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Trump Scraps Obama-Era Rules For Energy Efficient Bulbs

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posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: BrianFlanders

originally posted by: LordAhriman
What a win. Pssst... incandescent bulbs were never taken off the market. LEDs are just better in every possible way.


They weren't but it was highly frowned upon to sell (for example) a 100 watt incandescent bulb. They were nowhere to be found in my local stores. Not that I was interested in buying them anyway. I was just curious as to whether or not they were still being sold. And they weren't. I found decorative incandescent bulbs, appliance bulbs and (I think) 55 watt halogen bulbs maybe by Sylvania that failed very rapidly.


Every hardware and auto parts store carries Rough Service brand incandescent bulbs. If you have a dealer account with the auto parts store, they're about a buck a pair.




posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: interupt42

Lets put lead back in paint and gasoline too. Let everybody have a choice.
Pica in kids. Pollution in the air.
As long as choice is not inhibited.


Just because you aren't smart enough to keep your kids from eating and licking a lightbulb ,don't assume the rest of us will do the same.

Of course that's the problem with the crazy left they have to always go full retard on such matter , such as your comment.

Here is an idea how about we let people continue to buy lightbulbs like they have for centuries that have no consequences like your irelevent lead comparison.

However if the consumer is stupid enough to buy lead products to eat than let them and let Darwin take it's course same with cigs .

Of course I see your concern as it would likely kill 95% of Democrat party since they apparently don't have the ability to take care of themseve or logically think for themselves.


edit on 55930America/ChicagoSat, 07 Sep 2019 13:55:11 -0500000000p3042 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 12:43 PM
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I'm for choice. I like to use both for a number of reasons. I worry about what I'm consistently coming across as per the dangers of led lighting. So, for those who aren't aware, here you go.

The blue light that leds give off can lead to:
- retina destruction
- cataracts
- eye strain
- poor sleep
- amplifies issues for autistic people
- skin photosensitivity causing burns by led bulbs

Incandescent lamps are used to:
- keep baby chicks warm, and to heat coops in winter for adult birds
- one light bulb in a garage will keep plant bulbs alive during overwintering
- led bulbs on traffic lights do not melt the build up of snow in winter causing dangerous driving

Sources:
opto.ca...
www.health.harvard.edu...
www.theraspecs.com...
copublications.greenfacts.org...
www.cbc.ca...
edit on 7-9-2019 by hiddeninsite because: (no reason given)


edit on 7-9-2019 by hiddeninsite because: added a link



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 12:46 PM
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originally posted by: interupt42
Of course I see your concern as it would likely kill 95% of Democrat party since they apparently don't have the ability to take care of themseve or logically think for themselves.


Feature not bug.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: LordAhriman

originally posted by: BrianFlanders

originally posted by: LordAhriman
What a win. Pssst... incandescent bulbs were never taken off the market. LEDs are just better in every possible way.


They weren't but it was highly frowned upon to sell (for example) a 100 watt incandescent bulb. They were nowhere to be found in my local stores. Not that I was interested in buying them anyway. I was just curious as to whether or not they were still being sold. And they weren't. I found decorative incandescent bulbs, appliance bulbs and (I think) 55 watt halogen bulbs maybe by Sylvania that failed very rapidly.


Every hardware and auto parts store carries Rough Service brand incandescent bulbs. If you have a dealer account with the auto parts store, they're about a buck a pair.


OK. The point is those were a loophole and incandescent bulbs all but disappeared from regular stores. They would have (probably will still) eventually be gone. Not that I care much. As I believe they have limited usefulness now. It's frankly dumb to go out of your way to use incandescent bulbs to light your whole house unless you're just doing it in protest.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: hiddeninsite
The blue light that leds give off can lead to:

LED light bulbs do not really give off blue light, only if the maker wants them to.

