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The Mandela Effect Can No Longer Be Denied: Berenstein Was The Tip of The Iceberg

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posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:47 PM
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And another random thought.. . perhaps some scientists in a (alleged) secret space program started using a "hyper space" drive around 1989 and there are some "side effects?"

Just spitballin' in case something sticks for someone...




posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: Baddogma

why 1989 ?



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:52 PM
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Okay, I can't stand it ... in the spirit of community ...

Is no one going to bring up The Philadelphia Experiment?

I've actually spent a lot of time in that particular rabbit hole, myself.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.


But by YOUR reasoning ALL Mandela Effects are imaginary.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:07 PM
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how many times is abe vigoda going to die ? 4 ? 5?



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.


But by YOUR reasoning ALL Mandela Effects are imaginary.


Nope. Not imaginary at all. I have stated, repeatedly, that the "Mandela Effect" is a real cultural phenomenon that should be carefully studied by sociologists, and I would add, psychologists involved in cognition, memory, etc. Probably also anthropologists. It's fascinating!

Every example or point-of-evidence of "the Effect" that I have seen thus far can be explained in a reasonable, non-fantastic way as the effect of a combination of common mistakes, faulty memories, flawed perceptions, increased communicative options via the internet, and general hubris.

Not imaginary at all.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:10 PM
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I am seriously wondering at this point if we've really stumbled onto something big here. I mean, outside of the supernatural and philosophical arenas, into something of political concern. There are trolls here who are going through great lengths to discredit the topic and those participating. Why? If they were just trolling for fun, because they have no lives, nothing better to do, why make it into such a serious affair?

Case in point:


originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: jacygirl

Again, you are using peoples misspellings to support your case. He spells it wrong on his site, even though the linked work shows Berenstain. We have proven unequivocally in the Berenstain thread that SPELL CHECK corrects Berenstain to Berenstein and Bernstein depending on the editor.

You guys don't make yourselves look believable or intelligent when using these types of things to support the Mandela Effect. It's almost like you are trolling.



Using misspellings to to support our case? What is our case? Oh, right, that we remember things being differently than they currently are. Showing that others, including a legal professional, uses the "-stein" spelling is a way to support our claim, is it not? But no, apparently some of us are spending countless hours looking for the exact misspelling to support our claim. Wow. In truth, there aren't that many misspellings.

Using evidence of others, including a legal expert, of using the same spelling as us is so dire, so desperate that it makes us look like we are trolling? So, all of our emotional out-pours, personal stories, humorous exchanges and thoughts expressed was all some kind of an act? Think about it. Why would this seem like a reasonable argument to someone? Does anyone actually believe that this person considers this? Of course it's just a way of calling us "trolls," to reverse it on us, to get at us while also trying to discredit us. Why? Why go to such lengths?

And this is nothing new. This same member trolled me relentlessly before in a previous discussion on the Mandela Effect:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Why? Why go through such lengths to attack a subject you don't like? Why would a subject like this irk someone to the point of putting serious thought into how to fight it, how to twist things around, and why would they spend so much time and bother invested in it?

So yes, I believe we've stumbled onto something more sensitive than we've realized.
edit on 2-5-2016 by LoneCloudHopper2 because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-5-2016 by LoneCloudHopper2 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:10 PM
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a reply to: kibric


why 1989 ?


Oh, in some recent private conversations, like the academic I just "broke," they admitted they started noticing rare oddness then... as in the Berenstein/stain "divergence."

Then, perusing other conversations on the web, noticed a few others who noticed things "getting weird" around the late 80's early 90's is all...

and I had my own rabbit hole with alleged secret space programs (a la astr0) where it was mentioned in a thread that the first faster than light attempts were made in the late 80's.. .heh... that's all!



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:12 PM
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Stating that there are rational, reasonable, mundane explanations for a cultural phenomenon is not attacking the idea nor anyone discussing it.

The reactions to that statement, however, are quite interesting, as someone earlier pointed out.

More interesting by the moment, in fact. Thank you OP; this is indeed a great thread!



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: Baddogma

and I had my own rabbit hole with alleged secret space programs (a la astr0) where it was mentioned in a thread that the first faster than light attempts were made in the late 80's.. .heh... that's all!


Any link to that that you're willing to share?

Pretty fascinating ideas there.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.


But by YOUR reasoning ALL Mandela Effects are imaginary.


Nope. Not imaginary at all. I have stated, repeatedly, that the "Mandela Effect" is a real cultural phenomenon that should be carefully studied by sociologists, and I would add, psychologists involved in cognition, memory, etc. Probably also anthropologists. It's fascinating!

Every example or point-of-evidence of "the Effect" that I have seen thus far can be explained in a reasonable, non-fantastic way as the effect of a combination of common mistakes, faulty memories, flawed perceptions, increased communicative options via the internet, and general hubris.

Not imaginary at all.

Yes and we just proved that at some point those explanations will inevitably fall apart.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:17 PM
link   
a reply to: Gryphon66

Yup, either way it's fascinating!

Interesting to psychiatrists/neurologists/sociologists/folklorists ... and/or quantum physicists/mystics!

I just broke through into really considering the latter, myself... but all doors remain wide open, here.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.


But by YOUR reasoning ALL Mandela Effects are imaginary.


