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Curiosity: Potential Anomalies (Update 01/2014)

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posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: funbox

Ha HA HA



Mars Warrior Skull in Helmet & Ancient Alien Skulls Hoagland Warrior skull knight.
edit on 11-7-2014 by jamie6737 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-7-2014 by jamie6737 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 03:19 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
but im hoping on clam country to return , a bed of clams would be a clincher, do you know of their preference to pressures here on earth ? are they found in the shallows , or maybe they have a wide variety that can be found glowing in the deeps too .

That other little object you pointed out looks a bit like a barnacle of some kind.


And yes I would expect them to be at the same level as the ones we saw before. The biggest problem is that on Earth they have a tendency to thrive in tide pools. Unfortunately, Mars apparently never had tides.

edit on 12-7-2014 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 05:37 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I suppose it pointless speculating upon the anatomy of a mollusc like creature on mars, too many variables, based on too many earth bound assumptions with that said , and regards to the topographical points you made earlier , it would be naïve to think that reoccurrences along the path of this journey would not be an attribute indicative of a patterns that could be associated with biological life forms.

albeit weathering can be unusual at times on certain rock formations and elemental clusters, I still think that we would be seeing more of similar patterns on many surfaces, than the sparse nuggets of curiousness we are seeing at the moment


im still more interested with the extremities though ,

funBox



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 01:13 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
I still think that we would be seeing more of similar patterns on many surfaces, than the sparse nuggets of curiousness we are seeing at the moment

Have to agree. We're not finding large beds of creature-like fossils, which might be expected. Life is like that, at least here on Earth. If it can find a niche to live, it reproduces and thrives as much as it can. On Mars, we just find the occasional odd shapes, consistent though they may be.

mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

edit on 13-7-2014 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 06:11 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
On Mars, we just find the occasional odd shapes, consistent though they may be.

Yes, and another different is that we don't find shapes for several different species, as we do on Earth.

The place where I found the Carcharodon Megalodon tooth had fossils of many species: shells of several types, the tooth I found and a small, needle-like tooth that my sister found but that she let fall and never found again.

The layer above that had less variety, but even that had fossils of at least some four or five different species.
edit on 13/7/2014 by ArMaP because: corrected "Carcharadon" to "Carcharodon", I always get that wrong.



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 06:44 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

can we say that for certain? some of the things we have been seeing are of difference . although sporadic, would this not be consistent to billions of years of mixed erosion ?its like trying to find a complete letter after 100,000 have been through a grinder, would we find anything at all given the time frame and the hypothetical knowledge we have of that time frame?

if only curiosity had a fleet of robot archaeologists drones... o well


funBox



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 08:05 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
can we say that for certain?

Can we really say something for certain?



some of the things we have been seeing are of difference . although sporadic, would this not be consistent to billions of years of mixed erosion ?

I don't think so, as life exists (as far as we can see here on Earth) not as just one or two species in an area, it exists in ecosystems, with many different species of animals and plants, so, even without plant fossils (I never saw one, compared with hundreds of animal fossils), I would expect to see more fossils in a place that was supposedly one of the best for that, a lake.



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

that's not what im talking about , there very well may be millions of different types of fossil deep down , but they would be entity covered by the shifting sands, I wonder if in another billion years gale crater will be filled to the brim with sand , and look like some of the other craters on mars that are like that

funBox



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
that's not what im talking about , there very well may be millions of different types of fossil deep down , but they would be entity covered by the shifting sands, I wonder if in another billion years gale crater will be filled to the brim with sand , and look like some of the other craters on mars that are like that

If the sand covers all the fossils how can you see them on the surface? Or are the sands choosing which fossils to show and which ones to hide?
Yes, there may be millions of fossils underground, but that's not what I am talking about, I am talking about things we can see at a specific level, either on the natural surface (like some places in the area I live, where people used fossils to make the walls around their small farms or on their homes) or on artificial surfaces created by excavations (like the place where I found the Carcharodon Megalodon tooth, some 10 metres below the surface).



