It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Tehran - Mega Capital of Iran - Photo Album (Bush doesn't want you to see this side of Iran!)

page: 6
0
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 02:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by Siroos
Even if Iran sits on a sea of oil, it's not unreasonable to want a cheaper and much more environmentially friendly energy source, and besides it would enable Iran to use its oil for industry and export instead. Besides, the oil will not last forever, and every country needs to find alternative energy sources for the future.



Do you honestly believe the trash that you are coming out with or have you just been living in the dark?
The modernised world has discovered that nuclear power contains none of the glorious elements that you bestow upon it and is actually winding down it's nuclear programs. They are looking for alternative energy sources elsewhere.

"An environmentally friendly energy source"? You're kidding me right? Ever heard of Chernobyl? Ever heard about the problems involved in the recycling or storage of nuclear waste? France might have helped kickstart the Iranian nuclear program back when the dangers of nuclear power weren't fully understood, but that doesn't justify it now.
Nuclear power won't be bringing Iran forward. It will be dragging it back into the last century.




posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 02:50 PM
link   

Originally posted by Leveller
Siroos. How about answering the questions that were put to you instead of just posting more photographs?

My question. Why were 649 under-14 girls arrested in this utopian capital city?

www.iranfocus.com...


I have never claimed that Tehran was a utopian city. Tehran is just like other huge metropolises plagued with crime, prostitution, homelessness, runaway-children, etc. And it's a shame. But why is it that the U.S. always wants to focus their attention towards other societies and what's wrong in those socieities? There is SO INCREDIBLY MUCH wrong with U.S. society - but do you see other countries butting in and telling the U.S. what to do about it, or invading or bombing the U.S.? I suggest that the U.S. takes a serious look at itself before critisizing other countries because there is so much injustice, poverty, crimes, brutal forms of death penalty, sentencing of innocent people, social problems of all sort, and the list can go on forever! What right has the U.S. to interfere in Iran's internal affairs? Iran belongs to the Iranian people, and any change of regime in Tehran will be up to the Iranian people, the way it should be, and the way it was before certain sick elements in the U.S. arranged 9/11 so that they could use it as an excuse to pursue their wildest school-boy time dreams around the globe. Iran is far from perfect and has a lot of problems, but it's entirely up to us Iranians to deal with that.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 02:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by Siroos
Iran belongs to the Iranian people, and any change of regime in Tehran will be up to the Iranian people, the way it should be, and the way it was before....


Now that's just surreal.




posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 02:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by Siroos

Originally posted by Leveller
Siroos. How about answering the questions that were put to you instead of just posting more photographs?

My question. Why were 649 under-14 girls arrested in this utopian capital city?

www.iranfocus.com...


I have never claimed that Tehran was a utopian city. Tehran is just like other huge metropolises plagued with crime, prostitution, homelessness, runaway-children, etc. And it's a shame. But why is it that the U.S. always wants to focus their attention towards other societies and what's wrong in those socieities? There is SO INCREDIBLY MUCH wrong with U.S. society - but do you see other countries butting in and telling the U.S. what to do about it, or invading or bombing the U.S.? I suggest that the U.S. takes a serious look at itself before critisizing other countries because there is so much injustice, poverty, crimes, brutal forms of death penalty, sentencing of innocent people, social problems of all sort, and the list can go on forever! What right has the U.S. to interfere in Iran's internal affairs? Iran belongs to the Iranian people, and any change of regime in Tehran will be up to the Iranian people, the way it should be, and the way it was before certain sick elements in the U.S. arranged 9/11 so that they could use it as an excuse to pursue their wildest school-boy time dreams around the globe. Iran is far from perfect and has a lot of problems, but it's entirely up to us Iranians to deal with that.


These weren't arrests having anything to do with crime, prostitution, homelessness or runaway-children! They were arrested because of POLITICAL reasons, because they were deemed to be a threat to the STATE! Your great country must be pretty pathetic if 649 under 14 year-old girls are a threat to your government!



