url. I copied it and attempted to go to the site. It gave me an error page and told me to search it on the site. What's going on here? I think they're trying to hide something from us...


you mean this link?


Originally posted by antar
reply to post by aaaauroraaaaa
 


Thankyou! I needed that as I found the link by accident and then when I went to do the link I had lost it! Excellent!

echo.jpl.nasa.gov...

[edit on 20-1-2008 by antar]



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 08:26 PM
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Originally posted by spidy
I went and searched on the Nasa.gov site for TU24. To my surprise it didn't have anything, no results were found. If you see this video- TU24 and stop it at 27 seconds, you'll clearly see a Nasa.gov url. I copied it and attempted to go to the site. It gave me an error page and told me to search it on the site. What's going on here? I think they're trying to hide something from us...


I guess this needs to be added every page

ssd.jpl.nasa.gov...

You know what? People who are experts have done the calculations and determined that this will not hit us. Check the link.


The magnetosphere/plasma thing is different and that I am not buying into one bit. Show me some data of a historical occurance of any magnitude.



posted on Jan, 20 2008 @ 08:38 PM
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whoops sorry about that, i copied the link the wrong way. Sorry about that guys

Cheers...
Spidy...




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