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Trump Scraps Obama-Era Rules For Energy Efficient Bulbs

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posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 02:55 AM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

I wouldn't worry about that microwave. LEDs are quite resilient and it will probably outlast the oven emitters.

The main reason they went to LEDs is cost. When LED bulb technology advanced, cost went down for all LEDs. In a low-power configuration, they're cheaper than an incandescent bulb now and can use regulators that are smaller and cheaper than those needed to power an incandescent.

TheRedneck




posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: gortex



Cancer.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:02 AM
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a reply to: Phage

He truly is the font of all knowledge.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:03 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Plus you don't have to change them nearly as often.
I have some fixtures I need a ladder for. Those were the first to be upgraded.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:04 AM
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originally posted by: BrianFlanders
Don't know so much about this one. The CFL bulbs were horrible and it took a while for LED bulbs to not suck. But the newest LED bulbs I've bought are great.I started installing LED bulbs about 5 years ago and now have them in almost every fixture. The only ones that have failed have been the ones in enclosed fixtures. Which is to be expected, since they don't like excessive heat. I have enjoyed not having to replace light bulbs all the time.

I bought all the LED bulbs I have dirt cheap. Many of them were from the dollar store (2 in a pack).

This is not a good change.


It sounds like a great change , you like your bulb keep your bulb.

No need to have govt force the people to buy a better product , let the consumer decide what is better for them

I bet many will continue to buy led, i likely will
edit on 06930America/ChicagoSat, 07 Sep 2019 03:06:46 -0500000000p3042 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: Phage


Never? I want lead in my paint, dammit!

Knock yerself out

Lead, when ingested, has serious health issues and children have a tendency to eat paint chips. It is a public health issue. There is no public health issue with incandescent bulbs. Let me know when children start eating light bulbs.


Do halogens get warm enough for chicks?

Too warm. Plus, I have standard bulb sockets already with the parabolic reflectors and spring-loaded clips. I would have to buy new fixtures to use halogen bulbs.

It's not like I raise chicks 12 months out of the year. We usually get new ones every two or three years and they spend a month inside, about half of it under the heat lamp. Then it's outside to the coop, and finally they get turned loose at maturity.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:08 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: TheRedneck

Plus you don't have to change them nearly as often.
I have some fixtures I need a ladder for. Those were the first to be upgraded.


Ever have a lamp with an incandescent bulb that you accidentally plug in while it's switched on? Bulb goes "pop" and is done for. The new kind are fine. They cost more, last longer, are more energy efficient, AND more forgiving of mistakes. Hell, you can drop them!

Thank god we will still be able to buy the energy-sucking, shorter-lived bulbs of yesteryear! Praise be!



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:13 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




Let me know when children start eating light bulbs.



I misunderstood. I thought it was a free market issue.
Energy consumption is a public health issue. More energy, more coal. And with reduced air quality standards, even more coal. And more health issues.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:13 AM
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a reply to: Phage

That's what I did. Difficult to get to areas and high usage areas first, then worked out from there.

It's made a big difference in my shop. I have 12 60W bulbs on the main switch, plus two more auxiliary lights front and rear, two more in a track fixture over my workbench, and six lower-wattage bulbs in the storage area above. Plus the two outside fixtures. That thing could spin a meter off the base when I turned them all on with incandescents.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:16 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: BrianFlanders

I wouldn't worry about that microwave. LEDs are quite resilient and it will probably outlast the oven emitters.

The main reason they went to LEDs is cost. When LED bulb technology advanced, cost went down for all LEDs. In a low-power configuration, they're cheaper than an incandescent bulb now and can use regulators that are smaller and cheaper than those needed to power an incandescent.

TheRedneck


Well, I do worry about it because I don't want to buy a new microwave because the light bulb went out (replacing a bulb in an $80 microwave is more risky and more hassle than I'm willing to venture and I am not gonna live with a microwave that doesn't have a light in it so). The simple fact of the matter is that if you look at reviews on Amazon for the Toshiba microwaves that have LED bulbs, the weakest link of them seems to be the LED bulb. I saw quite a few reviews that said the bulb died in a matter of months.