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:04 PM
link   
/31/05
Iran, Russia sign 'Zohreh' satellite deal
Tehran, Jan 31, IRNA -- Iran and Russia here Saturday signed an agreement on the design, consultations, testing and lift off of 'Zohreh' satellite.
The dlrs 132 million agreement was signed between Chairman of the Board of Directors of Iran Telecommunication Company Ahmad Moqaddam, deputy director of Russian Federal Space Agency (Rosaviakosmos) and managing director of 'Avia Exports of Russia.'

The satellite will have the capability of telephone communication and fax link, transmission of data and broadcast of radio and television programs throughout the country and will have 12 transponders.

The construction and lift off the satellite is estimated to take 30 months after opening of the letter of credit.

The Head of Russian Space Agency official said the project is a joint cooperation between Iran, Russia, Germany and France and possibly some other nations in the future.

"The technology used in the non-military satellite is more advance than many of the current ones under-construction," He added.

Deputy Minister of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Head of Iran's Space Agency Hassan Shafti here in December said that Mesbah Satellite built jointly by the ministries of Science, Research and Technology and ICT based on the foreign technology will be launched after March.

Speaking to reporters, he added that the satellite's final phase is currently being designed and that the project will cost around 10 million dollars in total.

Turning to another multi-purpose small satellite currently being designed, he said that the project aiming to transfer related technology and research potentials to Iran is being worked out in close collaboration with China and Thailand.

"The multi-purpose small satellite costing 44 million dollars is scheduled to be launched in 2006. Iran will shoulder 6.5 million dollars of the related expenses.

"The satellite has many potentials and its construction will increase the national power and improve the lifestyles of future generations," he added.

Reiterating the need to make further investment in satellites, he stated that currently the revenues gained by satellites throughout the world have increased by 50 percent.

In response to a question about Zohreh satellite, he said that it will respond to the telecommunications demands of the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB).

Asked about the reason for the delay in buying a complete satellite before access to technology for producing them domestically, he replied that possessing satellites without the proper related grounds will not have much effect on national development.

"Some European countries make use of satellite technology without possessing any.

"Similar to Western societies, satellite should also be used in various sectors in Iran, including the Internet, telecommunications, crisis management, public health, radio and television," he added.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:14 PM
link   

Originally posted by Leveller

Originally posted by Siroos
Iran belongs to the Iranian people, and any change of regime in Tehran will be up to the Iranian people, the way it should be, and the way it was before....


Now that's just surreal.



American society today is surreal. There is no society plagued with so many social ills, so much arrogance, selfishness, greed, vulgarity, moral corruption, deceit and incompetence at every level of society. If nothing else, It will be the incompetence and the greed which will lead to the downfall of America as we know it today.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by Siroos
American society today is surreal. There is no society plagued with so many social ills, so much arrogance, selfishness, greed, vulgarity, moral corruption, deceit and incompetence at every level of society. If nothing else, It will be the incompetence and the greed which will lead to the downfall of America as we know it today.


In your dreams ...



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by Leveller

Originally posted by Siroos
Even if Iran sits on a sea of oil, it's not unreasonable to want a cheaper and much more environmentially friendly energy source, and besides it would enable Iran to use its oil for industry and export instead. Besides, the oil will not last forever, and every country needs to find alternative energy sources for the future.



Do you honestly believe the trash that you are coming out with or have you just been living in the dark?
The modernised world has discovered that nuclear power contains none of the glorious elements that you bestow upon it and is actually winding down it's nuclear programs. They are looking for alternative energy sources elsewhere.

"An environmentally friendly energy source"? You're kidding me right? Ever heard of Chernobyl? Ever heard about the problems involved in the recycling or storage of nuclear waste? France might have helped kickstart the Iranian nuclear program back when the dangers of nuclear power weren't fully understood, but that doesn't justify it now.
Nuclear power won't be bringing Iran forward. It will be dragging it back into the last century.


