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How long will it take for the debris from this exploding star to hit Earth?

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posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:09 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


I'd be more worried about the Andromeda Galaxy colliding with the Milkyway in about 4billion years from now.

What calculations are you looking for? If your looking for distances involved here, times the speed of light (distance travelled in a year) multiplied by 12 million. The debris from this event would have created a nebula of gas by now and the formation of new stars and solar systems is already on the way.




posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


yes, 120m years, you're right, thankyou



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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Beavers
reply to post by nofear39
 


12 million years have already passed.

So another 10.8 million years from now if 10% is correct...


no thats wrong to

120 million years from now you mean



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:12 PM
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proob4
At least 12 million years. Our own Sun will have probably all ready gone super nova by then.
edit on 1/22/14 by proob4 because: (no reason given)


I'm afraid that our Sun isn't big enough to go supernova.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by Mianeye
 


will check those out, cheers!



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by flammadraco
 


I've assumed the 10%..... that's the bit im interested in!



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


It will burn up before it ever reaches Earth.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


for all practical purposes = never

matter from the destruction of the parent star can be assumed to have had an initial velocity of sub C , and as the energy of the explosion was the primary force on it - it will subsequently decelerate

the lower its velocity drops - the greater the influence of intervening gravity wells and interstellar media will be - thus its velocity will continue to fall



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 04:20 PM
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It looks like the 10% average is within acceptable standard models (30000 k/s) for the speed of ejected materials in a super nova event.

So the light took 12 million years to reach us, light has no mass (photon), the material atoms would take 120 million years.... in a vacuum!

We do not exist in a vacuum, we exist in a universe where inter-stellar medium (materials) is present between star systems. Therefore when the material atoms, traveling 30000 k/s to start with, reached the inter-stellar medium outside the star systems previous sphere of influence. The materials will collide with the other materials in the medium (material has mass). The interstellar medium will absorb the impact of the materials slowing down the rate of travel (material added to material creates friction and slows down momentum).

At some point the material will loose its momentum entirely and cease to impact the medium further. The material ejected will have been absorbed by the inter-stellar medium long before the 120 million year journey to our solar system ends.

Not one atom from this event is capable of reaching our system at that great a distance traveling through medium, in my opinion.

God Bless,



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 04:21 PM
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ignorant_ape
reply to post by Beavers
 


for all practical purposes = never

matter from the destruction of the parent star can be assumed to have had an initial velocity of sub C , and as the energy of the explosion was the primary force on it - it will subsequently decelerate

the lower its velocity drops - the greater the influence of intervening gravity wells and interstellar media will be - thus its velocity will continue to fall


excellently put.

I agree.

God Bless,



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by Beavers
 


How do you suppose the debris would take 10.8 million years.... 12 million years at light speed is 12 million light years, the distance light travels in 1 year. If the debris is traveling 10% the speed of light it's going to take much longer than that for the debris to get here. I know you have 10.8 million years on top of 12 but It's more than that.... isn't it? I just worked the most ridiculous shift of my life over the span of two days. 19.5 hrs is bull#.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by proob4
 


The debris, if any will never get here. We will not be in the same place, as when that star exploded, entire galaxies have moved, and my now be in the path of the debris pretty much soaking it up. The star exploded 12 million years ago, in point a while we were in point b, now we are in point c while that debris is still traveling along a different path.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 04:57 PM
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Debris would be moving a whole lot slower than the speed of light.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 05:08 PM
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If you see the light photons, the gamma rays move right along with it. Gamma rays are the biggest threat. If there hasn't been any damage from the gamma rays, so far, then there is nothing to worry about. The heavier particles would lag considerably and will take a very long time to get here. By the time the particles get here, their disbursal will make them insignificant.
edit on 22-1-2014 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 05:10 PM
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reply to post by AngryCymraeg
 


You're correct on that one - the sun doesn't have enough mass to squeeze the carbon core and heat it up to the temperatures needed to fuse the carbon into heavier nuclei - no explosion, no black hole, white dwarf definitely though like Flammadraco already said. Even if there was life on Earth when the sun starts to go red giant, I'm pretty sure any water on our planet would be vapour and thus making Earth uninhabitable, so we don't have much to worry about.

Betelgeuse is supposed to supernova within the next thousand years, which is kinda cool.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 07:03 PM
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Why is some posters saying an exploding star has no debris..


www.gemologistsam.net...

Am I missing something...if the few are saying no debris from an exploding star then where did gold come from.
Would love to hear the answer...



edit on 22-1-2014 by nitetrain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 09:50 PM
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Cito
But absolutely no debris

I don't know ... debris is a pretty broad term. Could plasma be considered debris? What about simple excessive energy? When a star goes supernova, could we consider whatever was pushed out of its orbit debris?

Also, what constitutes the physical make-up of a typical white dwarf? I know it's all speculation ... but ... there seems to be some spectral evidence of a carbon remnant ... a gigantic diamond floating in space ... in at least one observed SN location.



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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reply to post by ElohimJD
 


thank you



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 10:02 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


hadn't thought of this either, I just assumed the explosion would be a 360 degree thing and ultimately touch everything within it's blast radius (eventually).



posted on Jan, 22 2014 @ 10:03 PM
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Overnight if they use federal express.



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