My last microwave had an incandescent bulb in it and so did every one before it. Never lost a bulb in a microwave and I always kept the microwave until something went wrong with it. I have had microwaves last many years (and they used to last longer than they do now). I have seen 15 year old microwaves with working bulbs. I'll bet this one doesn't last that long. Which, OK. It's (like I said) a cheap microwave. They were cheap before they had LED bulbs in them. One more thing to go wrong, IMO. Untested technology in rough service application (Water, heat, vibration, high voltage, etc).
edit on 7-9-2019 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:19 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

The color of the LEDs took a bit of adjusting to but it's way better than mercury.

My house is so old that I had a light trough with these in it. The color was great but the parts just got harder and harder to find. Just as well, the ex replaced them all with flourescents. They'll become LEDs before too much longer.

www.lightbulbs.com...

edit on 9/7/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:19 AM
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Something to think about under the law of unintended consequences.

Energy providers have been aggressively rebating LED's with downstream programs making them much more cost-approachable for the end user, this is to mitigate the fact that they are typically unable to easily increase capacity for their grids. Using inefficient lamps like incandescent means the grid is taxed more than it should be which only means the end user deals with the ramifications.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:21 AM
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a reply to: Phage


I misunderstood. I thought it was a free market issue.

It is.


Energy consumption is a public health issue. More energy, more coal. And with reduced air quality standards, even more coal. And more health issues.

I reject that argument. There is as of yet no reliable scientific data that says deaths have been caused by Global Warming due to additional energy consumption. Only fear mongering and misinterpretations of the science. It is not necessary to inflate claims about environmental effects in order to promote what is already an inherently better product.

More energy does not always equal more coal. Our energy is nuclear.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:23 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




I reject that argument.
I'm not surprised.


There is as of yet no reliable scientific data that says deaths have been caused by Global Warming
Hard to say. But I didn't say a word about global warming.



More energy does not always equal more coal. Our energy is nuclear.
Then air quality standards don't apply to you as far as electricity goes.

edit on 9/7/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:29 AM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

Well, it's your prerogative to worry if you want, but I have LEDs here I purchased in the 1970s and they still work. I figure I will likely never have to buy another light bulb in my lifetime now, barring physical damage of course. I will probably have to buy at least two more microwaves, assuming I don't become the face of old age for refusing to die when I should.

I do tend to have a stubborn streak when it comes to that.


TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:34 AM
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a reply to: Phage


The color of the LEDs took a bit of adjusting to but it's way better than mercury.

Look for warm white bulbs instead of daylight. They more closely duplicate the frequency spectrum of incandescents. Just based on looking while I walk through the store aisles, I think the majority of newer bulbs are warm white light. Earlier versions were not as warm in color.

Not sure if that will apply to the bulbs you need. That sounds like beautiful lighting, but I do imagine it limits the choices for bulbs as well. Hopefully you can find warm white Lumiline bulbs.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:41 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

Something to think about under the law of unintended consequences.

Energy providers have been aggressively rebating LED's with downstream programs making them much more cost-approachable for the end user, this is to mitigate the fact that they are typically unable to easily increase capacity for their grids. Using inefficient lamps like incandescent means the grid is taxed more than it should be which only means the end user deals with the ramifications.


Also, incandescent are inefficient because they produce at least as much heat as they do light. Even when you don't need more heat. Such as when it's hot outside and you want to stay cool. So you might bump your AC up a couple of notches to offset the heat all your light bulbs are producing. It's another way of saying that most of the power an incandescent uses is wasted as heat. On top of the extra AC, an average home might have had 10-20 100 watt bulbs running at one time. There was a push to get people to accept 60 watts but that just ended up with the necessity of having two sockets in one fixture, which went to 120 watts per fixture. And then ended up with people upgrading to those 500 watt halogen floor lamps. And even that was just adequate for a normal sized room if you wanted good light. And of course, those things produced A LOT of heat.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 03:42 AM
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a reply to: Phage


But I didn't say a word about global warming.

Oh, you were referring to direct particulate pollution? My bad if so.


Then air quality standards don't apply to you as far as electricity goes.

Seems strange to me that Hawaii is not using nuclear as well. I would imagine the logistics of shipping in coal are pretty burdensome.