And just how many Chernobyls have we had? Do you think that oil is more environmentally friendly? In any case, I have not hidden my true reason for why I want an ongoing nuclear programme in Iran. I want Iran to obtain nuclear weapons so that we can go on living in peace and peacefully pursue better lives for all our citizens without constantly being harassed by the U.S. and some other hostile states. I would rather take the risk to die from the radiation of a nuclear accident then to die being bombarded by U.S. or Israeli bombs or to always have to feel the frustration of not even daring to hope for better times and lives for my family and compatriots because the certain greedy and arrogant countries in the world will always butt in and ruin our lives.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by djohnsto77

Originally posted by Siroos

Originally posted by Leveller
Siroos. How about answering the questions that were put to you instead of just posting more photographs?

My question. Why were 649 under-14 girls arrested in this utopian capital city?

www.iranfocus.com...


Oh really, where in the article does it say that they were political arrests? I must have missed something. All I saw was that it said that 649 girls under 14 were arrested - it didn't mention why they were arrested. Let me inform you that "arrested" could mean that they were charged for minor "offenses" such as not behaving properly in public. Usually they're just given a warning which they must present to their parents and then they're released. I'm not in favour of it. But these were no political arrests. 649 girls under 14 politically active? I don't think so!

I have never claimed that Tehran was a utopian city. Tehran is just like other huge metropolises plagued with crime, prostitution, homelessness, runaway-children, etc. And it's a shame. But why is it that the U.S. always wants to focus their attention towards other societies and what's wrong in those socieities? There is SO INCREDIBLY MUCH wrong with U.S. society - but do you see other countries butting in and telling the U.S. what to do about it, or invading or bombing the U.S.? I suggest that the U.S. takes a serious look at itself before critisizing other countries because there is so much injustice, poverty, crimes, brutal forms of death penalty, sentencing of innocent people, social problems of all sort, and the list can go on forever! What right has the U.S. to interfere in Iran's internal affairs? Iran belongs to the Iranian people, and any change of regime in Tehran will be up to the Iranian people, the way it should be, and the way it was before certain sick elements in the U.S. arranged 9/11 so that they could use it as an excuse to pursue their wildest school-boy time dreams around the globe. Iran is far from perfect and has a lot of problems, but it's entirely up to us Iranians to deal with that.


These weren't arrests having anything to do with crime, prostitution, homelessness or runaway-children! They were arrested because of POLITICAL reasons, because they were deemed to be a threat to the STATE! Your great country must be pretty pathetic if 649 under 14 year-old girls are a threat to your government!



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:33 PM
link   

Originally posted by djohnsto77

Originally posted by Siroos

Originally posted by Leveller
Siroos. How about answering the questions that were put to you instead of just posting more photographs?

My question. Why were 649 under-14 girls arrested in this utopian capital city?

www.iranfocus.com...


If you read carefully you will notice that it says: "The SSF chief said that the Iranian capital was facing both a social and a security crisis, adding that his forces were prepared to crack down on anyone suspected of engaging in activities against the state. " See? It doesn't say that the girls were arrested for political activites. It says that the SSF chief said that the Iranian capital was facing bot a SOCIAL and a SECURITY crisis, and that his forces were prepared to crack down on anyone suspected of engaging in activities against the state. The girls and the last part of his sentence about his preparedness to crack down on anyone suspected of engaging in activities against the state have no relation to one another.