The most recent ANSES study shows that LED light bulbs with colour temperatures between 2700 K and 4000 K are as harmful as incandescents. The problem appears with colours above 4000 K, specially whit smart phones, that go up to 7000 K, producing very high amounts of blue light.

The light bulbs on my home vary from 2700 K to 6700 K, this last one being a CFL light bulbs, not an LED.

So, when buying, you just have to look at the colour temperature of the light bulb.

PS: personally, I prefer whiter (with more blue) light, so I have a 4000 K on my room. The ones on the living room are 3000 K ones.

Edit: I forgot the link to the ANSES opinion.
edit on 7/9/2019 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

Thank you! It took me a long time to understand (being math challenged) the different between watts and lumens, so this is another avenue I must learn about. Appreciated.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: hiddeninsite

While all that's true, what you are missing is spectrum. It's not the leds.
You can get other bulbs to do this if they are in the wrong spectrum too.
Aquarium and hvac lights will burn your retinas out fast.

You start to get too high up into the blue spectrum the nasty stuff starts.
Stick to the warm spectrums for homes, etc...

Interesting fact on the traffic lights, thanks


edit on 9 by Mandroid7 because: Added2



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: hiddeninsite

It can get pretty complicated. I'll see if I can simplify for you.

A Watt is a measure of power (energy per unit time). In the context of electrical lights, it refers to electricity used.

Radiant flux is a measure of how much EM energy is produced per unit time, across all wavelengths. It is an exact value like a Watt, but is not used much.

A candela is total visible EM energy produced per unit of time. The difference between EM energy and visible EM energy is that the visible measurement takes into account how the average eye perceives different colors. For instance, we actually don't see green very well, but we see blue extremely well. That's why you can be surrounded by green grass and it feels peaceful, but a flashing blue light can be literally painful. There is an algorithm that is used to determine visible power, but it you try to understand it you are either math-obsessed (like me) or a masochist.

A lumen is candela per steradian, which is nothing more than how much light is produced in a certain area of the bulb. There are 4π steradians in a solid sphere, so lumens are really a measure of brightness and are used to rate light bulbs. Think of it as a measure of how concentrated the light is. It takes a small amount of light concentrated to only make a point of light, but much more to light an entire room.

Color temperature gets really wonky. Theoretically, it is the temperature a black body would need to be at to emit the same light of the same spectrum. Of course, there really is no such temperature, because a light bulb produces a different spectrum than a black body at any temperature; the closest match based on maximum wavelength produced is used. Essentially, you can think of it as a rough estimate of how short the most prominent wavelengths are... very short wavelengths like blue light have a high color temperature, while longer wavelengths like green or yellow light have a lower color temperature.

Simply put, lumens say how bright the bulb will be; watts say how much power it will use; color temperature says how much blue light it includes.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

Thank you!! So appreciated.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 05:09 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Thank you!!

I really appreciate all the replies to help me understand more. And, I have a new respect for leds as a result - not the bad beast I thought they were. Always good to learn new things.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: hiddeninsite

No problem.

I'm the first to worry about new technology, probably because technology is what I do. Many new technologies are dangerous or have issues... but LEDs are not among them. Capacitors contain some pretty nasty chemicals as electrolytes, resistors can easily overheat (that's kinda what they're for, to regulate/dissipate power) and produce fumes, but I don't think there is anything safer in electronics than the humble Light-Emitting Diode.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 08:25 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck


For most purposes, LEDs are superior to incandescent... lower energy cost, less extra heat, good quality light, extremely long life... but the government should not be dictating what someone buys. Market forces will keep LEDs relevant. Heck, I would have changed over to LED just as soon had the ban on incandescents not been implemented. It was price that held me off so long, not "environmental consciousness."

LEDs are just no good for warming baby chicks.

a reply to: TheScale

Not sure why you've had such bad luck. You might want to look into your power lines. It sounds like you are getting some spikes or something that shouldn't be there. I have had to replace one LED since I started the switchover 4-5 years ago. That was a problem with the bulb overheating, and it still worked for a long time even after it became apparent to me that it was going to have to be replaced.

