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Firefighter chases dog and both are missing 411?

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posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

For sure……and who knows maybe it's definitely a case but I just think it's too early to tell and it does Paulide's work disservice to jump to conclusions. Anyways……..check this thread out on backpacking light forum in the area….
www.backpackinglight.com...

This guy who camped in the area……wow very weird and creepy experience…

Thanks for the report. Had the same experience camping by the river right before the sign for ... I think it was "ladybug camp" or something of the sort. Started as kind of a screaming, then like (sounds funny) a moaning like a high pitched male voice moaning during lovemaking.... super eerie! Just about made me jump out of my skin. I'd come out from under the tarp, clap my hands and it'd stop, only to move 60 degrees around my camp and begin again 1/2 hour later. A loong night up there by the Sespe......... Ah well. Dunno what it was but I played every mountain lion call I could find on the net and nothing sounded the same........... Kinda reminds you that you're a guest in the woods.




posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:43 PM
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They say Grizzly bears used to rule the Sespe? Is it completely unfathomable to think maybe Grizzlies could still be in the area? Anyways, some neat history on the area.

The California Oil Museum will be transported back to the wild days of the Santa Clara River Valley when the latest exhibit, “The Wild Sespe: Oil, Grizzlies and Gunsmoke” debuts on Sunday, July 2. Santa Clara Valley Bank is sponsoring the opening reception for the exhibit, starting at 2 p.m. at the museum, located at 1001 E. Main St.The exhibit blends the old with the new: never before exhibited photos early in the 20th century as well as contemporary photos of the Sespe by award-winning photographer Michael Moore - a native of Santa Paula - are highlights of the exhibit that attest to the enduring beauty of the wilderness.So awesome is the Sespe that the Fillmore Herald noted in 1911 that “Nature has few places in the universe possessing greater scenic beauty. . .”The rugged Sespe back country includes Sespe Creek, stretching 55 miles from high in the mountains above Ojai to the Santa Clara River near Fillmore, passing through the Sespe wilderness part of the Las Padres National forest and the home of the ambitious program to save the endangered California Condor.The Sespe was also the home to the Chumash who painted the most elaborate and colorful rock art in North America: international photographer Rick Bury’s Cibachrome prints of these mysterious and magnificent paintings, hidden in the Sespe’s remote caverns, are on exhibit for the first time in Ventura County.The Sespe’s enemy was mans’ ambitions: oil exploration, brownstone quarrying, borax mining, timber cutting, cattle and sheep grazing and river damming plans were common in the Sespe and in the 1920s a plan by the Fillmore Chamber of Commerce promoting a monorail system - through the mountains to Sespe Hot Springs 28 miles north of the city and on to Bakersfield - was derailed. Such stories and schemes are told in the exhibit with photographs and maps from early in the last century.
Grizzly bears once ruled the Sespe - a towering example stands guard over the exhibit as a reminder - but like other animals there was a bounty placed on their heads. Herman Keene was the most famous bounty hunter and his bear and mountain lion traps as well as scrapbooks and personal snapshots are also exhibited.Feuds over the Sespe’s rich natural resources were often violent struggles and gunsmoke often wafted through the area as people settled their scores with guns, including one gang of settlers desperate for Sespe water after years of drought. They ambushed and murdered Sespe land-grant owner Thomas More in 1877; fourteen years later, a similar fate claimed the life of Joe Dye, who tried to monopolize the oil riches of the Sespe. Visitors to the exhibit will also learn the fate of George Henley, who tried to block access to the Sespe’s brownstone quarries, oil fields and river damming sites.Contemporary history is also explored in the exhibit, curated by the Sespe Group of Santa Paula.The opening reception for “The Wild Sespe: Oil, Grizzlies and Gunsmoke” is free and open to the public although the museum requests small donations ($2 adults, $1 child). The California Oil Museum is open Wednesday-Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call the museum at 933-0076.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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a reply to: GreenMtnBoys

yeah, both those stories are super creepy.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:51 PM
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The Chumash indians who settled and lived in the area of the Sespe wilderness supposedly had rock art or paintings that some say resembled bigfoot!

www.bfro.net...



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: GreenMtnBoys

Look, where this guy ended up being found. He did not get there
under his own power barefoot. So how did he get there?



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:55 PM
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originally posted by: GreenMtnBoys
The Chumash indians who settled and lived in the area of the Sespe wilderness supposedly had rock art or paintings that some say resembled bigfoot!

www.bfro.net...


dude great research. thanks!



