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baphomet

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posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:24 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Yes EL+LUS.

Answer this simple yes or no question; is there a Latin word called 'EL' that means 'him'?

I capitilized it since you are having obvious reading issues.


edit on 17-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.




posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:25 PM
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A surffix
en.wikipedia.org...


In linguistics, a suffix (also sometimes called a postfix or ending) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word.

Meaning EL is the word and then comes the surfix.

Here:


Particularly in the study of Semitic languages, a suffix is called an afformative, as they can alter the form of the words to which they are fixed.

Fixed word EL followed by the surffix.
edit on 17-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by pepsi78
 


Thats not the answer to the question. The question was "EL". not "EL plus you feel (fell) like adding to evade the question. Yes or no to the question?
Dont change the question to suit your answer.

edit on 7/17/11 by scooterstrats because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Meaning El is the word and then comes the surfix.


'El' is not a Latin word for 'him'.

You are so lost it is pathetic. The suffix (not surfix) you are claiming is 'ellus' which is the longer (and less used form) of '-lus' which inidcates a 'youth' or a 'smaller size'. Such as 'equlus' or 'little horse'. But you would have known this since you have studied Latin for so long.

Answer the question; is there a Latin word 'el' that means 'him'?




edit on 17-7-2011 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:31 PM
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reply to post by scooterstrats
 


The answer is negative, EL is the root word LUS is just a surffix. I'll tell you something I would of settled of ellus also, very close to EL, but since it's EL + surffix then I'll take it all.

This is derailing the thread anyway, what is important is that Phonician EL = HIM or HE



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:32 PM
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'El' is not a Latin word for 'him'.

The root word from ellus is el, lus is just a surffix.




You are so lost it is pathetic. The suffix (not surfix) you are claiming is 'ellus' which is the longer (and less used form) of '-lus' which inidcates a 'youth' or a 'smaller size'. Such as 'equlus' or 'little horse'. But you would have known this since you have studied Latin for so long.

It's not what the dictionary says, EL=HIM.

In general EL=HIM or HE, Phonician included, this is not just Latin.

Now Lus is a surffix. The word may be Ellus, but the root word is EL + it's surffix.


edit on 17-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
The root word from ellus is el, lus is just a surffix.


Really? And what does 'el' mean in Latin?



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by pepsi78
 

Interesting. A few posts ago your answer was "yes" (need i quote) now the answer is negative. Please make up your mind. And try to answer a simple question.
By the way, if this is off topic why are you so concerned?



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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Really? And what does 'el' mean in Latin?


El+LUS =HIM in Latin, El the root Lus the surffix.

You still have unsolved misteries with Adversion. =to turn, turn toward in English, formed from ad-version, coming from ad-verse.




edit on 17-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by pepsi78
 


Interesting. A few posts ago your answer was "yes" (need i quote) now the answer is negative. Please make up your mind. And try to answer a simple question.
By the way, if this is off topic why are you so concerned?



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by scooterstrats
reply to post by pepsi78
 


Interesting. A few posts ago your answer was "yes" (need i quote) now the answer is negative. Please make up your mind. And try to answer a simple question.
By the way, if this is off topic why are you so concerned?

What yes and what negative, Negative as in the word is formed from the root with it's surffix.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:39 PM
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reply to post by pepsi78
 


Great. What does EL mean on its own?



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78

Really? And what does 'el' mean in Latin?


El+LUS =HIM in Latin, El the root Lus the surffix.


Totally wrong. The suffix (not surfix) '-ellus' is a masculine modifier to a word, it is not a word with a suffix (not surfix). It indicates a younger or smaller person, i.e. 'Marcellus', 'young/little Marcello' (to paraphrase).

Admit it, there is no Latin word 'el'. You trying to avoid answering this only shows how disengenuous you really are.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by scooterstrats
 

It means him or he, masculine ela feminine.
Your going to argue about the surffix, the root word is EL the surffix comes as an extension.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by pepsi78
 


Stop trying to be so dense. You are fooling no one. Feigning ignorance to what you yourself wrote is not valid here. As i asked, need i quote your own response that will show you contradicting yourself? Its obvious to any other reader here.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:46 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Your going to argue about the surffix, the root word is EL the surffix comes as an extension.


Wow. Did you really just say that a Latin suffix (not a surffix) has its own prefix and suffix (not a surffix)?



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:48 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 


Not really without it's prefix it's a him, the classical is * (Classical) IPA: /ˈ-el.lus/
Ella is something else and derives from el-lus, they have a prefix, but el without a prefix is just a he, him.

this is neutral and also has a surfix.
neuter -ellum

This is valid in other Latin based langueges.

edit on 17-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
Not really without it's prefix it's a him, the classical is * (Classical) IPA: /ˈ-el.lus/
Ella is something else and derives from el-lus, they have a prefix, but el without a prefix is just a he, him.


You have no idea what you are even talking about anymore. Your inability to decline Latin nouns is the problem. 'Ellus' is a suffix, not two words put together, hell, it is not even the more common form of the suffix '-lus'. Stop pretending to know something that you do not.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:52 PM
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Originally posted by pepsi78
but el without a prefix is just a he, him.


What!?!

Stop, please.

'El' does not indicate a gender in Latin.



posted on Jul, 17 2011 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

EL without a prefix is just a HE, it's clear that it comes from the Phonician EL or from other parts where EL is present as in a masculine. The name "HE"-BREW talks about just this.

El means him, he also in spanish, romanian, french and I bet a lot of other ancient languages.
edit on 17-7-2011 by pepsi78 because: (no reason given)



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