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Curiosity: Potential Anomalies (Update 01/2014)

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posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: alienreality
Ok, so tell me which images you started out your analysis with if they weren't the single-layer JPEGs? You cannot pull any layer information out of a JPEG. Trust me.

You accuse me of "not wanting to learn anything", so go on: in the interests of educating us all and fighting ignorance, please tell us all what steps and which software you used to create these enhanced images.

edit on 28-4-2014 by Rob48 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 11:16 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
This is the result of the brush tool used on the rock to clear the reddish dust. mars.jpl.nasa.gov...(in your picture, the area is in shadow of the instrument turret, so it appears reddish)

I was initially going to dismiss it as that, also. And I would go along with that explanation if it wasn't for all the various "fibers" seen at right angles to the circular pattern, many of them obviously ON TOP of some of the lower layers following the circular pattern. I don't know of any rotating brush that makes a cross-hatch pattern.

Something to consider.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: funbox
kinda abrasive for a tool for removing dust, its spoiled the samples natural look if this is the case.

It looks like a wire brush. Pretty harsh. But perhaps the non-circular features in the image indicate the actual natural look of the rock.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: Rob48

Stop saying "we" as if you already represent the same thoughts as all others here, that is on page one of the shill handbook, rofl, everything you do just falls flat and does not address all the key points I have shown.
One of the biggest is (the very first image I put in my post above has a dog at the very top of image and he is even labled "Dog" it's labled in black line like a ball point pen, that little black line is exactly what you see when you render an image without all the texture mapped and leave some things you would see this, and that is all I did was remove some top coverings. And the second image has over passes like on ramps with places missing now that were unseen before, and a train track even goes into one. you haven't even studied it at all. Just slouching back getting fatter than even the last time I saw you and still you have no new material.

There is even a lot of sheep labled "bahh" 53 and crap like that, and pigs are ooink and funny crap, stuff you usually really laugh at if you knew no one was watching you...
"Gong hammers, your out" So at least have the dignity to walk away with no dignity, I'm sure you have before.

If you even had any valid counterpoint that was at least a little bit above the level of thinking my 6 year old daughter has, I would listen, but you can't so you use all of those snobbery type ones that only divert away and using assumptions that should embarrass you for suggesting them but, sure don't (that's the funny part). The same dog by the way , the very same one is used seamlessly in other places in this image (showing that it is modeled in as a complete scene), as well as many others! Explain that one... No wait, please don't it will just make me start bleeding out to hear anymore bleeps from you.:rofl:. And speaking of bleeping, there is a goat that gets used over and over and has number notation and a nickname like they all do, a lot of those too in the same image..

Why not give it serious study? Agenda is why.
edit on 28-4-2014 by alienreality because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: alienreality

Wow, where are you getting all that from a simple request to specify which image editing steps you undertook? You said I don't want to learn, but I asked, so teach me.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: alienreality

IMO we should indeed explain what kind of filters we applied to an image when altering the original versions. And we should always link to the source images. With that said, I think some of the previous comments are justified.

I also believe that nobody on this thread can 'prove' anything unless we see a crystal clear image of fossilized complex life on Mars similar to life we know from Earth. All we can do is keep pointing to things we find interesting while accumulating indicators for past life on the red planet.

Perhaps it's a good idea to just move on and look for the next unexpected piece of the puzzle!

edit on 28-4-2014 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: Rob48
a reply to: alienreality

Wow, where are you getting all that from a simple request to specify which image editing steps you undertook? You said I don't want to learn, but I asked, so teach me.


You havent understood a single concept so far and have resisted even considering looking at what I have done already in any way that show you really wished to know, but it is obvious what you want to know.
And your not understanding anything so far shows you aren't even worth any further discussion with.
I would look really gullible to go any further for you. come back when you have an real desire to expand those thought processes about things... Anything. because I already included the answers by showing how these scenes are made in stages with different color groups for different layers so they enhance the pareidolia effect and also make it hard to seperate it all out and they hope no one would ever try.

and get it done clean not all garbled up like those you posted are. Mine only leaves the models on the top and strips the texture off the ground terrain meshwork. that is all.
edit on 28-4-2014 by alienreality because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: alienreality

You havent understood a single concept so far and have resisted even considering looking at what I have done already in any way that show you really wished to know, but it is obvious what you want to know.