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:57 PM
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It's not out of the realm of possibility that a predator was hunting him down and seeked refuge atop a cliff.

He was near camp though... ok so give it 2 days looking for your dog, MAYBE 3 at most (personally I would for 1 day, kid/wife priority) hunger and survival instincts kick in after that 3rd day and you're walking down elevation back to civilization. the guy wasn't an idiot.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: randyvs
a reply to: GreenMtnBoys

Look, where this guy ended up being found. He did not get there
under his own power barefoot. So how did he get there?


I havent seen any pics of where he was found, but I'm wondering why he couldn't have gotten there barefoot? Many climbers go up vertical cliffs barefoot. Have you seen something that males you believe it wasnt possible?



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk




Have you seen something that males you believe it wasnt possible?


Yes I have, the area he was found in is akin to the river stix.
As I said in an earlier post. Very stixy. It wasn't plush mountain meadows.
And it wasn't rocky at all. It was over grown thick stick and thorn.
Something no human would think of attempting with barefeet.


edit on Rpm62714v16201400000041 by randyvs because: (no reason given)

edit on Rpm62714v182014u46 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:14 PM
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just watched a news report that claimed they saw him a few days ago but thought it was a sleeping bag. odd



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:15 PM
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can anyone post the photos of where he was found? or a link?



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:16 PM
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originally posted by: seahawkshos040
just watched a news report that claimed they saw him a few days ago but thought it was a sleeping bag. odd


And during a search they don't take a closer look? Fail...



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:18 PM
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the press conference video:

www.latimes.com...



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:23 PM
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I still feel uncomfortable about Byers (non)account of events of that evening; his moment by moment expereience and impressions of what led Herdman to bound off into the wilderness and not return, nor explain.

And evening it was, as that's when one would set up camp on the first night of a 4-day hike in any wilderness.

I also feel uncomfortable with the (non)reporting of how his body was found.
It was said that he was found in a place which was 'searched and flown over several times before'. But it was not mentioned if he was actually found by a tracker on foot or a helicopter above. The latter seems unlikely as his body was reported to have been obscured by brush. So how did they find him, really?

Did Byers' (non)testimony of events lead to the narrowing down of finding the body? Or was it 'haphazard'?

Another thing that bothers me greatly is that Byers supposedly headed off in 'his car' from the parking lot to seek help, after two fishermen conveniently led him back to the trailhead after he got lost. This was on Sunday, 2 days later.
So whose car did Duke the dog find his way back to? Herdman's or Byers'?
Did the two hikers come in separate cars to take a hike? Not likely!
So if not, and there was only one car, but the car was driven off by Byers, did he then park it in the very same place for the dog to find later?

Then another thing. In one of Paulides' accounts of the mysterious disappearance of a young boy, (can't remember who/where), there was mention of, again.....'two fishermen' who guided the way out!
What's it with the fishermen in these lost regions, and why didn't THEY get lost, lol!
What's about these casual fishermen, comfortably wading their way along a remote wilderness riverbed, acting like guides to those who have lost their bearings?

Not buying this story!...Any of it.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: roadgravel

i misinterpreted the comment. today they thought it was a sleeping bag until they got to the body



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:28 PM
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It is not surprising someone who is there for their first time would get lost. People who have been there often probably don't.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:30 PM
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a reply to: Starling

You may have something there. What if the whole thing is a lie?
Just a thought, but I don't trust anything that comes from the media.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 11:40 PM
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a reply to: Starling

starling, I posted an article earlier, it said that the helicopter pilot spotted the body, they had not searched that area by foot because they thought it unlikely spot for him to be......we need to wait for the autopsy report for more info



posted on Jun, 28 2014 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: Starling
In more than one post, I highlighted the fact that each report I read said Duke was found near the parking area where the vehicle "had been parked".
I found It strange that two different reports would use that language,...



posted on Jun, 28 2014 @ 12:16 AM
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a reply to: randyvs
I know you stated earlier that the body was found some 1,200' above the campsite... But also, that he would have needed to climb significantly higher, to have fallen... And even then, the location was not near enough such a falling-place to reasonably consider that such a fall was the cause of death...
If I've gotten any of that wrong, please correct me...

I know research100 also brought in the possibility of 3/4 of a mile away...

Is it possible this could mean 3/4 mile from camp and up 1,200' further in elevation?

I don't know... Just trying to piece some of the details together.

So Sorry!




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