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baphomet

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posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
What does it say...


I will tell you what it does NOT say, it does not say that 'el' equals 'him' in Latin. Maybe you can show me a Latin dictionary entry where it first lists 'el' as a word and then gives its definition. Can you do that pepsella?




posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Sure it does it's a man, a he. don you know what a man is ? and a wo-man

It's what it spells- a man, he

As for the rest:
www.myetymology.com...
the Latin word ille (that; those; also DEMONST)
derived from the Proto-Indo-European root *al-
Derivations in Latin
illa
Derivations in other languages
Italian el, Italian e', Italian il, Spanish el, Spanish él



AL proto IE


www.utexas.edu...
Pokorny Etymon: 1. al-, ol- 'beyond; other, alien'

Old Latin: ollus dem.pron he, that
ille, illa, illud dem.pron he, she, that

ille is the same as illus a masculine he.

edit on 21-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Sure it does it's a man...


I need to see that Latin dicitonary entry that first says 'el' is a word and then gives its defintion as 'him'. Do you have that?



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:14 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by pepsi78
Sure it does it's a man...


I need to see that Latin dicitonary entry that first says 'el' is a word and then gives its defintion as 'him'. Do you have that?



Well here is latin grammar:
homo, homin- [man]: homunculus
-el,-il -illus, ellus/a/um cerebrum [brain]: cerebellum

So much for my ficto-latin.



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:15 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
So much for my ficto-latin.


Yes, your Ficto-Latin is quite good. Can you highlight the part where it says that 'el' is a word and its defintion is 'him'. I can not quite make it out in your post.



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

Sure:
-el ,-il -illus, ellus/a/um cerebrum [brain]: cerebellum
A man, it's there:
homo, homin- [man]: homunculus


It's clear that IL EL is a HE.

Like I have said ellus is just a young man, a young he as it is sugested with the diminuative. The younger version of EL


edit on 21-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:24 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Sure:


Sorry, that is just showing suffixes for another word. Let me help you. A dictionary entry would look like this:


El
-pronoun
1. Him/he


Do you have anything like that?



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Sure I do, I posted it, it's in latin, from latin grammar and wikipedia.


edit on 21-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:27 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
That may be another form of a He just like IL and EL.


Do you have the dictionary entry that shows 'el' as being listed as a word (pronoun) and then the definition?



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


I have posted it
il el ellus illus, it's there.



-el ,-il -illus, ellus/a/um cerebrum [brain]: cerebellum
homo, homin- [man]: homunculus




edit on 21-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
I have posted it
il el ellus illus, it's there.


That was just some suffixes for the word 'cerebrum'. Do you have a link to a Latin dictionary that gives an entry for a word called 'el' and then gives its definition as 'him'? I need a link.



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

No, it states MAN, masculine.
Here
homo, homin- [man]: homunculus
illus or ellus is a young man, and ille or il is equivalent to EL.



edit on 21-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
...and ille or il is equivalent to EL.


Do you have a link to a Latin dictionary that shows this? I need a link.



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

It's a grammar site, it translates the meaning of the word, so it is a dictionary.



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:37 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It's a grammar site, it translates the meaning of the word, so it is a dictionary.


Where is the dictionary link? Do you have one, yes or no?



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


It is part of latin grammar, now I have proved it is a he.



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:40 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
It is part of latin grammar, now I have proved it is a he.


Do you have a dictionary link, yes or no?



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:46 PM
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What is this ? Latin roots?


Latin Noun-Forming Suffixes Chapter 3
www.class.uidaho.edu...
Diminutive suffixes: these add the meaning small to nouns. The most important diminutive suffixes from Latin are:

homo, homin- [man]: homunculus
-el,-il -illus, ellus/a/um cerebrum [brain]: cerebellum





www.utexas.edu...
Pokorny Etymon: 1. al-, ol- 'beyond; other, alien'

Old Latin: ollus dem.pron he, that
ille, illa, illud dem.pron he, she, that

edit on 21-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
What is this ? Latin roots?


None of those are giving a defintion of 'el' as 'him', do you have a link? Yes or no?



posted on Jul, 21 2011 @ 06:50 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Sure they do. A man, a he, it states clear.




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