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New Orleans teen shot in the head by man who thought he was burglar

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posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:46 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
Including shouting something like, "I've already phoned the police and I've got a gun aimed at you. Leave my property peacefully and I'll just point them in the direction you went."?

And by the time the homeowner spits out that mouthful of pop-PC-BS ... the perp could have shot him or attacked him. In this case, it's a 'professional thief'. Even his family says so.

It amazes me how some folks are continually anti-legitimate-gun-owner ... and yet they always defend these lowlife thieves and thugs




posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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I do not believe in the idea that crime is OK as long as it happens to someone else. Seems too many do though.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by seabag
 

Your point is valid, though the first point still stands, where were the child's parents and what was this young person doing out at 2 am?

What I find ironic, is that if a person walks into a convience store and just sticks his hand in say a pocket and makes it look like he has a firearm, then the person is considered armed and dangerous.

So in that aspect, why is this any different, than say this kid sticking up a convience store with just his fingers in the pocket of a jacket?



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by IvanAstikov
 



Shooting someone who is breaking into your vehicle while your family are safe inside the house, is not self-defence.


I live in Texas. If you steal someone’s stuff in the middle of the night in Texas you’ll likely end up with a third eye socket in your forehead.


A person is justified in using deadly force against another to protect land or tangible, movable property:

(1) if he would be justified in using force against the other under Section 9.41; and

(2) when and to the degree he reasonably believes the deadly force is immediately necessary:

(A) to prevent the other's imminent commission of arson, burglary, robbery, aggravated robbery, theft during the nighttime, or criminal mischief during the nighttime;
codes.lp.findlaw.com...

edit on 29-7-2013 by seabag because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
reply to post by KawRider9
 


Home protection shouldn't entitle someone to shoot anyone they see on their property, whatever the level of threat they present.

emphasis mine

Am I mistaken, or are you saying that there is NEVER a situation in which deadly force can be used to protect oneself or property?

People should just fall to the ground in a ball and hope the threat goes away and shame on them for trying to protect themselves?

I mean, it's their fault for having nice things that make other people loose control of themselves, right?



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by theRhenn
 


Someone tried to enter my property while I was in it. As I never used to secure my front door while I was home and awake, and as I seldom answer my door unless the person announces who they are through the letterbox, when someone came knocking on my door one Sunday afternoon and after a minute or so without me replying, then began to open the door, I was ready for them in a flash, and soon as the door was wide enough and I could see it was nobody I knew, I gave them a solid push with both hands, sending them stumbling back out the doorway. I then told him if I saw him near my door again, I would beat the # out of him. He started trying to give me some blag about he'd got the wrong address and thought he knew who lived here, but it was only half-hearted and as he was walking away.

I suppose it helps knowing the chances of anyone coming to my door with a firearm is zero to miniscule.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov



Homeowner Merritt Landry, 33, who lives in Marigny, allegedly shot Marshall Coulter after fearing for his safety, and told friends and family he thought the teen had a gun. Read more: www.nydailynews.com...


Do you gun owners really think that is a justifiable reason for shooting somebody in the head who isn't actually threatening you at the point you are pulling the trigger?


YES!!!!

If you don't want bad things to come unto you, don't break into peoples homes.

If you don't like the fact that the punk was shot, maybe teach the kid not to break into houses.

You, in many statements here on ATS, operate on this idea that people should only react to situations like this, and not view it as how it really is. No one truly knows what this punk kid was going to do once inside.

We have a right to defend ourselves and our property. By force if you live in a state that values rights.

The kid chose to break in and paid the cost. Too bad he didn't encounter someone that put him in his place early on in his criminal endeavors.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


Don't you know??? These days, it is the fault of the homeowner. He enticed the little kid to come over the fence with a poorly lit backyard and a car filled with goodies.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:56 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
reply to post by theRhenn
 


Someone tried to enter my property while I was in it. As I never used to secure my front door while I was home and awake, and as I seldom answer my door unless the person announces who they are through the letterbox, when someone came knocking on my door one Sunday afternoon and after a minute or so without me replying, then began to open the door, I was ready for them in a flash, and soon as the door was wide enough and I could see it was nobody I knew, I gave them a solid push with both hands, sending them stumbling back out the doorway. I then told him if I saw him near my door again, I would beat the # out of him. He started trying to give me some blag about he'd got the wrong address and thought he knew who lived here, but it was only half-hearted and as he was walking away.

I suppose it helps knowing the chances of anyone coming to my door with a firearm is zero to miniscule.



You bring up a good point.

If you live in a country with almost NO firearms then your reaction will be much different. That's not the case in America. Freedom comes with risks....it's a trade off.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
reply to post by KawRider9
 


Home protection shouldn't entitle someone to shoot anyone they see on their property, whatever the level of threat they present.



What does the law say???

I guess "property" only pertains to what is inside the house, and not the other space you own.

