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Crush the surveillance state for only $100

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posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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Infomercial….

Tired of being spied on by your government?

Tired of having all of your online activity monitored in the name of national security?

Well, you no longer have to! For only $100 you can crush the NSA surveillance program and go off the grid!!


Does that sound a little unbelievable? Check this out.




If it’s plugged into the internet there is a near 100% chance that the National Security Agency is monitoring it.

So how does the average American get off the control grid? According to well known anti-virus software founder John McAfee the answer is simple.

Decentralization.

Rather than connecting to the telecom sponsored (and government integrated) internet, we bypass it completely and connect directly to each other’s devices in a peer-to-peer environment using what is essentially a distributed network architecture.

He’s been working on the new device, dubbed D-Central, for several years but has recently sped up its development in light of revelations that the NSA is tapping the digital interactions and personal correspondence of virtually every American citizen. The new “NSA Killer” will, according to McAfee, make it difficult if not impossible for the NSA to tap into personal communications like they do today because the device would operate in what is known as a “dark web” and allow an individual to completely obscure their identity.


I’m not sure if this is the revolutionary device it’s being touted to be. After all, with a range of 3 blocks you’re not exactly surfing the web; this is more like an internet based walkie-talkie. I wonder how long before owning this device makes you “potential domestic terrorist” in the eyes of DHS????? My guess is the second you buy it!




posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by seabag
 


Wasn't he the guy caught up in a murder case not so long ago? My suspicious mind makes me wonder if someone tried to frame him because they didn't like what he was working on.

I found an interview with him. John Mcafee


"People ask me, 'How did it feel to kill a man?' And I can honestly tell them I wouldn't know, because I never have," he says, gazing through piercing green eyes.
edit on 6-10-2013 by Wide-Eyes because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 10:55 AM
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Okay, so he took the phone dial-up modem to the wireless age. This was his big idea?? This is his brainstorm to short circuit the NSA? A wireless version of FIDONet?

Oh good lord, may the last man out remember to turn off the lights. We're doomed.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 10:59 AM
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Sounds good but personally it'll be useless as i'm sure given the NSA own's the actual roads the data travels even breaking it up via different routes wont do much when you can just wait and have the packets delivered down to your particular link to be decoded....and also what use is it if you live in a low wi-fi area etc...might be good in the centre of a metropolis but the moment you head out it's going to be not much use



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by Maxatoria
 


This is also assuming the NSA just sits in places like Ft Meade and that new Super-Snoop center in Utah to rely entirely on TCP/IP network connections to record everything happening across the vast nation.

I'd ask Mr. McAfee if he's noticed those giant ugly poles people have been littering the land with over the last 15-20 years or so as if planting giant flowers or something. I think ...Yes... Cell Towers.. That's what they call them. I knew it would come to me...

I think it came to the NSA too....as the very first one was being designed. He thinks they need the net to capture what we're up to? lol.....

I thought he was one of the good guys? He's too intelligent to have not fully realized this and just chosen to ignore it.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by seabag
 


The first thing I wondered about after seeing this story was if the NSA was already working on a method of trolling devices by UUID.

A universally unique identifier (UUID) is an identifier standard used in software construction, standardized by the Open Software Foundation (OSF) as part of the Distributed Computing Environment (DCE). The intent of UUIDs is to enable distributed systems to uniquely identify information without significant central coordination. In this context the word unique should be taken to mean "practically unique" rather than "guaranteed unique".


Version 5 UUIDs use a scheme with SHA-1 hashing; otherwise it is the same idea as in version 3. RFC 4122 states that version 5 is preferred over version 3 name based UUIDs, as MD5's security has been compromised.
Wiki
As long as there's a connection point to any network the potential for surveillance is there. Probably why the NSA is after encryption so bad.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 11:11 AM
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reply to post by seabag
 


Sounds to me like a trick the GESTAPO used during the NAZI times. They advertized "Wireless radio sets" in shops. This way they found out who didn't like Hitler too much. Back then the Germans had the "Einheits-Sender" - (Unity radio) meaning only a few stations that were totally in Nazi hands. And you could not dial out to BBC for example with these radios. The tuning system was blocked in these radios so you could only get the German radio.
Don't forget sometime ago the Former STASI #2 man was taken in by DHS or some other group. Similar like "Operation paperclip" after WW2.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Not sure if the same in the states as here but the cell towers basically communicate between each other using tcp/ip as it makes doing 3g browsing so easy so just have a NSA device at each convergence point of several cell towers and job done for the listening and all they need to do is put it all together



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by Guenter
 



Sounds to me like a trick the GESTAPO used during the NAZI times. They advertized "Wireless radio sets" in shops. This way they found out who didn't like Hitler too much.


I was thinking along these lines. Anything advertised as a way to circumvent government control seems like a government fishing expedition to me; they're trolling for terrorists (or potential domestic terrorists). Something tells me even if it's legit he won't get many (if any) investors and even fewer buyers.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 12:36 PM
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reply to post by Maxatoria
 



Not sure if the same in the states as here but the cell towers basically communicate between each other using tcp/ip as it makes doing 3g browsing so easy so just have a NSA device at each convergence point of several cell towers and job done for the listening and all they need to do is put it all together

I'm certainly not tech savvy enough to answer that but I do understand that if you control communication you control your enemy. I don't like the fact that this device is essentially a line in the sand; you're either with us or with the government. I don't want to go down that wrabbit hole. Too many red flags for me! If Americans want to put an end to government intrusion there are ways to do it through people/policy change. You don't want to feed the 'us against them' nutters and whip the NSA into a frenzy.

