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How long will it take for the debris from this exploding star to hit Earth?

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posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:41 PM
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this exploding star seems to have been verified now.

We know that light moves at 299 792 458 m / s and that the light from this 12 million year old explosion has just hit earth, but what about the debris???

How fast does the debris from an exploding star travel?

Any budding Brian Cox's or Carl Sagan's out there fancy a stab at it?? Phage maybe?




posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:45 PM
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At least 12 million years. Our own Sun will have probably all ready gone super nova by then.
edit on 1/22/14 by proob4 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by proob4
 


The light took 12 million years already and has just hit us.

If the debris travelled at 10% of the speed of light, the answer would be something along the lines of 10.8 million years.

I just don't know how fast it travels..



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:47 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


There is no debri from a star, it's not solid.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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Mianeye
reply to post by Beavers
 


There is no debri from a star, it's not solid.



As far as I understand it, that's not quite true. Exploding stars scatter the known elements throughout the universe.


Supernova nucleosynthesis is the production of new chemical elements inside supernovae. It occurs primarily due to explosive nucleosynthesis during explosive oxygen burning and silicon burning.[1] Those fusion reactions create the elements silicon, sulfur, chlorine, argon, sodium, potassium, calcium, scandium, titanium and iron peak elements: vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel. As a result of their ejection from supernovae, their abundances increase within the interstellar medium. Elements heavier than nickel are created primarily by a rapid capture of neutrons in a process called the r-process. However, there are other processes thought to be responsible for some of the nucleosynthesis of heavy elements, notably a proton capture process known as the rp-process and a photodisintegration process known as the gamma (or p) process. The latter synthesizes the lightest, most neutron-poor, isotopes of the heavy elements.


Wiki.

~Tenth



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:52 PM
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It's located in a whole different galaxy. The only thing reaching us are the photons.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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Beavers
reply to post by proob4
 


The light took 12 million years already and has just hit us.

If the debris travelled at 10% of the speed of light, the answer would be something along the lines of 10.8 million years.

I just don't know how fast it travels..


that doesn't make sense .... if the light took 12 million years to get here the debris would take longer than that .. not 10.8 million years



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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proob4
At least 12 million years. Our own Sun will have probably all ready gone super nova by then.
edit on 1/22/14 by proob4 because: (no reason given)


Our sun will start to become a Red Giant in about 500 million years at which point life on earth will cease to exist. The sun does not have enough mass to supernova, it will become a white dwarf star in about 5 billion years.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:56 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


Believe me I get what you are asking. So if we are just now getting the light (image) from it how far behind is the actual debris field. Probably unknown. Considering the debris breaking up and slowing down the further away it gets from the actual event. I would think when and if it did ever reach us it would be just dust?



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:57 PM
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Beavers
reply to post by proob4
 


The light took 12 million years already and has just hit us.

If the debris travelled at 10% of the speed of light, the answer would be something along the lines of 10.8 million years.

I just don't know how fast it travels..


If it took 12 million years for the light of this event to reach us then it's 12 million light years away in another galaxy and no threat to us.

Out milky way is about 100,000 light years across.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by nofear39
 


12 million years have already passed.

So another 10.8 million years from now if 10% is correct...



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


Hmm...ok. I might have been to quick on that one.

Anyway, here is some info to chew on.

Click me

Click me to


edit on 22-1-2014 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:00 PM
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proob4
At least 12 million years. Our own Sun will have probably all ready gone super nova by then.
edit on 1/22/14 by proob4 because: (no reason given)

Erm Our sun has a few billion years in it.

And from that distance the deris will be so dispersed I doubt more than a few atoms will hit us. And even then it will be in a few hundred million years.
edit on 22-1-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by proob4
 


probably yes!

and I'm not worried at all, I'll be long dead in 10.8 million years


It's not the 'doom' aspect I'm going for, I'm just interested in the maths and science behind it!



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:00 PM
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Like previously said there is no debris from an exploding star. The gamma burst was instantaneous already seen. The photons get brighter as the light reaches peak
But it took 12 million years for that light to reach us.

So this star really didn't just explode, it exploded 12 million years ago.

But absolutely no debris



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:01 PM
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12 million light years is a long, long, long distance. And there is a lot of stuff in between for the actual material ejected to hit or be attracted to along the way. Also, the expansion would be similar to throwing marbles. Throw marbles in every direction ten feet, and they'd be a few feet from each other. Throw marbles from every direction 1000 miles, and how far apart would the marbles be?


In astronomy, the interstellar medium (or ISM) is the matter that exists in the space between the star systems in a galaxy. This matter includes gas in ionic, atomic, and molecular form, dust, and cosmic rays. It fills interstellar space and blends smoothly into the surrounding intergalactic space. The energy that occupies the same volume, in the form of electromagnetic radiation, is the interstellar radiation field.

The interstellar medium is composed of multiple phases, distinguished by whether matter is ionic, atomic, or molecular, and the temperature and density of the matter. The thermal pressures of these phases are in rough equilibrium with one another. Magnetic fields and turbulent motions also provide pressure in the ISM, and are typically more important dynamically than the thermal pressure is.


en.wikipedia.org...

I looked for a source to see if there are calculations on whether or not anything would hit us from something so far away, but I couldn't find. =/
edit on 22-1-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:02 PM
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reply to post by flammadraco
 


It's the science behind it I'm interested it, we'll all be long gone by the time it hits, I'm just interested in the calculations behind it.

Brian Cox could probably make an entire show out of it, I find this stuff fascinating



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:04 PM
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Beavers
reply to post by proob4
 


probably yes!

and I'm not worried at all, I'll be long dead in 10.8 million years


It's not the 'doom' aspect I'm going for, I'm just interested in the maths and science behind it!


It wouldn't be 10 million years. The light from the supernova is moving the speed of light.


The explosion expels much or all of a star's material[2] at a velocity of up to 30000 km/s (10% of the speed of light), driving a shock wave[3] into the surrounding interstellar medium.


The material ejected from the star is only moving 10% the speed of light. So if anything, if even one atom of hydrogen hit us, it would be more like a 120 million year trip.
edit on 22-1-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-1-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:06 PM
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Supernovae do not cause expanding debris. They leave supernova remnant Nebula. It doesn't expand limitless, it slows down as remnant cools down.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


I hadn't thought of that, I just assumed it would explode 360 degrees and at least something would come our way (eventually) but you make a good point.

I'm still interested in the estimated speed if you find anything!



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