Don't want to get shot?? Don't go into other peoples property expecting to get tea and cookies.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


Each to their own. Myself, I'd rather associate with someone who was a petty thief than someone who'd shoot a petty thief.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:59 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
reply to post by KawRider9
 


Including shouting something like, "I've already phoned the police and I've got a gun aimed at you. Leave my property peacefully and I'll just point them in the direction you went."?

It's the ones who would just take a snide pot-shot at a sitting duck I have objections to, so if you're not one of them, you're cool with me.


edit on 29-7-2013 by IvanAstikov because: (no reason given)


Law does not require such BS.

Don't want to get shot, don't enter my property without permission.

I have no problem shooting, as I have no idea that if by voicing who I am and what I have, that the little turds buddy isn't waiting to help him.


edit on 29-7-2013 by macman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 02:59 PM
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Why would someone in New Orleans just believe they won't be killed by a criminal. Murders happen often because criminals get away with it very often. The New Orleans gangs learned how it was different in other states after Katrina.

Maybe convicting a home owner will make up for the other prosecution failures in the court's mind.



The city had 179 murders in 2008 and 174 in 2009. Already this year there have been 106 people killed.

The question becomes: why such an incredible murder rate? Most would answer that it has something to do with "the 60-day rule." According to Louisiana State Law Article 701:

(1)(a) When the defendant is continued in custody subsequent to an arrest, an indictment or information shall be filed within forty-five days of the arrest if the defendant is being held for a misdemeanor and within sixty days of the arrest if the defendant is being held for a felony.

In other words, the defendant has to be formally charged within two months of arrest, or they walk free. This specific article is the basis for the phrases '701-released' and '60-day homicide'. After Hurricane Katrina many New Orleanians relocated to Houston, TX. Feuds carried over to new neighborhoods, and arrests were made. Houston police didn't understand at first:

But when police interviewed the suspects, they suddenly understood why New Orleans was so violent. No matter what police said, they couldn't get the suspects to talk. They had no leverage because no one took their threats seriously. It was a logical response: in New Orleans, 93% of people arrested from 2003 to 2004 never went to prison. "It was a real eye-opening experience," says Sergeant Harris. "People born and raised in Houston seem to have an understanding of consequences, of punishment. You can show them the options, and they start thinking, Wow, maybe I should start cooperating." With New Orleans evacuees, Sergeant Harris says, "there is no baseline. They have no concept of consequence."

It was the first time the Houston police had heard the phrase "60-day homicide." Suspects would say, "This ain't nothing but a 60-day homicide," meaning that if they kept quiet for 60 days, they would walk--just as they had too often in New Orleans.

www.metafilter.com...

edit on 7/29/2013 by roadgravel because: tag



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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So a 14y/o punk burgler gets shot in someones yard at 2am.This is surprising?
edit on 29-7-2013 by TDawg61 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
reply to post by seabag
 


Shooting someone who is breaking into your vehicle while your family are safe inside the house, is not self-defence.



Oh, you know the little turds intent then. Or you are aware that the guy was able to see through the turds clothing, to verify that he isn't armed?



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov

Originally posted by theRhenn


dead thieves cant sue you


True, but you need to be certain they don't have vengeful family members if you are going to make a habit of it.
edit on 29-7-2013 by IvanAstikov because: (no reason given)


preventive maintenance ... hmmm good idea for a new law. I mean.. if the family seems to be a threat.. why not?




posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by sdcigarpig
 


My thought is they want everyone to have guns. That way they'll be gun violence, and that way they can use these major cases as a way to institute more and more laws, and as a result make more money that way.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by sdcigarpig
reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 

The reason I am calling him a child, is that the laws in most cases, a child is considered a child until the age of consent. And in the State of Louisiana the age of consent is 17. So the person shot is a child.

You are entirely correct.
He was a child.
Too bad there weren't some parents around to treat him like he was a child when it mattered. Someone failed him. Kids that have good parents don't have a rap sheet for multiple burglaries at age 14, IMO.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
reply to post by theRhenn
 


Someone tried to enter my property while I was in it. As I never used to secure my front door while I was home and awake, and as I seldom answer my door unless the person announces who they are through the letterbox, when someone came knocking on my door one Sunday afternoon and after a minute or so without me replying, then began to open the door, I was ready for them in a flash, and soon as the door was wide enough and I could see it was nobody I knew, I gave them a solid push with both hands, sending them stumbling back out the doorway. I then told him if I saw him near my door again, I would beat the # out of him. He started trying to give me some blag about he'd got the wrong address and thought he knew who lived here, but it was only half-hearted and as he was walking away.

I suppose it helps knowing the chances of anyone coming to my door with a firearm is zero to miniscule.



So when they come back armed, don't cry here.

In all likelihood, you encountered a person either casing neighborhoods or just a thief that uses the "unlocked" door approach.

I have no qualms with shooting someone doing exactly what you described.



posted on Jul, 29 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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Double


Post
edit on 29-7-2013 by seabag because: (no reason given)



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