Just my $.02



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 12:36 PM
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seabag
I was thinking along these lines. Anything advertised as a way to circumvent government control seems like a government fishing expedition to me; they're trolling for terrorists (or potential domestic terrorists). Something tells me even if it's legit he won't get many (if any) investors and even fewer buyers.


TY for reminding me for forgetting my own principles, "Follow the Money". The bulk of today's business is now only viable if it is in line with the Military Industrial Complex. If its no good for the MIC, it's not worth investing.
On a more sarcastic note. 100$ might just be the gas-money they spend for driving to your house to arrest you. So it might be a "pay your own trip" way of keeping the costs low.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


This is great.
Now, if I can just find something I actually want to hide.
Hmmm guns and ammo won't work.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by randyvs
 

I hear you. I disagree with the surveillance because it's a violation of privacy not because I have something juicy to hide. I'd bore the NSA to death if they were keeping tabs on me. That doesn't mean I like them doing it though.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


At least one purpose of the internet is personal identification of every communication and/or financial transaction. I doubt that ways around this will be allowed in the future. Rather like "the Mark of the Beast"-- without the ID, no transactions or communications.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 





I hear you. I disagree with the surveillance because it's a violation of privacy not because I have something juicy to hide. I'd bore the NSA to death if they were keeping tabs on me. That doesn't mean I like them doing it though.



If you know me in the slightest Seabag, you know I'm with you brother.
I can say this much. If I knew they were watch'n me real close, I'd make
damn sure this would be the look on their face.



i'd only have fun with their asses. In fact i invite them to tag along.
edit on 6-10-2013 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 05:41 PM
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Well they did suffer a blow already.

www.itu.int...




Richard C. Brackney
ITU regrets to announce the death of Col. Richard ‘Dick’ C. Brackney (Ret.).

Dick was a well-known and respected authority on international cybersercurity and had contributed greatly to ITU’s work in the field over a period of more than ten years.

In August he sent a message to his colleagues: "Dear colleagues at MS and International Standards Community: I have enjoyed my work in the Standards community over the years. But, the time has come for it to end. I've learned over this summer that time is VERY precious and my time has ended. Thank you all for your support! ---Dick".

Dick had a wide and varied career including 35 years at the US National Security Agency. He served in combat during Desert Shield/Desert Storm and was the recipient of numerous service decorations including two National Defense Service Medals, and a Meritorious Service Medal.

He will be sadly missed by all including ITU staff, delegates of Study Groups 13 and 17 and the standards and cybersecurity communities at large.

A viewing/memorial service will take place on September 17th (Tuesday) at 7 p.m. EDT at the following location: Howell Funeral Home 10220 Guilford Road Jessup, Maryland 20794. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in memory of Dick to the American Heart Association at honor.americanheart.org...


So a NSA agent who was sent into Microsoft in 2010. And was a big contributor to SG17.

What is SG17? Only the cyber security branch of the organization that controls all global communication lines. They write the standards of how everybody communicates. All communications.

www.itu.int...




​ITU-T Study Group 17 - Security
Work to build confidence and security in the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) continues to intensify in a bid to facilitate more secure network infrastructure, services and applications. Over seventy standards (ITU-T Recommendations) focusing on security have been published.
ITU-T Study Group 17 (SG17) coordinates security-related work across all ITU-T Study Groups. Often working in cooperation with other standards development organizations (SDOs) and various ICT industry consortia, SG17 deals with a broad range of standardization issues.
To give a few examples, SG17 is currently working on cybersecurity; security management; security architectures and frameworks; countering spam; identity management; the protection of personally identifiable information; and the security of applications and services for the Internet of Things (IoT), smart grid, smartphones, web services, social networks, cloud computing, mobile financial systems, IPTV and telebiometrics.
One key reference for security standards in use today is Recommendation ITU-T X.509 for electronic authentication over public networks. ITU-T X.509, a cornerstone in designing applications relating to public key infrastructure (PKI), is used in a wide range of applications; from securing the connection between a browser and a server on the web, to providing digital signatures that enable e-commerce transactions to be conducted with the same confidence as in a traditional system. Without wide acceptance of the standard, the rise of e-business would have been impossible.
Cybersecurity remains high on SG17’s agenda. Additionally, SG17 is coordinating standardization work covering e-health, open identity trust framework, Near Field Communication (NFC) security, and Child Online Protection.


www.legacy.com...
edit on 6-10-2013 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 07:24 PM
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This idea will never work, at best a city can interconnect with itself, but the distances between one city and another are too great to connect different areas.



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 07:33 PM
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Lots'o experts on this thread.


So glad to see that.





-SN



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 07:34 PM
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***Puts down bag of Cheetos, wipes hands on wife beater, grabs phone (while knocking over folding recliner table with said Cheetos and beer), looks for credit card (Doh! don't have one, will debit do or better yet COD?), while the cats runs screeching, the kids wake up...***

I'm sold, for $99.99, I'm gonna BEAT the NSA. Take that you gubmint snoppin scum, 'cause I'm a beer drinkin, cheeto-eatin' 'publican!



posted on Oct, 6 2013 @ 07:48 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 


Here's the tell. I used to work for a special patent review office. NO secure methods of communication got through ... I mean ZERO. So, if there is a patent associated with whatever, take it from me, it is NOT secure.

You want secure COMMS, build it yourself or buy it from another country.






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