Nope. Not imaginary at all. I have stated, repeatedly, that the "Mandela Effect" is a real cultural phenomenon that should be carefully studied by sociologists, and I would add, psychologists involved in cognition, memory, etc. Probably also anthropologists. It's fascinating!

Every example or point-of-evidence of "the Effect" that I have seen thus far can be explained in a reasonable, non-fantastic way as the effect of a combination of common mistakes, faulty memories, flawed perceptions, increased communicative options via the internet, and general hubris.

Not imaginary at all.

Yes and we just proved that at some point those explanations will inevitably fall apart.


Perhaps you proved that to yourself, but in all respect, you've not proven anything about memory, faulty or otherwise, in our interaction. You made up a question that has no basis in reality, you refined that question based on my responses until you got an answer that you wanted, and now, you're trying to restate or rephrase all of that into your claim (which I hesitate to point out, you started with) that "faulty memories don't explain the 'Mandela Effect'"

Nothing in our conversation does that in any way. /shrug You proved that I personally, if faced with an impossible conundrum of extraordinary proportions that had no reasonable explanation, would conclude that I was insane.

That's it.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: Baddogma
a reply to: Gryphon66

Yup, either way it's fascinating!

Interesting to psychiatrists/neurologists/sociologists/folklorists ... and/or quantum physicists/mystics!

I just broke through into really considering the latter, myself... but all doors remain wide open, here.



I guess one could say that I came to it from the opposite direction, but yes ... I'm growing more interested in what's happening (here) by the minute.

(I found that "Astr0" reference by the way and am pursuing it; thanks for the connection!)



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.


But by YOUR reasoning ALL Mandela Effects are imaginary.


I have stated, repeatedly, that the "Mandela Effect" is a real cultural phenomenon

Well you need to make up your mind if you think the Mandela Effects are real or imaginary then.
We can't have a breakthrough with such inconsistency of your fundamental stance on the matter.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.


But by YOUR reasoning ALL Mandela Effects are imaginary.


I have stated, repeatedly, that the "Mandela Effect" is a real cultural phenomenon

Well you need to make up your mind if you think the Mandela Effects are real or imaginary then.
We can't have a breakthrough with such inconsistency of your fundamental stance on the matter.


LOL. I've stated very clearly what I believe above. Repeatedly. One thing I have NEVER said is that the "Mandela Effect" is imaginary. If I have, quote me.



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:29 PM
link   

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66

originally posted by: Ruiner1978

originally posted by: Gryphon66
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Waking up with a different spouse of a different gender would be attributable to a serious memory lapse (ed. or brain trauma).

Stroke, perhaps? Did I hit my head or something while I was asleep?


Nope, you have no head trauma. CAT scan shows no anomalies. You also are cleared of any mental health issues. You're completely sane.

You go back home to Colin.
Are you thinking:
"Something's not right here"

Or are you thinking:
"Wow memory sure is a funny old thing isn't it"

Straight answer.
This is important


You are begging the question to get the answer you want.

And no I didn't want a specific answer.
I just knew the answer you didn't want to give...



Yes, quite plainly, you were trying to limit your questions to provoke an answer.

Did you get it? Good. What does it have to do with "The Mandela Effect"?

From the data gathered from the experiment we now rationally know at what point "faulty memory" can not explain a Mandela Effect.
The subject's (your) reaction to the hypothetical scenario he was placed in shows logical evidence that at some point the "faulty memory" hypothesis falls apart.

Thank you for participating Gryph


No, actually it shows nothing of the sort as the two scenarios are not even similar.

The "Mandela Effect" is a real-world cultural phenomenon with massive attribution. It exists.

Your "example" was contrived and has no basis whatever in any reality. It was imaginary.

My answers say nothing about "faulty memories" because there were none involved.


But by YOUR reasoning ALL Mandela Effects are imaginary.


Nope. Not imaginary at all. I have stated, repeatedly, that the "Mandela Effect" is a real cultural phenomenon that should be carefully studied by sociologists, and I would add, psychologists involved in cognition, memory, etc. Probably also anthropologists. It's fascinating!

Every example or point-of-evidence of "the Effect" that I have seen thus far can be explained in a reasonable, non-fantastic way as the effect of a combination of common mistakes, faulty memories, flawed perceptions, increased communicative options via the internet, and general hubris.

Not imaginary at all.

Yes and we just proved that at some point those explanations will inevitably fall apart.


Perhaps you proved that to yourself, but in all respect, you've not proven anything about memory, faulty or otherwise, in our interaction. You made up a question that has no basis in reality, you refined that question based on my responses until you got an answer that you wanted, and now, you're trying to restate or rephrase all of that into your claim (which I hesitate to point out, you started with) that "faulty memories don't explain the 'Mandela Effect'"

Nothing in our conversation does that in any way. /shrug You proved that I personally, if faced with an impossible conundrum of extraordinary proportions that had no reasonable explanation, would conclude that I was insane.

That's it.

And how can you say the question isn't based in reality??
You may very well wake up next to Colin one day!



posted on May, 2 2016 @ 07:30 PM
link   
a reply to: Gryphon66
Yup, my own thread trying to deconstruct it's possibility went all over the place.. . but let's just say some fine, skeptical minds were left scratching their heads over that one... and there was/is hard to disprove evidence strewn about and it takes hundreds of hours to really connect it all...

but it is included along with this ME as those rare instances were there might be a "there there".. .meaning some of the most "probable" outlandish tales discussed on this site (etc).




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