I admit that I don't understand how image analysis can "remove 20% of a layer applied by NASA" to a JPEG image. Clearly you know, so why don't you explain it rather than posting images with no explanation other than "this says Dog in lines like ballpoint pen" (which again I cannot see...).

Even just a simple arrow to highlight the areas of interest would help.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: Rob48

On this thread we've allowed considerable leeway for speculation as well as play. These are mixed with the very good finds, the educational posts which describe both how the Rover is photographing Mars and how each camera works in tandem with the others, and other strangely cool factors. So alienreality's alien reality finds a home here, and many of us really want to see the shapes and images he posts, if for nothing else but to give another twist to the NASA photographs, which we all like to see as it winds its way towards the Buttes (if alienreality could show us the skeleton and the "Gay" word, etc., it would help to show that he is seeing something in there). I for two enjoy images made up of natural phenomena, to me they show how the brain works. alienreality is convinced NASA is creating these images in some kind of photoshop program, and that's as much of a theory as any other. Can he prove it, or show us more? Maybe, or at least he's giving it the old college try.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: This Thread

Just spotted this set of images in Curiosity's navcam archives from sol 613:

Sol 613 Source Images

Anybody have an idea what that streak of light could be? Long-term exposure? Any comets around in the martian skies at this time of year?
edit on 28-4-2014 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: jeep3r
Anybody have an idea what that streak of light could be? Long-term exposure? Any comets around in the martian skies at this time of year?

It's not the same thing in this left front hazcam image, is it? It's taken at a different time.



edit on 28-4-2014 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Hmmm ... good point, although I didn't notice the rest of the rover on the navcam pics. But perhaps it's a lens reflection of some sort? Or a celestial body (phobos, deimos etc.) imaged using long-term exposure?

I'm quite sure, though, it's just a matter of time until this gets cleared up ...



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:24 PM
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a reply to: jeep3r

The interesting thing with this Mars light - and it's becoming a genre now - is that it moves upwards in the sky as time goes by (or does time go by?)


edit on 28-4-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

Yep, that would at least rule out the cosmic ray strike explanation and it's obviously not dead pixels on the camera sensor either. The images are seperated by ~2 minutes each and the streak moves from above Gale just to disappear behind it ~10 minutes later.

And yes, the "lights in the martian skies" theme is starting to become a genre of its own!

edit on 28-4-2014 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Perhaps this is the explanation? They already did 12 second exposures on April 24 to image Ceres & Vesta. I'm pretty sure NASA/JPL are soon going to post an annotated image on their site, then we'll know ...



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister
a reply to: jeep3r

The interesting thing with this Mars light - and it's becoming a genre now - is that it moves upwards in the sky as time goes by (or does time go by?)



Looking at the time stamps, it is actually moving downwards over time.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: jeep3r
Perhaps this is the explanation? They already did 12 second exposures on April 24 to image Ceres & Vesta. I'm pretty sure NASA/JPL are soon going to post an annotated image on their site, then we'll know ...

They've decided that rather than having the Mast Cam just sit there at night not doing anything, they'll point it at the sky and see what they can see.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: jeep3r

That one needs an animated GIF.




At the end I think we can see some other things moving more or less in the same direction, so I suppose that's one of Mars' moons, smaller than what we can see on the photos from the Mastcam because the Navcams have different lens.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: Rob48

originally posted by: Aleister
a reply to: jeep3r

The interesting thing with this Mars light - and it's becoming a genre now - is that it moves upwards in the sky as time goes by (or does time go by?)



Looking at the time stamps, it is actually moving downwards over time.


Yep.

And if it is a comet or meteor, it's the slowest one i've ever heard about!


Anyone remember the Russian mission to Phobos, that captured that long, thin, cylindrical object before the probe suddenly winked out...?

It also captured an very long and thin, cylindrical shadow on the Surface of Mars too if i remember rightly...could this be THAT thing?

Armap, nice Gif..how can i download it as an animated gif, or can't i?
edit on 28-4-2014 by MysterX because: added info



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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Here's something odd. Almost looks like drawing of some kind. Like a parrot with a bowtie on its head.

mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
Maybe the brush tool at work again.



edit on 28-4-2014 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



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