I have never claimed that Tehran was a utopian city. Tehran is just like other huge metropolises plagued with crime, prostitution, homelessness, runaway-children, etc. And it's a shame. But why is it that the U.S. always wants to focus their attention towards other societies and what's wrong in those socieities? There is SO INCREDIBLY MUCH wrong with U.S. society - but do you see other countries butting in and telling the U.S. what to do about it, or invading or bombing the U.S.? I suggest that the U.S. takes a serious look at itself before critisizing other countries because there is so much injustice, poverty, crimes, brutal forms of death penalty, sentencing of innocent people, social problems of all sort, and the list can go on forever! What right has the U.S. to interfere in Iran's internal affairs? Iran belongs to the Iranian people, and any change of regime in Tehran will be up to the Iranian people, the way it should be, and the way it was before certain sick elements in the U.S. arranged 9/11 so that they could use it as an excuse to pursue their wildest school-boy time dreams around the globe. Iran is far from perfect and has a lot of problems, but it's entirely up to us Iranians to deal with that.


These weren't arrests having anything to do with crime, prostitution, homelessness or runaway-children! They were arrested because of POLITICAL reasons, because they were deemed to be a threat to the STATE! Your great country must be pretty pathetic if 649 under 14 year-old girls are a threat to your government!



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:39 PM
link   
1/31/05
Experts favor engagement over military action to end nuclear showdown with Iran
By Lily Sarafan, National Iranian American Council
San Francisco, CA, January 26, 2005 - The increased scrutiny the Bush Administration has been putting on Iran’s nuclear program has sparked a can-do spirit of duty and nationalism amongst the Iranian nuclear physicist core, observed Dr. Ali Nayeri MIT Research Affiliate and Visiting Professor at the University of Florida. He added that any military or forceful action on the part of the U.S. is not a viable option because it will only serve to further motivate Iran to progress in the field.

These remarks were made at “Iran’s Nuclear Issue: Peering Through the Fog of Nuclear Proliferation”, a panel discussion hosted by the Bay Area Iranian American Democrats (BAIAD) association, in San Francisco on January 23.

Mehrdad Moayedzadeh, Founder and President of BAIAD, opened the discussion by stressing the need for the Iranian-American community to establish a solid political voice in America.

Joining Dr. Nayeri on the panel was Dr. Ivan Eland, Director of the Center of Peace and Liberty at the Independent Institute. Dr. Eland was also wary of U.S. military action in Iran. “After the Iraq fiasco we need to be more careful,” remarked Dr. Eland “invading Iran would be even a bigger disaster than Iraq.”

Eland went on to say that Iran’s nuclear ambitions are a product of Iran’s legitimate security concern that emerged since the U.S. entered both Afghanistan and Iraq. He warned against isolating Iran to avoid ending up with another Cuba, a country which the US has maintained "a failed foreign policy for over 45 years, keeping Castro in power."

With Iran’s Darolfonoon Institute in Tehran boasting a top ranking in publications of physics research papers among universities in the Middle East, it is no surprise that the U.S. takes Iran’s nuclear development seriously, the panel argued. The question remains: Is Tehran’s insistence that its nuclear development program is not aimed at producing weapons-grade uranium, but low-grade enriched uranium as a means to boost energy production, sincere? If it is, suggested Dr. Nayeri, Iran’s scientific superiority can be put to good use in creating alternative energy sources, like for instance geothermal energy.

Whatever the motives behind Iran’s nuclear development, Dr. Eland and Nayeri both agreed that engaging Iran is more constructive to U.S. and Iranian interests than any type of military action.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:40 PM
link   
Venezuela enlists Iran to steer oil to China
By Andy Webb-Vidal in Caracas
Published: January 31 2005 02:00 | Last updated: January 31 2005 02:00

Venezuela has enrolled Iran to help it accelerate a strategy to steer its oil exports to China and away from its traditional market of the US.


A team of traders from Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA), the state-owned oil company, is to be trained in London by Iranian advisers in how to best place oil in Asian markets, according to industry sources.

The action is part of efforts by Venezuela, the world's fifth-largest oil exporter, to strengthen ties with China at the expense of the US, with whom relations are strained again after two-years of calm.

Iran is Venezuela's closest ally in the Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries, which at the weekend agreed to keep output quotas unchanged in the short term to support oil prices.