TheRedneck


I have to agree with you there, I too changed over a few years ago, and have had one overheating failure in the warm light bayonet series..it simply went off after a few minutes after switching on..while once cooled it would light up after another switch on, and two with the halogen type connection, of which were both Asda...aka Walmart, based products.
Halogens were a total arse, not only did they not last, the heat...which equals high energy consumption, had a habit of burning the delivery systems themselves, especially the stepped-down transformer ones, of which I scrapped ages ago.

I don't think any research has yet to demonise LED warm lights in the range of the 40 watt equivalent which is perfectly adequate in most domestic apps, while the coolness is a boon to consumption, and beats Halogen and the incandescence's to death in longevity...which is a stated 15/25 years based on a general usage figure.
As for those twirly long lived jobs someone mentioned...CFL's, while they do last a bit longer, you will have fun trying to remove the carcass of one that has died, since they disintegrate once you touch them, and they do contain Mercury, unlike the LED's.
edit on 7-9-2019 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 09:10 PM
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originally posted by: hiddeninsite
a reply to: TheRedneck

Thank you!!

I really appreciate all the replies to help me understand more. And, I have a new respect for leds as a result - not the bad beast I thought they were. Always good to learn new things.


They are not perfect as yet, they do have other content that is not so good, lead, arsenic is there, and all the lessons are not yet learned, or not been implemented...it's just that manufacturers tend to utilise in their products...pretty much like how the rest of us get on board with new stuff.
In other words, there is no law against it

edit on 7-9-2019 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck
Where do Einsteins fit in? I can't wrap my head around it, or know if it's relevant.



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

Wow, where did you dig that one up? I haven't heard of using Einsteins in years... and even then they were a useless metric.

An Einstein is a mole of photons (6.022 x 10^23 photons). The thing is, we already have the mole unit so the Einstein is not needed. Also, all photons are not created equal. Their wavelength determines their visibility as well as their energy. It's like taking a room full of basketballs, soccer balls, footballs, marbles, golf balls, tennis balls, and softballs and saying I have x units of balls. It means nothing, because all the balls are different.

So yeah, useless metric... ignore it. It's meaningless (unless you're into trivia).

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 10:27 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: vonclod

Wow, where did you dig that one up? I haven't heard of using Einsteins in years... and even then they were a useless metric.

An Einstein is a mole of photons (6.022 x 10^23 photons). The thing is, we already have the mole unit so the Einstein is not needed. Also, all photons are not created equal. Their wavelength determines their visibility as well as their energy. It's like taking a room full of basketballs, soccer balls, footballs, marbles, golf balls, tennis balls, and softballs and saying I have x units of balls. It means nothing, because all the balls are different.

So yeah, useless metric... ignore it. It's meaningless (unless you're into trivia).

TheRedneck

Ok, thank you kindly for that!

We have been experimenting with different high intensity lighting at work, CMH, HPS, LED. At one point, probably years ago, someone had mentioned a measurement unit of Einsteins, I never could find that listed or if it could be relevant.

I do like trivia!


Cheers
edit on 7-9-2019 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 10:35 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

You definitely found trivia.


If you're ever on a game show and they have a question about Einsteins that cause you to win, remember the old redneck on ATS...

Cause you'll owe me!


TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Will do my friend..I was always good at Trivial Pursuit, I'm full of useless facts!


edit on 7-9-2019 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2019 @ 11:05 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

the newer bulbs are alot more reliable but the early generations just sucked in many ways. large arrays where whole rows would drop out and even if they were made for outdoor use they would die due to moisture issues. many just had very poor drivers with cheap capacitors that would blow out. luckily that is far less of an issue today since theyve improved so much. you can still lose the doped layer on outdoor leds if the sun happens to shine on it regularly. that takes years though.



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