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

not all the fossils , lets say for example the smattering that we may have already seen, is an example of the periodicity in seeing exposed fossil from one sol to the next, think of it as the occasional mouldy tooth sticking through a sea of mouthwash showing its plaque and assorments .. then for days the rover sees just mouthwash then comes to another island of potential curiosity


varied patterns of erosion and accumulation , like walking through a desert and finding an oasis then walking another mile and finding alien base...

yeah

funBox



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: funbox

Well, my experience on looking for fossils tells me that's not how things are in reality, at least on the situation I had where I live, you just don't find one fossil here and some other fossil some days latter, some dozens of metres (or more) away, you either find fossils or you do not, specially when looking over such a large area as that that Curiosity has already covered.

Edited to ask: is the sentence "my experience on ..." correct? It doesn't sound right to me, but that's the only way of saying it that comes to my mind.

edit on 13/7/2014 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

what kind of terrain are you fossil hunting on? does it cover the ground curiosity has so far traversed ? is it even remotely comparable ? do you use a robot with cameras? ground radar ? a spade?.. supply of air ?


Edit

try .. my experience with..


funBox


edit on 13-7-2014 by funbox because: grammer wolves



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 01:48 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
what kind of terrain are you fossil hunting on?

Sedimentary terrain, 2 km from a river and 10 km from the sea.


does it cover the ground curiosity has so far traversed ?

No, Almada is not on Mars.


is it even remotely comparable ?

Geologically, yes, although with signs of tectonic movements that I haven's seen on Mars.


do you use a robot with cameras?

No.


ground radar ?

No.


a spade?..

No.


supply of air ?

Only the medicine for my asthma.


I used my eyes and my hands.


try .. my experience with..

Thanks.



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

fair play to all of those breakdowns


bar the geological. a crater, I would have thought is a different makeup to your local landmass , sea and river ,compared to a huge pool of landlocked water, tributaries in and out maybe , but essentialy a giant lake


not really geologically similar in my eyes

funBox



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 04:14 PM
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a reply to: funbox

The similarity is not the crater part, it's the sedimentary part that fills the crater, although the sediments are from the sea covering and uncovering this region and not a lake, but this are, besides the actions of the sea results also of the actions of the Tagus river, that's why this region had a gold mine.

The layers we have seen on Mount Sharp remind of the layers that make up the whole Almada region, and you can get an idea of those (although not that visible, but I couldn't find a good photo of those layers) layers on the view on this page.

I live on the other side of the cliff (the ground slopes down to the river on the other side), 1 km from that cliff.



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

an interesting view to say the least, although I struggled in making a visual comparison , maybe just a case of missing the wood through the trees


ill bet you can here the souls of the dead when you go for walks along them cliffs, the amount of fossils with form or without, must scream at every footfall

funBox



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: funbox

Besides the fossils we also have some signs of human settlements since the beginning of the Bronze and signs of Roman (salting tanks, among other things) and Phoenician presence (with some Phoenician coins and small objects that they used to buy and sell all over the Mediterranean, like those small Egyptian scarabs), so I'm sure there are many souls here, if they exist and have a reason to remain here.



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

sounds like you have a good mixup when you go out hunting, a bit of a lucky dip so to speak,
found any footprints yet ?




sol 688

funBox



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 02:36 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
sounds like you have a good mixup when you go out hunting, a bit of a lucky dip so to speak,
found any footprints yet ?

No, this area, being a sedimentary area, is not good to create rocks with footprints, but some 30 km to the north and some 50 km to the south there are several dinosaur footprints.




sol 688

Interesting find, I don't have a possible explanation for that one.



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

ah, so when you are bored with the variety in you're local , its only a short walk away for some footprint casting,

Arkens dropped up a thread about it

broken shell thread

albeit hes calling it a broken shell, why didn't I think of that


for me the most amusing explanation so far, is the lines being caused by glaciation , mini icebergs are go


funBox




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