Iran is also, as US vice-president Dick Cheney said recently, "right at the top of the list of potential trouble spots" identified by the Bush administration. Venezuela's asking for help from Iran may be read as provocative by some in Washington.

President Hugo Chávez on Saturday signed accords with Zeng Qinghong, China's vice-president, to allow the China National Petroleum Corporation to develop oil and gas reserves in Venezuela. "China has come here as a sister nation to extend a friendly hand to the neediest in Latin America," Mr Chávez said.

In recent weeks Venezuela has begun selling crude and fuel oil to China, in some cases, according to people familiar with the deals, at a discount price to offset shipping costs and render the trade feasible.

"Sending oil to China might not be economically viable, but Chávez's motives are not always economic," said a diplomat in Caracas.

Venezuela is in talks with Panama to find ways to transport oil to the Pacific Ocean. That would allow it to send oil to Asia more cheaply.

Mr Chávez, who has been in power for six years, complains that Washington is the centre of an "empire" bent on world domination.

He has threatened to cut off oil supplies to the US on several occasions in response to what he asserts are persistent attempts by Washington to meddle in Venezuela's domestic affairs.

Venezuela at the weekend settled an intense, two-week diplomatic dispute with the US-backed government of Colombia after what it claims was a recent US-assisted "kidnapping" in Caracas of a Colombian rebel wanted by Bogotá.

The decision to send oil to China coincides with intensifying concerns in Washington about Venezuela.

The US Government Accountability Office, Congress's nonpartisan investigative agency, this month began a study to examine the risk of potential oil supply interruptions from Venezuela.

Ali Rodríguez, Venezuela's foreign minister, recently said his country was not seeking to deny oil to the US, but only diversifying its markets.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:42 PM
link   
Iran vows enrichment suspension to be short-lived

Mon Jan 31, 6:40 AM ET Mideast - AFP



TEHRAN (AFP) - Iran's top nuclear negotiator warned that the Islamic republic intends to resume uranium enrichment and its current suspension of the controversial process will not last long.


AFP/File Photo



"The length of the suspension will not be very long and will be valid for the duration of the negotiations and only on the condition that the negotiations make progress," Hassan Rowhani told the Hamshahri newspaper in an interview.


"In the future we will most certainly resume enrichment, but as for how long the suspension will last is going to depend on many factors."


Iran, accused by Washington of trying to build an atomic bomb, has suspended uranium enrichment as a confidence-building measure during talks with the European Union (news - web sites) but the bloc now wants Tehran to commit itself to abandon the process completely.


The so-called EU3, Britain, France and Germany, are holding talks with Iran on a potentially lucrative trade pact linked to a definitive deal on its nuclear programme.


Iran insists that its nuclear activities are peaceful and that the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty guarantees its right to peaceful enrichment activities.


Asked if Iran would resume enriching uranium before the end of President Mohammad Khatami (news - web sites)'s mandate next August, Rowhani replied: "Negotiations should end before this date. But if they do not end we cannot wait until then."


"Our aim is to be able to continue our enrichment activities and at the same time to give the necessary guarantees to the international community that these activities are peaceful. The aim of the negotiations is to arrive at an agreement with the Europeans," he said.


Rowhani's comments marked a further sharpening of rhetoric between Tehran and the European Union, which is hoping diplomacy will bring about a peaceful solution to the Iranian nuclear issue.


At a meeting in Geneva this month, the EU3 told Iran that nothing short of "full cessation and dismantling of Iran's fuel cycle efforts" would provide the guarantees needed to prove the peaceful nature of the nuclear programme.


Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei warned European powers last week that they must take their nuclear negotiations with Iran seriously, otherwise Tehran would reconsider its cooperation.


Meanwhile the United States, which has sometimes expressed displeasure at the EU's diplomatic engagement of Iran, has also intensified verbal sparring with its arch-foe.