Most of the power in this area of the country is hydro. We then have nuclear that covers what hydro can't supply. There are still a few coal plants used for backup, but they are being decommissioned pretty quickly now. Ours was decommissioned after the April 2011 tornadoes tore it up.

Wave energy should be coming online soon as a commercially practical solution. It won't affect me, but your state would greatly benefit from it.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 04:04 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: BrianFlanders

Well, it's your prerogative to worry if you want, but I have LEDs here I purchased in the 1970s and they still work. I figure I will likely never have to buy another light bulb in my lifetime now, barring physical damage of course. I will probably have to buy at least two more microwaves, assuming I don't become the face of old age for refusing to die when I should.

I do tend to have a stubborn streak when it comes to that.


TheRedneck


I just think they should wait until the technology is more mature before they start cramming them into everything. I have no issues with putting LEDs in my bedroom lamp. They're cheap enough now to be replaced without it stinging too much (I bought a two pack of 100 watt equiv at Dollar Tree for (guess) a dollar recently). I love them for easily serviceable fixtures and won't be going back unless the prices go back up.

The one inside my microwave doesn't want to be replaced, as evidenced by the fact that the case of the microwave is screwed together every which way and even has a couple of special screws to make sure monkeys like me don't take it apart and electrocute themselves in the process. I don't like that. I could have bought one with a normal bulb in it but I just didn't notice it. It wasn't what I was looking for. I needed a cheap microwave that wasn't an Oster (have had a couple of those and they're OK but built as cheap as they are) and there it was.

So they did it just to put that "LED LIGHT!" on the box of an $80 microwave as a feature. I'm sure they still have access to cheap incandescent appliance bulbs if they wanted them. It was just a goofy choice which will probably end up costing them a lot in warranty claims. Assuming the people who buy them don't just throw them in the trash when the light goes out in a couple of years or less. These days it seems like it's easier to just throw things away than try to deal with the warranty process. Doesn't matter what it says on the box. If you need to return it, you will pay for the shipping. Which is crazy expensive for anything that weighs more than a few ounces. And that's if you can get them to admit their product is a piece of junk that failed because it's a piece of junk and not try to blame you.

We'll see. I've had it less than a month and the light still works. I'm not an electrical expert but I'm not a complete dummy either. I have lost a few LED bulbs. The ones I lost died due to excessive heat buildup in an enclosed fixture. And no. I didn't put them in there thinking they'd last forever. I knew the heat would kill them faster. Which is why I used dollar store LED bulbs and didn't spend $20 on a 4 pack of GE LEDs (which would have probably died even faster in that application). They're great for open fixtures. They're not so awesome when they're built into an appliance that isn't meant to be taken apart.

edit on 7-9-2019 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

LEDs were one of the earlier inventions in semiconductors, coming along just after diodes and transistors. Essentially, they are just a diode with a clear place for light to escape.

The heat issue is the main problem. LEDs can't take excessive internal heat; no diode can. External heat is a different animal... it takes time for external heat to get to the junction where the damage can occur. A diode junction is essentially opaque glass (in the case of a silicon diode, and the LED is very similar in that respect), and you should know how well glass insulates.

We've come a long long way in handling heat. Another poster pointed out that the LED bulb is more than just LEDs... it contains a power supply in a tightly controlled fixture which is why there was so much trouble with heat dissipation. That's for a LED matrix which is pumping out 8-12 watts of heat. The one in your microwave is creating less than a watt, which is much easier to deal with, and is not sitting on top of its power supply. The power supply is on the main circuit board.

If you run that microwave for 15 minutes straight, you might be pushing the heat dissipation envelope, but that is abuse of the appliance. Microwave ovens are not really designed to do that, especially not the cheap ones. You'll still likely burn out the microwave emitters long before you can fry that LED though. You might be surprised to learn that integrated circuits are literally supposed to be cooked before use. It's not an absolute requirement for most, but the more tightly packed chips come from the factory with desiccant and a moisture indicator. If that moisture indicator shows excessive moisture upon opening, the instructions are to cook the chip (which can be done in a microwave) for a specific time to remove any potential moisture.

I think once you get used to it, you'll wind up liking the LED. It is much more resilient to external heat than an incandescent bulb.

TheRedneck




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