US President George W. Bush (news - web sites) has said he could not rule out using force if Tehran failed to rein in its nuclear plans, and US Vice President Dick Cheney (news - web sites) said Iran was "right at the top of the list" of global trouble spots.


US Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security John Bolton said Sunday that the Iranian nuclear programme was a major security threat for Washington's allies in the Middle East.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:43 PM
link   
Iran Expects Benefits From Iraq Election

Sunday January 30, 2005 8:16 PM


AP Photo VAH104

By NASSER KARIMI

Associated Press Writer

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Iran strongly criticized the U.S. invasion of Iraq that toppled Saddam Hussein and opposed the American occupation of its neighbor, but with Iraqis voting Sunday for a new government, Iran stands to reap huge benefits.

``This is a unique opportunity, not seen for centuries, for Iraqi policy to go in Iran's favor,'' said political analyst Hamid Reza Jalaipour.

Iran's state-run television hailed the vote as ``the beginning of democracy and the end of occupation and insurgency in Iraq.''

``I hope the election leads to the exit of the occupiers from Iraq,'' Defense Minister Ali Shamkhani said, according to the official Islamic Republic News Agency.

The election is likely to propel Iraq's majority Shiites into power for the first time since modern Iraq came into being in 1921, giving them the leading voice in shaping the country's future, which Shiite-dominated Iran hopes will lead to friendly relations between the two nations that fought a brutal war two decades ago.

Some Sunni Arab countries worry a new Iraqi government will form a Shiite alliance with Iran, but Iranians say they would be happy with a secular Iraqi government that will simply establish good relations. Most importantly, some said, Iraqis need to decide what they want.

``Let its people decide about their country's future,'' said Houshang Darab, 50, an Iranian textile broker who appealed to both the United States and Iran to avoid interfering in Iraq. ``A secular, democratic government is the best choice since it would not have any excuse for war.''

Iranians took the Iraqi elections in stride, with the historic event not being closely followed or discussed in Tehran. Television coverage was limited to a few minutes of videotape in regular newscasts. Newspapers published editorials on the elections, and some of them printed a supplement on the history of Iraq, the election process and political system.

Though both countries are home to most of the world's holiest Shiite shrines and their people have deep-rooted religious ties, an Iraqi Shiite theocracy could create problems for Iran, if it began to vie with Iran for leadership of worldwide Shiite Islam.

``A nonmilitary, non-ideological and elected government secures Iran's interests,'' said political analyst Saeed Laylaz.

The two countries have a bitter history. Iraq, controlled by Saddam's Sunni Arab dictatorship, fought an eight year war with Iran that killed and injured an estimated 1 million people before it ended in 1988. The two neighbors have never signed a peace agreement.

More recently, interim Iraqi Defense Minister Hazem Shaalan called Iran his country's ``first enemy,'' accusing it of supporting Iraqi insurgents and allowing them to freely cross the border. Tehran says it is trying to control the border, but at nearly 1,000 miles long, the frontier is hard to police.

The United States has also accused Iran of interfering in Iraq's affairs, a charge Tehran has denied.

The election has put Iranian hard-liners, who dominate political life here, in an awkward position. Support for the poll would put them on the side of their archenemy the United States, while calling for a boycott would deny Iraq's Shiites a historic opportunity for power.

Iranian leaders, nervous about the presence of U.S. forces next door, also hope the election will be the first step toward ending the U.S. presence in Iraq, but a smooth poll might give an unwanted boost to their country's own democracy movement. The result has been a wait-and-see, noncommittal approach.

Many Iranians, scarred by the memories of the war, looked to the elections as a guarantee there would be no repeat of that conflict.

``We would witness peaceful coexistence with Iraq if democracy materialize there,'' said Mohammad Kianooshrad, a former member of the national security and foreign policy committee in Iran's parliament.

Shahriar Heidari, governor of Qasr-e Shirin, a border city that was flattened by Iraqi forces during the war, hoped the vote would bring peace.

``We will be happy if Iraqis are happy. Their security is our security. Democracy in the country would work in favor of the border areas of Iran,'' he said.

He said the city's population of 30,000 would quadruple if peace and security were established in Iraq. About 130,000 people lived there before the Iran-Iraq war.







Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:44 PM
link   
All your arguing cannot answer this simple question:

WHY IS IT THAT THE U.S OF A HAS THE RIGHT TO OVERPOWER ANY OTHER COUNTRY THAT IT DOESNT REALLY LIKE ( OR FOR WHATEVER REASON)

It is not your God-given right

It is not your supreme racial right

In fact, guess what............... YOU DON'T HAVE ANY RIGHT TO DO SOMETHING LIKE THAT

If u can prove me wrong, prove me wrong in one sentence not give me random brainwashed material from your brainwashed .

[edit on 31-1-2005 by Conqueror]



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 03:59 PM
link   
1/30/05
Tehran takes trophy at first Women's Games
Tehran, Jan 30, IRNA -- Tehran lifted the trophy at the 1st Women Games of the Capitals, Islamic and Asian Countries here Saturday. Winning 84 medals, Tehran outpointed joint runners-up Tehran Municipality and Armenia and third-placed Kyrgyzstan.


photo: ISNA
Tehran snatched 38 golds, 23 silvers, and 23 bronzes while Municipality took 9, 16, 18 and Armenia bagged 8, 7, 13 gold, silver, and bronze medals respectively.

The Kyrgyz side won three golds and two silvers.

The fourth to 14th rankings went to Malaysia, Uzbekistan, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Qatar, Iraq, Pakistan, and Turkmenistan.

Some 700 sportswomen from 68 teams competed in 13 sporting fields during the five-day event.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 04:06 PM
link   

Originally posted by Conqueror
All your arguing cannot answer this simple question:

WHY IS IT THAT THE U.S OF A HAS THE RIGHT TO OVERPOWER ANY OTHER COUNTRY THAT IT DOESNT REALLY LIKE ( OR FOR WHATEVER REASON)

It is not your God-given right

It is not your supreme racial right

In fact, guess what............... YOU DON'T HAVE ANY RIGHT TO DO SOMETHING LIKE THAT

If u can prove me wrong, prove me wrong in one sentence not give me random brainwashed material from your brainwashed .

[edit on 31-1-2005 by Conqueror]


The United States Constitution gives that sole power to the Congress of the United States and the sole power to execute that power to the President of the United States.

Appropiate Duties of Congress:


To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas, and Offenses against the Law of Nations;

To declare War, grant Letters of Marque and Reprisal, and make Rules concerning Captures on Land and Water;


Powers of the President:


The President shall be Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and of the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and he shall have Power to Grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in Cases of Impeachment.


These powers are granted soley to these government branches by the People of the United States.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 04:06 PM
link   
I wonder if there were any Israeli women at those games?

Oh no. I forgot. Sports isn't even free of politics in Iran and the government forbids any contact with Israeli citizens.

By the way. Women in Iran take part in sports? Big deal. They've been doing that in the rest of the world for thousands of years.



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 04:09 PM
link   
OK MATE,

But who made these powers? You made them didn't you?

it still deosnt justify WHAT SO EVER you going around invading countries

it is simply too much to even state in words how obsurd the goings on around the world are getting



posted on Jan, 31 2005 @ 04:10 PM
link   
Good job, Siroos for giving all this information on Iran


It is very clear from the facts, pictures(speak thousands of words) and all logical arguments that all the western propoganda is all bogus. I just wanted to make a plea to the people. If you are against this war on Iran, then please say something against those people who are here calling for war against it, even when it is very clear from all the evidence that there is no reason too. These people are no less than Nazis. There are so many people who hate Nazis. Why tolerate these neo-Nazis? Nip them in the bud. If you don't they're going to take you down into hell with them.



new topics

top topics



 
0
<< 3  4  5    7  8  9 >>

log in

join